#1
I've been having some trouble recently with some jazz changes. I am working on a chord tone soloing book but I think that learning solos/ complex heads could help as a different angle or as ear training.

What are some good solos or pieces to work on? I have the charlie parker omni book, but I'm also looking for other styles like fusion.
#2
George benson Kenny burrell,and jim hall would be top of the line guitar material for seeing how they solo..very jazz blues based and tonal..

fusion will require that you have your diatonic harmony in ALL keys down...and you know what Modes are and how to use them in that context..

the 1970-75 era of herbie hancock, wayne shorter, john McLaughlin, Miles Davis, larry Coryell, al dimiola and chic corea would be some source material in that style..

fusion and beyond..check out alan holdsworth
play well

wolf
#3
Wait, heres a whole great article
http://davidliebman.com/home/ed_articles/the-complete-transcription-process/
basically I'd learn a tune, find a very clear bop version of it (a good example would be All The Things You Are, and the Charlie Parker Track Bird of Paradise), and learn the tune....then learn to sing the bop line or solo with the record and eventually from memory, then put it on your instrument. Theres a book called How To Play Bebop Vol 3 (vols 1-2 are pretty much trash) by David Baker that covers a comprehensive way to then take the solos and heads you learn and practice and internalize them.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#4
giant steps

everybody worth a lick of salt has a giant steps recording somewhere

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yJwyvueH_ks

(this is for bass but idc bass is way better anyway)
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#5
Depending where you are with your studies, Joe Henderson, Michael Brecker, early Miles Davis and early John Coltrane.

I think one of the real challenges using chord tone targeting is to avoid sounding mechanical ... so developing a notebook of phrases (rhythmic), including start and stop points, can help break that down.

As for Giant Steps, with enough front, can stick to choosing just one scale for soloing, and use that everywhere, so long as the facial expression is genuine.

As part of my studies, I did eventually (and I mean eventually) learn Giant Steps, and how to navigate it sounding ok, but it's not the first tune springs to mind when playing with mates, and looking back on, wasn't worth all that effort!
#6
Quote by Hail
giant steps

everybody worth a lick of salt has a giant steps recording somewhere

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yJwyvueH_ks

(this is for bass but idc bass is way better anyway)



Like the bass expecially. Guitar is staying very safe ... be honest, this track would be better just leaving guitar out, especially when it's fighting against the "horns" (which with the bass work really well together).
#7
Quote by Hail
giant steps

everybody worth a lick of salt has a giant steps recording somewhere

(this is for bass but idc bass is way better anyway)
to be fair, VERY few people can play /well/ over Giant Steps
they're coming to take me away
ha-haaa
#8
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Like the bass expecially. Guitar is staying very safe ... be honest, this track would be better just leaving guitar out, especially when it's fighting against the "horns" (which with the bass work really well together).


well sean malone is a bassist and this was a solo album

i guess you could say this was him treating the guitar like solo guitarists treat bass
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You win. I'm done here.
#9
I think the best solos to help you deal with jazz changes are the solos you like. There are tons of players out there, no need to take stuff from players you don't like.

Normally i would advice Chet Baker and Miles Davis, but if you don't like listening to them you shouldn't learn from them. But if you do like them, those are two of the best entry points to jazz soloing.

As for fusion, it depends on what kind of fusion you mean. I mean Hancock, Holdsworth and Govan are all considered to play fusion, but they sound radically different. I like Herbie Hancock a lot, he writes great tunes.

I think the main thing is don't be too picky with what solos you learn. Early on in my jazz playing i spent way too much time looking up different solos before choosing one to learn. The best thing is simply to listen to players you like and when you hear a tune/solo you like, start working on that one.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#10
Quote by Hail
well sean malone is a bassist and this was a solo album

i guess you could say this was him treating the guitar like solo guitarists treat bass


Thanks for making me aware of him, Hail. As a fervent guitar addict, I ought to stick up for the guitarist, but ... can't believe I'm saying this ... the bass wins here, for sure.
#11
Quote by Sickz
I think the best solos to help you deal with jazz changes are the solos you like. There are tons of players out there, no need to take stuff from players you don't like.

Normally i would advice Chet Baker and Miles Davis, but if you don't like listening to them you shouldn't learn from them. But if you do like them, those are two of the best entry points to jazz soloing.

As for fusion, it depends on what kind of fusion you mean. I mean Hancock, Holdsworth and Govan are all considered to play fusion, but they sound radically different. I like Herbie Hancock a lot, he writes great tunes.

I think the main thing is don't be too picky with what solos you learn. Early on in my jazz playing i spent way too much time looking up different solos before choosing one to learn. The best thing is simply to listen to players you like and when you hear a tune/solo you like, start working on that one.



+1. I still will just grab a snippet from wherever, as it catches my ear, put it in Transcribe, slow it down, and add it to my library of licks. But when I improvise, I don't often play these note for note, but draw upon the essence, I guess.
#12
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Thanks for making me aware of him, Hail. As a fervent guitar addict, I ought to stick up for the guitarist, but ... can't believe I'm saying this ... the bass wins here, for sure.


if you've never checked out cynic, sean malone was the bassist for them. he's one of the few guys who used a fretless for metal

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hq_DiR5frEA

he also has a bunch of stick recordings and i think he's a professor somewhere or another

for whatever reason his sinfonia in d minor recording isn't on youtube and i'd need to dig up my old desktop to get the mp3 and upload it. it's really nice though
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#13
No need for the fancy players... just pick up some Louis Armstrong. Pretty basic in terms of technique, but his melodic approach is really the foundation of all the jazz that came after.

And the OP is right to pursue repertoire. Jazz is an aural art form that really requires the player to know the songs intuitively through repeated listening and practice. Learning jazz just on paper won't work.

The basic chord tone soloing you start with as a learner won't sound much like a real jazz solo, but that's not just because of note choice. There's a lot of rhythm, feel, and melodic embellishment that makes jazz sound jazzy. Chord tones are at the core of all that, but the relationship isn't always as simple as chord = arpeggio.
Last edited by cdgraves at Nov 22, 2015,