#1
I just made a guitar practice schedule it consists of warm up, 1 hour practicing/learning scales, 1 hour remembering or playing stuff i once knew and forgot/already know and 1 hour of practicing new stuff, different songs everyday. i will do these 5 days a week and rest 2 days not to overpractice. is this enough to become a good guitar player?
#3
It's enough time to get decent. Just don't get caught up in making the hours more important than what you do during them!

Depending what your goals are, it's not difficult to use your weekends and push that up to 20+ hours a week.
#4
I'm not trying to be a dick, but it really depends on how well you study, and can study in general.
#5
How's what you said being a dick? I know that it depends on talent, I was asking on average...
Last edited by luffy1999 at Nov 20, 2015,
#6
I think you can get too warped up in talent....

Just how you can get wrapped up in physicality, fat fingers, small hands, it dosent matter too much.

I sometimes think talent is a fantasy.

It's more how you practice.
#8
Hi, I think 3 hrs is enough time to become really good, but maybe not with that practice approach. Don't get me wrong, practice can be really different for everybody, but with it being so open ended as "practice old stuff for an hour" or "practice new stuff", I would think that it would not be nearly be as focused as having clear concrete items to practice written down on a list. At the very least I would have it split into categories based off of areas you want to improve.

These categories might be specific songs, skills, or maybe even certain guitar techniques.

Again it really depends on you playing goals I guess. Some people want completely different things.
"In the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years."-Abraham Lincoln
#9
Quote by Robfreitag
Yes, as others have said it's about working smarter, not working harder.

Listen to Marty Friedman:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRHInnT_J4Q


Marty is the man, I just got to see him at a small show in pittsburgh a couple of months ago and it was awesome!
"In the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years."-Abraham Lincoln
#10
I'd like to add one thing that really increased the value of my practice sessions. Record what you practice, especially during periods of creativity. Oftentimes I would find myself playing along, and out of the blue would play a really cool sounding riff. Hit rewind and try to replicate it. Chances are if you've played it once, you can play it again.
#11
Quote by luffy1999
I just made a guitar practice schedule it consists of warm up, 1 hour practicing/learning scales, 1 hour remembering or playing stuff i once knew and forgot/already know and 1 hour of practicing new stuff, different songs everyday. i will do these 5 days a week and rest 2 days not to overpractice. is this enough to become a good guitar player?


It's enough to be a great player, not a good player.

I would designate at least 1 hour to learning songs and solos by ear per day for about at least 4 or 5 months.

Ignore anyone that tells you to work "smarter" not "harder".

Time = improvement on guitar. All the greats practiced insane amounts of hours. There are no shortcuts and no special secrets to becoming a great musician, despite what internet is trying to sell you, - the only secret is practicing - a lot.
Last edited by reverb66 at Dec 21, 2015,
#12
Quote by Saintp83
Marty is the man, I just got to see him at a small show in pittsburgh a couple of months ago and it was awesome!


I love Marty, but that video advice is a complete crock of sh$t. A player with his skill did not practice 1 hour per day - I would bet my life on it, it was probably along the lines of 4 to 8 hours per day.

Paco Delucia, Steve Vai, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Guthrie Govan, Kurt Rosenwinkel, John Pettrucci etc - all the greats practiced insane amounts of hours.

I've never known any guitar player who practiced an hour per day and was amazing. You simply don't have time to progress in an hour, which is basically a warm up for real players.
Last edited by reverb66 at Dec 21, 2015,
#13
Quote by luffy1999
I just made a guitar practice schedule it consists of warm up, 1 hour practicing/learning scales, 1 hour remembering or playing stuff i once knew and forgot/already know and 1 hour of practicing new stuff, different songs everyday. i will do these 5 days a week and rest 2 days not to overpractice. is this enough to become a good guitar player?


It's not a workout or a homework assignment, it's a hobby. Even if it becomes a career it's meant to entertain you FIRST. So in short I personally think you are over thinking it. How I approach it? I just play, I work on songs, theory, and so on. Some days I might play for 15 minutes, other days for several hours. I never look at it as over playing or under playing just that I want to play. I do want to get good at certain things and with that I put more time into it. For instance one song I am playing there is this one chord transition I fumble with so I been making exercises to help me improve and I will do that. But unless you have to be somewhere don't worry about the time.

As far as what is a good guitar player? There is no real answer to that. Shredders shred, finger pickers finger pick, and then there is everything else too. Just enjoy it, and being good comes with practice but don't make it a chore, just make it something you do. How do gamers get great at games? They play, and a lot. But do they focus on how much they play? Probably not.
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Taylor 314 & GS Mini & Martin LX1
#14
That's more time than most people put into it. A two day rest every week is a bit much, however. Play at least a little on those days. Perhaps just run through the stuff you already know and have fun playing on those days, instead of the more boring practise. Jam out and have fun
#15
Quote by reverb66
I love Marty, but that video advice is a complete crock of sh$t. A player with his skill did not practice 1 hour per day - I would bet my life on it, it was probably along the lines of 4 to 8 hours per day.



I don't doubt at all that he practised for more than an hour a day, but what he says makes a huge amount of sense in the context of a music teacher's general audiance (unfortunately). The people who will practise for great lengths and stay focused the entire time will tend to do that just through the inspiration of getting better - I'm willing to bet that his video is meant to inspire people who otherwise wouldn't practise at all to practise at least a little. Is it a soft lie, sure, but there's still truth behind the statement that a dedicated half hour to an hour is more valuable than two hours of noodling.
#16
my take..you will play what you practice..

scales are NOT practice..they are a prep for practice..much like a boxer doing roadwork is not sparring-which is practice..scales arps etc just get you ready for practice--a concentrated time of one hour on NEW material can be far more effective than many hours doing things you already know and playing riffs (noodling)

the object of practice in music is to develop your musicianship..not to be the fastest player in the world or any of that..can you play music..any of it..can you HEAR music..and then play in on the instrument..example its holiday season..holiday jingles are fairly easy..can you knock out a couple in several keys--in different positions..try jingle bells..things like this are minor benchmarks of progress..

I read how some guys can play "dream theatre" solos note for note..but the don't know how to form basic triads..which would only take a fraction of the time to learn..and be far more helpful in learning/playing thousands of songs--literally!

I realize everyone has their own goals and decide what is important to them and what they want to play..for me it was to learn music first and then apply it to guitar
play well

wolf
#17
yeah, one a hour a day isn't going to get you above novice level. You can proficient with specific pieces you practice over time, but it's not really enough to get you improvising fluently or learning tunes quickly by ear. At a certain skill level you need more than an hour a day just to avoid getting worse, and a few hours a day at least to advance steadily. The video really seems to be aimed at beginners.

Quote by wolflen
my take..you will play what you practice..

scales are NOT practice..they are a prep for practice..


People seem to have trouble with this distinction. Scales are only practice material until you've learned them. After that, they are for warming up and technique maintenance.