#1
What PA gear do you use for your band's gigs really. Up to recently I've gone out with a Mainly Yamaha set up

MG16/6FX mixer http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/nov03/articles/yamahamg166fx.htm

Yamaha S112V tops http://usa.yamaha.com/products/live_sound/speakers/passive_speakers/concert_club_v_series/?mode=series
S118V bass bins
SM115V monitors

All this is driven by a couple of Peavey IPR1600 amplifiers with a Behringer EP2400 in reserve. For smaller venues we use just the tops with a couple of home brew monitors or the Yamaha Stagepas 300 used as monitors. I take the Yamaha stagepas mixer amp with me to all gigs as a backup. It has four channels of mic and 170W a channel and at a pinch would act as a spare bass amp (I'm the bassist) For mics we use Shure Beta58's and AKG D5's. We mainly use the tops for vocals only and the instruments go through the backline for the small pub venues we mostly play. We DI instruments when we play bigger venues and mic the kick drum with one of the AKG's.

Be really interesting to see what the rest of you use.
Last edited by Phil Starr at Nov 21, 2015,
#2
I play in a small group at church and we're using a Presonus 16.4.2 mixer on stage with us, which is feeding the church's FOH mixer and PA system. We're using the stage monitors at the moment and our guitar amps are all miked. Planning to purchase some stage monitors of our own next year and run them off the Presonus mixer. Looking at the JBL Eon series.
#3
I use:

Soundcraft EFX 12
EV ELX-112P x 2
EV ELX-118P x 2

Behringer powered speakers for foldbacks.

Beta 58s for Vox, Beta 52/SM57s for drums and amps.

We don't use the subs for all gigs.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#4
I am currently using a pair of active Mackie Thumps 12's on stands and a pair of active Mackie Thump 15's on the floor with a Behringer Xeynx USB 2222 mixer. I replaced my older Mackie mixer with the Behringer last year and it works well. For monitors, it depends on the job. If we have room I use two active Behringer Eurolive B15's which I had before I bought the Mackie Thump speakers. If the room is smaller (which is often) I use Behringer Eurolive 205 personal monitors on stands for each person (these are clones of the Mackie SRM 150 but $100 less). My system has more than enough power for the places we play and is adaptable because I can use more less stuff if needed. I highly recommend the Mackie Thump series. I have had them for about three years and never had a issue. We do 50-60 gigs a year and they have held up well and are surprising light.

I also have my older system with two (heavy) QSC power amps and an assortment of speaker cabinets and way to heavy subs if I need to go bigger but that stuff hasn't been used in a few years. I'm getting to old to move that stuff every week.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Nov 23, 2015,
#5
Interesting that we are all tending to leave the subs behind. It's a lot simpler to use backline and just go for vocals through the PA, which makes the subs irrelevant. I'd guess we're all looking at most of our gigs being in pubs and bars?

I'd recommend the Yamahas for any band starting out. They are a bit old school being passive and with fairly heavy wooden cabs (which generally sound better than plastic cabs IMO). They aren't completely honest, with a midrange peak that pushes the vocals out nicely but we got a vocal sound only equalled by one other local band using the same speakers and beaten by a couple of bands using high end RCF and QSC 12" tops. The slightly enhanced vocal sound works well in live music. They are dirt cheap used and so much better than the Peavey's and so on used by many bands.
#6
Quote by Rickholly74
I am currently using a pair of active Mackie Thumps 12's on stands and a pair of active Mackie Thump 15's on the floor with a Behringer Xeynx USB 2222 mixer. I replaced my older Mackie mixer with the Behringer last year and it works well. For monitors, it depends on the job. If we have room I use two active Behringer Eurolive B15's which I had before I bought the Mackie Thump speakers. If the room is smaller (which is often) I use Behringer Eurolive 205 personal monitors on stands for each person (these are clones of the Mackie SRM 150 but $100 less). My system has more than enough power for the places we play and is adaptable because I can use more less stuff if needed. I highly recommend the Mackie Thump series. I have had them for about three years and never had a issue. We do 50-60 gigs a year and they have held up well and are surprising light.

I also have my older system with two (heavy) QSC power amps and an assortment of speaker cabinets and way to heavy subs if I need to go bigger but that stuff hasn't been used in a few years. I'm getting to old to move that stuff every week.


I like the sound of the Thumps, a local female semi-acoustic band use them and their act depends upon the quality of their vocal harmonies which the Mackies do well. My only reservation is their maximum output is a lot less than the SRM's.

We also use the B205's, which are pretty much a straight match for the SRM 150's. Do you use them as we do, with the mic going through them and then a line out to the mixer from the monitors? I feed a vocal monitor mix from there back to floor monitors so there is a vocal mix on stage for the band with the B205's as a bit 'more me' for singers.
#7
My mike goes directly into a Digitech Vocalist 2 so I can add harmony parts then out to the mix board. I find the Behringer B205's are very good for smaller clubs where there is just no room (or need) for floor monitors. One thing is they are extremely directional so inches make a big difference when setting them up. I can aim one about chest high right at my face from about 3 feet away and they sound pretty loud without feedback. Move the monitor a few inches one way or another and the sound cuts in half. I do like them a lot.

As far as the Mackie Thumps go they just seem to work well, nice and clear with enough power for medium sized clubs and on the Mackie 15's I like the sweep-able mid control to adjust the frequency boost or cut of the midrange. I also like the fact that they are fairly light. I'm older now so that matters to me.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Nov 25, 2015,
#8
Mackie 1402VLZ board
JBL EON 15P Speakers- mains
EV ZLX-12p monitors
Shure SM58s
A few DDLY and Verbs

We run 4 vocal mics and keys only through the board. Drums are already loud as hell and subs no longer match our vintage vibe so we sold them. Our backs thank us. We are a vocal heavy band with lots of 3-4 part harmony and we must hear each other clearly for matched tone and phrasing. Guitar and bass easily match drummer volume so no mics needed on those. Simple setup and quick sound check for a good mix.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Nov 25, 2015,
#9
Looks like a good set up. Keeping it simple always works well and good quality in those monitors. How do you get on with the SM58's?
#10
Quote by Phil Starr
Looks like a good set up. Keeping it simple always works well and good quality in those monitors. How do you get on with the SM58's?


The ZLX might be the sweetest powered wedge monitors for vocals we have ever used. We have been through JBL, Altec, EV, Sunn passive wedges over the years but I am favoring these a lot.

SM58s are the vocal mic I have used for 30 years so I know them really well. The Beta series is a supercardioid with better feedback suppression and a more pronounced presence peak but the trusty SM58 is a Shure thing.

If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#11
Yeah I like the EV's.

I'm not a big fan of the SM58's sound, the diaphragms are a bit heavy and they lack midrange detail compared with more modern designs. What I have come to realise though is that a mic is like an instrument in it's own right, you get to know it with use and the mic you are most used to is the one you'll get most out of, just like an old well used guitar.

What surprises me is that there aren't more cardioid mics out there. Feedback control is important but I move around a lot on stage and something with a tight hypercardioid pattern is a difficult thing to use, you have to be right on the mic to sing. I've relegated my AKG to occasional use in favour of a Sennheiser cardioid for that reason. To be fair the Beta 58 is only just a super cardioid, not quite as forgiving as the SM58 but better than most. Sounds lovely too, much more detail than it's parent as well as the presence.
#12
I have used SM 58's since the 70's and still have my original one and it works great (I have replaced the mesh ball several times over the years). The thing about the SM 58 that makes it so legendary is not only the decent sound but the durability. You can't kill an SM58 and for road bands or performers who are tough on their equipment that's a big bonus. I think like a lot of gear I also got use to the sound of an SM58. It just becomes "the sound" after so many years.

About two years ago I was fortunate to get a pair of Shure 87A mics for helping someone sell some high end recording equipment and I started using the 87A as my main mic. Now the SM58 sounds a little dull to me but I still carry a number of them in my mic case and use them as needed. If I hadn't been given the 87A's I would never have spent $250 on a PA mic and rolled on as usual with the SM58 but I really like the open sound of the Sure 87A.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#13
Nothing special, just a Peavey PV8 without the USB and power supply, it is enough for what I need. I also have additional Hosa connectors to make it a 5-mic PA system (4+1) connected to Anchor Audio AN1000x (two units).
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.
Last edited by psp742 at Nov 27, 2015,
#14
Haha the longevity of Shures is well earned. I've still got a 45 year old Unidyne that works perfectly even though it doesn't sound up to modern standards so sits in a box in the loft nowadays.

I'd love to use a set of Beta87's, my favourite gigging mic, if I could afford them. Trouble is that then I'd have to upgrade the PA to get the best out of them.
#15
Phil you make a valid point. When I first got the Shure 87's we played a gig at a club that had it's own in-house PA system (pretty nice one). After 2-3 songs into our first set I looked at my partner and it was obvious that the Shure 87's were really different than our Shure SM58's, and I mean that in the best way. The sound was so much clearer. When I did another gig with our own system I was disappointed, so much so that I bought a new mixer (I had been thinking about this for some time).

Your comment about these mics prompting some PA upgrade was true in my case. As good as the mics are the down side is the price of the Beta 87's. At $250 each I would never have considered buying them. I do have one regret. The guy who gave me the two I now have actually had four of them and he offered me all four for helping him sell and move the gear in his recording studio which had gone out of business. I told him that was too much for just helping him sell some gear. I took two with sincere thanks. I now wish I had taken all four.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Nov 29, 2015,
#16
Quote by Rickholly74

Your comment about these mics prompting some PA upgrade was true in my case. As good as the mics are the down side is the price of the Beta 87's. At $250 each I would never have considered buying them. I do have one regret. The guy who gave me the two I now have actually had four of them and he offered me all four for helping him sell and move the gear in his recording studio which had gone out of business. I told him that was too much for just helping him sell some gear. I took two with sincere thanks. I now wish I had taken all four.


I feel your pain. Mind you somebody passed on an old high quality EV mic in similar circumstances and I don't use it because it reveals how poor my voice is.