#1
So I've been composing my own acoustic songs for about 2 years now and I had a friend record some demos for me and originally had the thought of recording a 4 song EP. I have uploaded to soundcloud a number of rough demos and covers and over the summer decided the songs I wanted on the EP and had my friend record the demos. I planned to have the EP recorded at my local studio shortly after this Christmas. Now a studio is by no means cheap and I don't want to waste money. I've had good and bad feedback regarding my music. One of the notable things which came up was my voice which is by no means amazing. Some people really like my voice while others do not. The question I'm asking myself is that, is it worth going to a studio and recording some mediocre tunes with a far from perfect voice? Is it better to use the demos for the EP and have a lo fi release? Linked below are the demos which my friend recorded for me. Any feedback would be great. Sorry if this is the wrong forum for what I'm asking.

https://soundcloud.com/dommilham/mrs-riverside

https://soundcloud.com/dommilham/the-raft-official-demo

https://soundcloud.com/dommilham/brown-eyes-official-demo

https://soundcloud.com/dommilham/its-real-1
#2
Not worth re-recording these four songs. If anything, have someone re-mix these four so that your vocal isn't buried under guitar, and maybe overdub some stuff to make it a little more interesting.

Your voice is fine, but the songs are absolutely mediocre, as you said. I know sometimes people say that to try and down-sell good songs in order to lower expectations, but these songs are absolutely mediocre. Doesn't mean they're not special to you and they are absolutely a snapshot of a moment in time for you as a musician, so do your best to capture them and keep them with you.

My mantra as a musician/producer/etc is to always *serve the song* and give the song the recording it needs in order to shine. I don't think paying for studio time will improve these songs, the demos are very close to the best you'll get without rearranging everything and adding drums bass hooks etc. Just put in a little more work to get the mix more balanced, and then move on to your next batch of songwriting and arranging.

You have a lot of potential, and this is a great first step. Lock this step in and start building on what you've already accomplished, I believe you have the ability to create even better music and it's not as far away as you think it is!

You'll get loads of different opinions anywhere you go, but if it's worth anything, I work in music publishing in Nashville and hear hundreds of worktape demos from some of the best songwriters in the country (and beyond!). We have high standards here, but the whole idea is to aim high and keep growing and you'll get up there before you know it!
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#3
Quote by Sid McCall
Not worth re-recording these four songs. If anything, have someone re-mix these four so that your vocal isn't buried under guitar, and maybe overdub some stuff to make it a little more interesting.

Your voice is fine, but the songs are absolutely mediocre, as you said. I know sometimes people say that to try and down-sell good songs in order to lower expectations, but these songs are absolutely mediocre. Doesn't mean they're not special to you and they are absolutely a snapshot of a moment in time for you as a musician, so do your best to capture them and keep them with you.

My mantra as a musician/producer/etc is to always *serve the song* and give the song the recording it needs in order to shine. I don't think paying for studio time will improve these songs, the demos are very close to the best you'll get without rearranging everything and adding drums bass hooks etc. Just put in a little more work to get the mix more balanced, and then move on to your next batch of songwriting and arranging.

You have a lot of potential, and this is a great first step. Lock this step in and start building on what you've already accomplished, I believe you have the ability to create even better music and it's not as far away as you think it is!

You'll get loads of different opinions anywhere you go, but if it's worth anything, I work in music publishing in Nashville and hear hundreds of worktape demos from some of the best songwriters in the country (and beyond!). We have high standards here, but the whole idea is to aim high and keep growing and you'll get up there before you know it!


Thank you very much for the reply. Really helped!
#4
Listened to "Mrs Riverside", the production is not bad. I guess you could take that to a studio and have them maybe remix and finesse the vocals a bit with autotune.

I didn't totally hate the vocals but can't say that I liked them either...I think you might want to take that $ and apply it towards a vocal coach.

Your friend is good with the production of your recorded material, I don't think it needs more, at least juding by this song. There was a level change at the end that seemed weird, might want to address that as the volume of the performance seemed to drastically come up.

Personally, I wouldn't mind hearing a bit more diversity on that song, maybe a flute, some kind of percussion, but essentially it is your call.

Get some vocal lessons, especially on delivery and enunciation.
#5
I like your voice
but I kind of have the feeling that I'm listening to the same song but that may be unfair I don't know
Last edited by João1993 at Nov 23, 2015,
#7
I agree with the above. It's a good start but these songs are not ready for the studio. You have the basic concept of good songs but you need to work on them more. Don't get discouraged with work you might have something pretty good.

Here's my humble opinion. For me the lyrics don't go anywhere. They just seem like unrelated lines strung together. There is no particular story or reason to make me want to keep listening you know the old "who, what, where or why" is missing. The constant repetition of the chords would be ok if the words were out front and taking the listener somewhere. Something like this is Neil Young's bread and butter but he tells a story or focuses on one idea that any listener will understand and want to hear more about.

I would also suggest that you work on tightening up the songs arrangements. Shorter intros and forget those long repeated endings. For example your song "Brown Eyes" is 3:33 but you could easily cut that down by a minute or more if you did less repetition at the beginning, end and between verses. Since there is not a lot of changes going on keep it short and to the point.

Hey, that's just my worthless 2 cents. A good friend of mine always says, create in haste, edit at leisure. What you have here are good basic ideas. Now you need to go back and work on making the good parts better and throwing out the bad parts. Good luck.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Nov 24, 2015,
#8
Thank you. I have decided to break off from publishing music for a bit and try and work on something new. I've enjoyed this era of making music but it's time to move on to something better.
#9
Quote by Guitarplayer21d
Thank you. I have decided to break off from publishing music for a bit and try and work on something new. I've enjoyed this era of making music but it's time to move on to something better.

Are you saying that you're going to stop making music now because of what we said here? Because that's definitely the opposite of what you should do.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#10
I agree with Sid. You said, "any feedback would be great". I hope you meant that because I just wanted to help and encourage you.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#12
No not at all. I am continuing to make music, just different styles etc. Moving on from my old stuff etc. Never going to give up on making music, it's something I love and enjoy
#13
Quote by Guitarplayer21d
So I've been composing my own acoustic songs for about 2 years now and I had a friend record some demos for me and originally had the thought of recording a 4 song EP.



It's a yes/no answer. Part of it depends on the studio. You don't want to waste money at a place that doesn't get much better quality than you could get. A good producer will help make your songs better.

My advice would be to pre-produce everything yourself, then take it to a good studio. You have to be willing to allow for changes/new ideas to the songs, but it's worth it. And when you do the pre-production yourself you can continue to get better at recording.

Hope this helps