#1
I've been playing guitar on and off for about 6/7 years (only been the past year i've become more dedicated to it) the idea of joining a band was always scary to me (i'm a perfectionist with some stage anxiety)

However recently i've started thinking it might be a good idea. I don't know many songs, i tend to learn riffs from songs. I would ideally love to be in a classic rock band, i can't shred fast (or indeed shred at all) but i have a good concept of blues playing and can very easily play over a blues backing track

Trying to solo over a rock backing track however is something i find tricky (purely from a speed side of things). Should i improve my speed before looking to join a band?

Also i should point out that i'm all for rhythm playing i just seem to have a different idea when people mention chords. Whenever people talking about learning chord songs i think of the boring pop songs that you hear buskers play, songs like Shook me all night long & Tie your mother down rhythmically i love and i'm actually trying to learn those two songs currently
#2
Quote by Tcrumpen
I've been playing guitar on and off for about 6/7 years (only been the past year i've become more dedicated to it) the idea of joining a band was always scary to me (i'm a perfectionist with some stage anxiety)

However recently i've started thinking it might be a good idea. I don't know many songs, i tend to learn riffs from songs. I would ideally love to be in a classic rock band, i can't shred fast (or indeed shred at all) but i have a good concept of blues playing and can very easily play over a blues backing track

Trying to solo over a rock backing track however is something i find tricky (purely from a speed side of things). Should i improve my speed before looking to join a band?

Also i should point out that i'm all for rhythm playing i just seem to have a different idea when people mention chords. Whenever people talking about learning chord songs i think of the boring pop songs that you hear buskers play, songs like Shook me all night long & Tie your mother down rhythmically i love and i'm actually trying to learn those two songs currently


no I don't think you have to improve your speed before joining a band
if a band asked for a fast guitar player I'd just run away from that band..
I don't have experience in a serious band however it seems to me that your making a big deal out of it.. just go for it. if you can improvise over stuff that's good that's all you have to do to get started just listen and play
#3
Just do it. You will go through all the joys and frustrations everyone goes through. Playing in bands with other musicians and doing live gigs is an excellent learning experience. I have been doing it for more than 40 years and I am still out there doing it. Don't worry about how good you are, you may be better or worse than others but you'll find your place and you'll grow all around as a musician. There is lots of compromising involved but that just goes with the territory and makes you better by experiencing things you would not have played on your own. You'll never know if you can hit a baseball if you never step up to plate.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#4
No matter how fast you get, you will generally suck in your first band, because it is your first band, and you have to learn how to play with other humans.

Just go for it. Being in a band is heaps of fun and it will make you a better musician.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
from my experience i was never in a band to show off my skills assert my dominance with major shreds or form the next beatles. i did it for fun because playing music with other people is fun. these are dudes like you who play 1 instrument and need others to compliment it, they're there to play with you not audition or test you. i agree with what others are saying if you want to play good music you need to learn to play with other people. this might not be your best band, but you need to start somewhere and any other musician you form a band with is just as 'nervous' to play their best as you. just remember it's not about playing your best for someone showing you've got awesome talent, it's about having fun playing music.

I was nervous the first time i replied to an ad to join a band i was practicing the songs we agreed to 4 hours a day before we met up for a jam cause i didn't want to fuck up. in the end it was the other dude that fucked up but it didnt matter because we were enjoying it and it stopped being an audition and ended up just being two dudes having some laughs and trying to keep in time with each other
how do you edit signature?
#6
Quote by Tcrumpen
I've been playing guitar on and off for about 6/7 years (only been the past year i've become more dedicated to it) the idea of joining a band was always scary to me (i'm a perfectionist with some stage anxiety)

However recently i've started thinking it might be a good idea. I don't know many songs, i tend to learn riffs from songs. I would ideally love to be in a classic rock band, i can't shred fast (or indeed shred at all) but i have a good concept of blues playing and can very easily play over a blues backing track

Trying to solo over a rock backing track however is something i find tricky (purely from a speed side of things). Should i improve my speed before looking to join a band?

Also i should point out that i'm all for rhythm playing i just seem to have a different idea when people mention chords. Whenever people talking about learning chord songs i think of the boring pop songs that you hear buskers play, songs like Shook me all night long & Tie your mother down rhythmically i love and i'm actually trying to learn those two songs currently
I've been in bands of all kinds (well, most kinds) for the last 50 years, playing my first gig 10 months after I first picked up a guitar. IMO, there are two main ways of thinking about being in a band:

1: a bunch of mates, a gang who hang out. You're in it for fun, and share the same tastes in music (more or less). Doesn't matter if there's no money in it. Doesn't matter if none of you are much good, as long as you're all roughly the same level. If you ever play live, it will probably be to another bunch of mates/family in a local bar or at a party.
You (or one or two of you) might write your own songs, but mainly it's just covers and jamming.
Quite likely, the band won't last, as different members "grow out of it", or move house, or their families or jobs take more of their time.

2: a group with ambitions to "make it". Can start out like the above, but may well involve sacking anyone with poor skills, and hiring strangers.
Again, you'd start with covers and jamming, but the goal is to write all your own stuff. You'd be conscious of image (although less so the older you get ) and of exactly what kind of band you are, what genre you're focussing on.
Ironically, this kind of band is likely to play fewer gigs than the above, because your music is likely to have narrower appeal. The fewer popular covers you play, the smaller your audience becomes. But then if you're in this kind of band, you don't care about that. You're in it for the long haul, not for immediate (superficial) kicks. You will eventually win a loyal fanbase which will steadily grow.
Ideally, of course, the band will take off and be successful, even if it takes years. But the vast majority of bands like this fail. The fanbase doesn't materialise, or just falls away too soon. They argue among themselves and split. Or they go through many difficult changes of personnel before some completely new line-up will eventually get somewhere.

There's a third kind of band, half-way between these two: the professional (or semi-pro) functions band: playing slick covers for weddings, conventions, etc. Most bands of type 2 sneer down their noses at this type. The music is usually cheesy, designed to appeal to all ages, either for dancing or for inoffensive background ("dinner jazz"). The upside is it's well paid, and can be fun (as long as your mates don't see you doing it ); and you don't have to be young.

Type #1 is really the best way to get into it. If you don't already know one or two friends who play, get out and meet other musicians at open mics, or advertise in your local area. Treat sessions as social gatherings, not as serious musical exercises. You play a song, you drink beer. Another song, another beer. (After a certain age, it becomes coffee or tea... )
More seriously, you learn off each other, and you learn essential ensemble skills, such as staying in time, balancing your dynamics, knowing where you are in a song, listening to everyone else and not overplaying. It's not about showing off technical skill, but about making a cool noise all together. It can be an incredibly exciting way to spend your spare time - even before you play in public, or if you never do.

Type #2 means auditions! Nail-biting! Even if they like you and you're in, it's going to feel deadly serious - maybe until you get to know them, and find you share a sense of humour.
If this is your aim, then bear in mind that most bands appreciate good rhythmic skills, over and above flashy lead playing. You MUST have strong time, and you need to understand dynamic balance - play loud enough but not too loud; be aware of your role. You need to know plenty of chords, and probably a handful of common chord sequences.
If applying as a lead player, you should know how to improvise on common chord sequences. Being able to rip out a favourite metal solo may impress, but it doesn't show adaptability. Suppose that song is not in their repertoire? Would you be able to jam on an unknown song of theirs that they present you with?
Naturally the advantage of being in a band like this is the sense of purpose you have. You feel important, and you have a joint ambition. You're on your way! That in itself is exciting, outside of the music itself.

The 3rd kind of band is the one you end up in after the other two fail!
Last edited by jongtr at Nov 26, 2015,
#7
Quote by jongtr
I've been in bands of all kinds (well, most kinds) for the last 50 years, playing my first gig 10 months after I first picked up a guitar. IMO, there are two main ways of thinking about being in a band:

1: a bunch of mates, a gang who hang out. You're in it for fun, and share the same tastes in music (more or less). Doesn't matter if there's no money in it. Doesn't matter if none of you are much good, as long as you're all roughly the same level. If you ever play live, it will probably be to another bunch of mates/family in a local bar or at a party.
You (or one or two of you) might write your own songs, but mainly it's just covers and jamming.
Quite likely, the band won't last, as different members "grow out of it", or move house, or their families or jobs take more of their time.

2: a group with ambitions to "make it". Can start out like the above, but may well involve sacking anyone with poor skills, and hiring strangers.
Again, you'd start with covers and jamming, but the goal is to write all your own stuff. You'd be conscious of image (although less so the older you get ) and of exactly what kind of band you are, what genre you're focussing on.
Ironically, this kind of band is likely to play fewer gigs than the above, because your music is likely to have narrower appeal. The fewer popular covers you play, the smaller your audience becomes. But then if you're in this kind of band, you don't care about that. You're in it for the long haul, not for immediate (superficial) kicks. You will eventually win a loyal fanbase which will steadily grow.
Ideally, of course, the band will take off and be successful, even if it takes years. But the vast majority of bands like this fail. The fanbase doesn't materialise, or just falls away too soon. They argue among themselves and split. Or they go through many difficult changes of personnel before some completely new line-up will eventually get somewhere.

There's a third kind of band, half-way between these two: the professional (or semi-pro) functions band: playing slick covers for weddings, conventions, etc. Most bands of type 2 sneer down their noses at this type. The music is usually cheesy, designed to appeal to all ages, either for dancing or for inoffensive background ("dinner jazz"). The upside is it's well paid, and can be fun (as long as your mates don't see you doing it ); and you don't have to be young.

Type #1 is really the best way to get into it. If you don't already know one or two friends who play, get out and meet other musicians at open mics, or advertise in your local area. Treat sessions as social gatherings, not as serious musical exercises. You play a song, you drink beer. Another song, another beer. (After a certain age, it becomes coffee or tea... )
More seriously, you learn off each other, and you learn essential ensemble skills, such as staying in time, balancing your dynamics, knowing where you are in a song, listening to everyone else and not overplaying. It's not about showing off technical skill, but about making a cool noise all together. It can be an incredibly exciting way to spend your spare time - even before you play in public, or if you never do.

Type #2 means auditions! Nail-biting! Even if they like you and you're in, it's going to feel deadly serious - maybe until you get to know them, and find you share a sense of humour.
If this is your aim, then bear in mind that most bands appreciate good rhythmic skills, over and above flashy lead playing. You MUST have strong time, and you need to understand dynamic balance - play loud enough but not too loud; be aware of your role. You need to know plenty of chords, and probably a handful of common chord sequences.
If applying as a lead player, you should know how to improvise on common chord sequences. Being able to rip out a favourite metal solo may impress, but it doesn't show adaptability. Suppose that song is not in their repertoire? Would you be able to jam on an unknown song of theirs that they present you with?
Naturally the advantage of being in a band like this is the sense of purpose you have. You feel important, and you have a joint ambition. You're on your way! That in itself is exciting, outside of the music itself.

The 3rd kind of band is the one you end up in after the other two fail!

#2 Band is where i envision myself ending up in a few years. Right now i'm looking to mainly have fun with music till i work out whether i want to actually dedicate my life to music / guitar
#8
Quote by Tcrumpen
I've been playing guitar on and off for about 6/7 years (only been the past year i've become more dedicated to it) the idea of joining a band was always scary to me (i'm a perfectionist with some stage anxiety)

However recently i've started thinking it might be a good idea. I don't know many songs, i tend to learn riffs from songs. I would ideally love to be in a classic rock band, i can't shred fast (or indeed shred at all) but i have a good concept of blues playing and can very easily play over a blues backing track

Trying to solo over a rock backing track however is something i find tricky (purely from a speed side of things). Should i improve my speed before looking to join a band?


That is what I was hoping to do. I can play very confidently and I know music theory, chord construction and scale construction, diatonic chords etc. But i can't write my owns songs yet, or write my own demo etc. I was hoping to meet/make friends with similar music interests and contribute towards hopefully an A-list band. - I just need to get a mon-fri job so i can dedicate the weekend.