#1
I have got a Fender CD-140SCE Acoustic Guitar, and the action is 7mm above the fretboard, which is too high for me. My music teachers have tried to adjust the action, but could not reach the truss rod, not even with an Alan Key. Has anyone had experience with this, or could help me?
#2
Is the truss rod piece underneath the top board of the guitar? And in so deep towards the neck?

I worked on a guitar like that. You might have to shine a light in to see what you are doing. The alan key was not long enough to clear the sound hole to turn. Look into one of these: http://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/Tools_by_Job/Truss_Rods/

Also rods can help with action but they really adjust neck bow, so you might need to look into the bridge and nut as well.
Last edited by Will Lane at Nov 24, 2015,
#3
Sounds to me like you might need to take it to a luthier to get a proper setup, probably some filing of the bridge and nut is in order as well as truss rod adjustment. I wouldn't do it myself, especially as it sounds like you're just starting out.

Whatever you do, don't use Guitar Center's luthiers, they're horrible, find a small local independent shop, their guys usually are much better. Maybe ask your teacher for recommendation?
#4
Quote by diabolical
Whatever you do, don't use Guitar Center's luthiers, they're horrible, find a small local independent shop, their guys usually are much better. Maybe ask your teacher for recommendation?


I'm curious, who do you use?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#5
Texas Music Emporium (1st choice). I've used a few others like Ron Pace who now is ridiculously expensive and usually has interns working on guitars, but back when he was one man operation (late 90s mid 2000s) we were very happy with him.

Guitar Center usually subcontracts local luthiers and charges double to recoup their time, or what is worse, hands off to one of their in-store schmucks that thinks can repair guitars. Everything I or students have gotten back from them has been a total disaster, they couldn't even do string change and intonation right most of the time.
#6
Quote by diabolical
Texas Music Emporium (1st choice). I've used a few others like Ron Pace who now is ridiculously expensive and usually has interns working on guitars, but back when he was one man operation (late 90s mid 2000s) we were very happy with him.

Guitar Center usually subcontracts local luthiers and charges double to recoup their time, or what is worse, hands off to one of their in-store schmucks that thinks can repair guitars. Everything I or students have gotten back from them has been a total disaster, they couldn't even do string change and intonation right most of the time.


Everything I can't do (or don't want to do) myself I take to Neil Sargent. His prices are always very fair (too fair sometimes, I feel guilty and add a bit) although if you're in a hurry he's probably not the guy to go to.

But the quality of his work has always been impeccable, at least for me.

Who do you teach for?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#7
Quote by Arby911


Who do you teach for?


Myself... Used to. Don't have the patience anymore.

I pretty much learned to do my setups and soldering, haven't seen a tech in ages but I send my other guitarist to TME and they seem to do a good job on his guitars.
#8
Check around at some auto parts stores, you should be able to find a long version of this

http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=31939086&cp=2568443.2568450.2628076.2628625.2629179

Places like Sears, Lowes and Home Depot might have them too.

They can be found in standard and ball end, SAE or metric. Standard L shaped allen wrenches are also available in long sizes, I used them a lot in machine shops. Still have a bunch.

When adjusting the truss rod sometimes you have to use the long end instead of the short end to reach the nut, and you can use pliers to turn it with if you need more power.

I would set the action (bridge height) before fooling with truss rod, the truss rod is only used to adjust neck relief. Once bridge height is set so you have the action you want, then check for neck relief.

Capo at first fret, press top or bottom string at 12th to 14th fret. You should have around .007" to .012" at the 7th fret. .015 is about the most you want, most people can get along with around .010. I play pretty hard sometimes and I think mine is around .010. That goes for electric and acoustic, I've never had any problems keeping mine in the middle of the clearance range.

If you have anywhere from .010 to .015, the truss rod is fine. If it needs to be adjusted, turn it no more than 1/4 turn at a time, then let it settle in overnight before doing anything else. It takes the wood a while to settle into place, it doesn't just move instantly when you adjust it. Tightening, clockwise, should give you less clearance, loosening, counter clockwise, should increase clearance.

Setting bridge height on an acoustic means sanding the bottom of the bridge saddle to lower it. If it's an acoustic electric, be careful removing it, you also have a pickup under there. It should be connected to a small wire, be careful with that wire. Sand only a little at a tome and check it. Tedious, but it avoids taking off too much and getting the strings too low.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#10
Thanks for all your help, I have decided to just play with the current action as it wasn't that unbearable after playing with a new set of strings, and there are no luthiers around for miles, I live in a small town in the UK.
#13
Quote by ryan.shawbinns
When did I say I live in Manchester haha?
When you wrote your profile.