#1
1. Okay, take a basic C Major chord - C E G. How come (on the guitar) it's commonplace to play it as C E G C E? (Add the 1st and 3rd an octave higher). Can this be done on any chord? Does it change the name of the chord?

2. I'm not too familiar with add chords, but take for example a Cadd9. It's essentially C E G D. How come, when played on guitar, it's played as C E G D G and not C E G D E like in a regular C major chord? Why is a finger placed on the third fret high E instead of playing the high E open like on a regular C major chord? Why is that last extra note added at all?
#2
I may be wrong, but my thought is that on guitar those chords are played that way due to ease of fingering. For the open C chord, notice that the highest note is "E". If there were one string higher I suspect there would be one more note: G

So basically you have C E G C E G or 1 3 5 1 3 5

To my knowledge, that is simply a C chord.

By the way, if you were to use the low E string and finger a low G, this would be C/G or a C chord with a G as the root.

Hope that helps
#3
The order of the notes in the chord doesn't matter. It's a C major chord if it has C, E and G in it (in any order).

There are many many different voicings for the same chord. You could play a C major like
x 3 2 0 1 3 if you wanted to. It's the same notes. What notes you double/the order of the notes doesn't matter.

Cadd9 could also be played x 3 2 0 3 0. The x 3 2 0 3 3 voicing may be more common because it's usually used in songs that are in G major, and it's a smooth change from the G major chord
(3 2 0 0 3 3). What voicing you decide to use is all up to you. As long as it has C, D, E and G in it, it is a Cadd9. The notes can be in any order.

Here is another Cadd9 voicing: x x 10 9 8 10

Quote by sonicnuance


By the way, if you were to use the low E string and finger a low G, this would be C/G or a C chord with a G as the root.

Not as the root. The root of a C major chord is always C. G would be the bass note in C/G.
Quote by AlanHB
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Nov 25, 2015,
#4
They're just different inversions. Doesn't matter what the order is for naming the chord unless you want a specific inversion for whatever reason.

CEG, ECG, GCE... they're all the same chord in the same context, but ECG is also an acronym for electrocardiogram.
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#5
Quote by JJ1994
1. Okay, take a basic C Major chord - C E G. How come (on the guitar) it's commonplace to play it as C E G C E?
Because it's easier to add those 2 notes than mute those strings.
Quote by JJ1994
Can this be done on any chord?
The guitar's 6 strings, and the way they're tuned, governs which notes are doubled on the common chord shapes in order to give playable shapes.
Quote by JJ1994

Does it change the name of the chord?
No.
Quote by JJ1994

2. I'm not too familiar with add chords, but take for example a Cadd9. It's essentially C E G D. How come, when played on guitar, it's played as C E G D G and not C E G D E like in a regular C major chord?
I always play it C E G D E. Either is fine, it's optional.
Quote by JJ1994

Why is a finger placed on the third fret high E instead of playing the high E open like on a regular C major chord? Why is that last extra note added at all?

1. Because some people prefer an extra G to an extra E.
2. Because it's often paired with a G played as G B D G D G (3 2 0 0 3 3), and an Em7 played E B E G D G (0 2 2 0 3 3). And maybe Dsus4 and A7sus4 too - all with the same 2 fingers on the top 2 strings.
#6
A chord is defined by the notes in it, regardless of how many times the notes repeat. We're not talking about inversions or cadences; that's all you need to know.
#7
Quote by JimDawson
They're just different inversions. Doesn't matter what the order is for naming the chord unless you want a specific inversion for whatever reason.

CEG, ECG, GCE... they're all the same chord in the same context, but ECG is also an acronym for electrocardiogram.

No, they are not inversions, unless the lowest note is something else. They are just different voicings.

In an inversion you change the bass note. C/G and C/E would be inversions. The order of the other notes doesn't matter. The inversion is always determined by the lowest note (usually played by bass but if guitar is the lowest instrument, then it's the lowest note of the guitar chord voicing).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Just to add - CEGC is "close voicing" because all the notes are found in the first octave. Open G shape is another close voiced chord.

Take the open A chord as a contrasting example. The notes are A E A C# E. This is "open voicing" because the third is in the second octave.

They have a different sound. Barbershop music is associated with close harmony. Open voicings feel more spacious. Next time you're playing, take note of whether you're playing open or close voiced chords.
#9
Quote by MaggaraMarine
No, they are not inversions, unless the lowest note is something else. They are just different voicings.

In an inversion you change the bass note. C/G and C/E would be inversions. The order of the other notes doesn't matter. The inversion is always determined by the lowest note (usually played by bass but if guitar is the lowest instrument, then it's the lowest note of the guitar chord voicing).



Ah, my bad! Thanks for the correction.
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