#1
Hey everybody!
I tried this scale and I'm curious to see what the name would be, if anybody has an idea:
C; C#; D#; F#; G; G#; A#. Would do you guys think?
I tried this to get close to the 7-note microtonal pelog scale (found on oddmusic) and it's got some nice intervals in it. With twelve-tone notes, what would this scale be called?
Last edited by jzRTCAQ!PY13575 at Nov 27, 2015,
#2
Quote by jzRTCAQ!PY13575
Hey everybody!
I tried this scale and I'm curious to see what the name would be, if anybody has an idea:
C; C#; D#; F#; G; G#; A#. Would do you guys think?
I tried this to get close to the 7-note microtonal pelog scale (found on oddmusic) and it's got some nice intervals in it. With twelve-tone notes, what would this scale be called?
Um first, it's not really acceptable, (using western notation conventions), to have two of the same letters in the sequence. I see the issue though, where you're going to have a mixed #/b key signature if you don't

I'm going to suggest the following note naming: C, Db, Eb, F#,G, Ab, Bb. (Sorry about that).

The spacing, (as likely already know) would be: 1, 2, 3, 1, 1 , 2, 1

The 1/2 tone movement from tonic to 2nd, usually sounds Phrygian. an any 3 step movement alludes to Gypsy, Hungarian, or Byzantine, double harmonic minor sorts of things.


Now the bad news. I haven't a clue what to call this.

But just out of curiosity, do you have a plan as to what you're going to do with it?

Have you extracted the chords out of the sequence?

Have you tried tracking the intervals using a different starting tonic,?In other words a different "mode" of the scale.

And my last question, wouldn't this thread be better placed in the "Musician's Talk" sub forum?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 28, 2015,
#3
@Captaincranky you are definitely correct about this thread being in the wrong forum, I didn't see that other one before. About the sequence: no need to be sorry, I learnt something new, I'm just not use to flats compared to sharps. I haven't looked into it properly, when I get the time, I'll see if it can be used somehow, and what chords it offers. As for modes, I haven't looked into that either for the moment. There are a few scales that I haven't looked into much yet due to them being a bit odd (the tritone scale seems difficult to use), but knowing more scales is just fun and you get some nice new intervals when you messing around with your usual ones.
Though when I look at the mode I chose and the major scale, it seems that only one of the notes goes a semitone up, which gives 3 chromatic notes in the scale.
Last edited by jzRTCAQ!PY13575 at Dec 4, 2015,
#4
I blocked it out wrong, (as I am wont to do at times), and you do have two either "minor 2nds", or "chromatic steps", call them as you will, in a row.

No traditional western musical scale, (at least AFAIK), exhibits such an interval.

Although, those intervals are used in the blues scale at times. (The blues doesn't adhere to 'traditional' musical theory, at least in the context of major and minor diatonic scales).

In any case this might help: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blues_scale

Every time a topic such as this shows up, I drift back to an article I saw in the August 1980 Guitar Player Magazine titled, "Exotic Scales". I'm sure the same info is on the web somewhere though, most of it at Wiki, but you would need to be able to read music to get the most out of it.

This should sort out the "when is a note a sharp or a flat question".

Scales are built on a template of intervals. You need all 7 note names in the scale. None missing, with no duplicates.

So, a major scale's intervals (in semi tones) is, 2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2 ,1 (*)

The chromatic scale is all half tones, so you skip a few to form a diatonic scale.

Pick any letter to start on. If you go past the next natural note, you have a sharp, if you stop before the next natural note, it becomes a flat. Try blocking out C, G, & F majors from the pattern above (*). C will be all naturals. G will have 1 sharp, F#. Lastly, F major will have one flat, Bb.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 5, 2015,
#5
@Captaincranky Sorry I took a while to respond: thanks for the info, I need to start a bit of theory, it could be useful. Though if you had a 9 tone scale, would it be possible to have no duplicates? Seems a bit hard really. Or more simply, isn't there a limit for having no duplicates?
#6
Quote by jzRTCAQ!PY13575
@Captaincranky Sorry I took a while to respond: thanks for the info, I need to start a bit of theory, it could be useful. Though if you had a 9 tone scale, would it be possible to have no duplicates? Seems a bit hard really. Or more simply, isn't there a limit for having no duplicates?
In western notation you only have 7 letters, so no.

I'm not sure what the question is. Do you want 9 letters, or 9 pitches?

Is standard diatonic (8 pitch) scales, you begin and end on the same letter. So, the 1st note or pitch is the "tonic", or key name. The second time it occurs it is still the key name, but also the octave, or "8va" as you might find it marked on sheet music. (8va is also used to avoid excessive lines above the staff or changing clefs).

Assuming you're talking about adding another pitch to an existing key, that note would be called, (or considered if you will), an "accidental", and would be given a separate sharp, flat, or natural marker, which is only good for the measure it is notated.

Using certain sharp or flat keys, sharps and flats are doubled (!!), to avoid naming conflicts. This only happens with sheet music used for instrument transposition.

Keys which would require ## or bb, would be reached "enharmonically", using the paired note on the chromatic scale. (Every sharp or flat has TWO names). Quick example, "D#" is also, "Eb".

The Key of C major has all natural notes: C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C.

If we change the key to "C#, every note will be sharp. So: "C#" would be: C#, D#, E# (really F natural),F#, G#, A#, B#, (really C natural), and finally C#.

In standard orchestral notation, the key of "C#" doesn't exist!. It would be notated as "D flat", this is the "enharmonic" notation I spoke about earlier. Since the key of D flat only has 5 flats as opposed to 7 sharps, it is the preferred name for that key.

Since the Key of G major has 1 sharp, the F#, that same F#would become "F##" F double sharp. (So now we have a key with all sharps, plus the double sharp). So, "G#" is never used in standard notation, but rather Ab (4 flats) instead.

With modes, it is possible to have a mixed key signature. (Sharps and flats on the same staff).
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 11, 2015,