#1
I am wondering is there any way to improve my guitar technique because I can't barely even play fast without making a mistake and I moved my hand movements little as possible but that doesn't work either. I feel so discouraged, sometimes I just want to give up.
#2
never give up.Maybe you are trying to learn too fast.Guitar is just practice,I remember somebody told me"if you want to play fast,start with playing slowly" there is not any trick to make you play faster rapidly,just practice,but you can find some daily execises on youtube.
#3
Technique is a really broad term. If you have a genre or band you want to sound more like or a skill you want that really helps.

In general my advice:

BE OPEN MINDED LISTEN TO EVERYTHING YOU CAN (black metal pop music rap w.e just be willing to try it, there is always something cool to inspire you) You don't have to like everything!

Have fun with the guitar first and foremost. If you aren't enjoying it you won't keep playing and you won't keep progressing.

Keep playing. No matter the skill level, you can't progress without playing. Even more so early on. Build good habits.

Play music from bands you like.

Want to learn something specific? There is sooooooo much information in videos text and otherwise online. Want to play fast? you will find SOOO much about that (here is a hint: Play slowly and accurately, with a metronome)

Just relax, we all have days where we want to toss the guitar out the window.

Hope this helps.


Bonus: Speed is a byproduct of accuracy and muscle memory, if you can play it slow and accurately without much thought you will be able to play it faster. I find I play a section twice SUPER SLOWLY with the metronome and then once as fast as I can (just to keep me sane) and repeat this until I get it down.
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1423285

This thread is meant for solos but it applies to everything. Also most songs really don't take 21 days (and some take more) but its the method that works.


edit: don't be afraid to get a teacher either. I have been playing since the age of 6 and I still hire a teacher every once in a while to check what I might be doing wrong. I had to relearn holding the guitar pick due to bad instruction at a young age. You don't need to take regular lessons but taking a month of instruction on a specific problem can go a LONG way.
Last edited by Blicer at Nov 28, 2015,
#4
If your really want to improve your technique you got to put some effort in it. Practicing 1 hour a day isn't going to do it. All the best do at least 4 hours. Also be patience it's going to take more than 1 year.
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#5
Except the usual advice (practice proper technique, make sure you are relaxed, making economical movements etc) there are a few other culprits that can hold your playing back.

1. Your rhythmic abilities. It is hard playing in different tempos with different rhythms if you can't subdivide properly and play on time with those rhythms. Can you feel different rhythmic values/grouping over a pulse? Can you feel sixteenth notes properly at 120? How about quintuplets? (Five notes on each beat) Being certain with rhythms is a great way to develop your technique skills, practicing fundamentals (scales, arpeggios, chords) with different rhythms is great for your technique and flexibility.

2. Can you hear fast? This was one of my biggest flaws when i got into college studying jazz, and why i resorted mainly to slower lines in my improvisation and playing in general, i couldn't hear fast. Part of it comes from being able to subdivide the beat (the point number 1) but part of it is developing your ears to the point were you can hear stuff and (almost) instantly know how to play it (or atleast be able to sing it). If you can hear fast it gets much easier to play fast and to play guitar in general. Ear training is important.

3. Patience. Guitar technique is a physical thing as well as a mental thing. Mental things take time to learn (It took time for you to learn to speak your first language when you were a baby) and physical things take time to learn (working out at a gym you are not going to get amazing results after a week or two, it takes dedication and regular training to get where you want to be)

Cheers.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#7
Practice slow and keep at it. Play as often as you possibly can. Worry about learning the material with no mistakes and qork on the speed after.
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My D is major
#8
I always want to throw my guitar out the window. I never improve no matter what.
#9
I did that and of course I always make a mistake. No matter what tempo it could be 1 and I would still make a mistake.
#10
Quote by Sickz
Except the usual advice (practice proper technique, make sure you are relaxed, making economical movements etc) there are a few other culprits that can hold your playing back.

1. Your rhythmic abilities. It is hard playing in different tempos with different rhythms if you can't subdivide properly and play on time with those rhythms. Can you feel different rhythmic values/grouping over a pulse? Can you feel sixteenth notes properly at 120? How about quintuplets? (Five notes on each beat) Being certain with rhythms is a great way to develop your technique skills, practicing fundamentals (scales, arpeggios, chords) with different rhythms is great for your technique and flexibility.

2. Can you hear fast? This was one of my biggest flaws when i got into college studying jazz, and why i resorted mainly to slower lines in my improvisation and playing in general, i couldn't hear fast. Part of it comes from being able to subdivide the beat (the point number 1) but part of it is developing your ears to the point were you can hear stuff and (almost) instantly know how to play it (or atleast be able to sing it). If you can hear fast it gets much easier to play fast and to play guitar in general. Ear training is important.

3. Patience. Guitar technique is a physical thing as well as a mental thing. Mental things take time to learn (It took time for you to learn to speak your first language when you were a baby) and physical things take time to learn (working out at a gym you are not going to get amazing results after a week or two, it takes dedication and regular training to get where you want to be)

Cheers.


Well, I've been playing over a year can't get past 80 without making a mistake no matter what tempo. I could be in 1bpm and still make a mistake
#11
Quote by cdgraves
Using a metronome is half of getting your technique decent. General musicianship is most of the rest.



I've been stuck on 80 for the last month.
#12
Quote by frecebutmito
never give up.Maybe you are trying to learn too fast.Guitar is just practice,I remember somebody told me"if you want to play fast,start with playing slowly" there is not any trick to make you play faster rapidly,just practice,but you can find some daily execises on youtube.



I kind of gave up, I can't even barely go past 80 without making a stupid mistake. I might as well give up already.
#13
80bpm? quarters, 8ths, 16ths?

Is there a specific thing you're trying to play at this tempo?

If you hope to get some concrete advice, you should post a video of your left and right hands playing so we can actually see what the problem might be.

And for what it's worth, being "stuck" at some place for a month after only a year of playing is not bad at all. You've got the rest of your life to get better, and once life start taking over, you'll be glad you put in the hours when you had the time.
Last edited by cdgraves at Dec 2, 2015,
#15
Quote by cdgraves
80bpm? quarters, 8ths, 16ths?

Is there a specific thing you're trying to play at this tempo?

If you hope to get some concrete advice, you should post a video of your left and right hands playing so we can actually see what the problem might be.

And for what it's worth, being "stuck" at some place for a month after only a year of playing is not bad at all. You've got the rest of your life to get better, and once life start taking over, you'll be glad you put in the hours when you had the time.



And this is me doing my guitar technique exercise.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7pHQDHn0RE&feature=youtu.be