#1
I've been interested in learning jazz for a while on either bass or guitar. My problem is that many of the more popular/easier jazz standards don't have tabs for just the main melody. I'm not good at reading sheet music (I'm more of an ear and tab kind of guy) and find it mostly unhelpful. Can anyone tab out just the main melody (bass or guitar tab) for one of the more popular Jazz standards like "Misty", "Autumn Leaves", "I got Rhythm", "Satin Doll", "Blue Bossa", and "Minor Swing"? It would be really helpful for starting out. I mostly play metal and rock but I thought it'd be interesting to try playing Jazz.

Still working on my own music and trying to improve my playing.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#2
I would advice against this if you want to get into jazz. Learning from tab is not something we (jazz players) really do unless we need a really specific fingering for something, and in most cases we will still figure out one for ourselves and use that one.

I recommend trying to get these down by ear, since that is what the jazz tradition is all about. All the standards you mentioned have very simple melody lines and you should be able to get them out with some effort. Just listen to the songs a lot, preferably by a singer that doesn't embellish the melody too much (Frank Sinatra for example), and learn to sing along with the melody one phrase at a time. Then find them on your instrument. You will have much more fun with jazz, get more out of it, learn it faster and understand it quicker if you learn to use your ears early on.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#3
jazz tabs? Not sure there's such a thing.

If you want to get into jazz, reading at some level is a basic competency, as is using your ears. They're both just a matter of practice.

Take a tune you like, get as much as you can by ear for a couple practice sessions, then look at the chart in a real book and learn it proper. Learn and transcribe melodies and solos. The advantage of reading is that you can put the visual and the aural skill together - "hearing" what you read.

It's great practice to get random chart from the Real Book and just play through it at whatever pace you can; both melody and chords.
Last edited by cdgraves at Nov 30, 2015,
#4
I agree with the above.

It doesn't need much reading skill to be able to work out notation for jazz melodies. They're mostly pretty simple (simpler than the chords!), and you only need to know (a) which note is on which line and space, and (b) what difference key sigs and accidentals (# and b) make.
Rhythms can be harder to read, but that doesn't matter for jazz melodies, as long as you can find recordings and hear how the rhythms work, and/or if you know the lyrics.

It might take you a while to work out just one tune, note by note, but it will be worth it, and will get quicker.

There are various free sites to help:
http://www.guitarlessons.com/guitar-lessons/guitar-theory-ear-training-and-reading/how-to-read-sheet-music/
http://www.celticguitarmusic.com/standard_notation_primer.pdf
http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/lessons/reading-notation-and-tablature.htm
#5
I've always preferred tab because I've learned my guitar neck up and down and I find it easier to communicate the information (I can use my ear to adapt to/figure out the rhythms). I also find tabs to be more beneficial if you usually do it yourself (helps develop a better ear and only requires notebook paper) and if necessary use other's tabs as a guideline at best. I'm trying to learn Jazz but it's impossible without some good jazz melodies (I mainly want to learn the main melody isolated and then learn to embellish it myself).

Think you guys can provide me some melodies/tabs to learn. If there are any better and/or standards for beginners, please tell me. Also is "Fly Me to the Moon" a good choice for beginners (I'm an anime fan)?
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#6
If you -need- tabs, your ear isn't developing. "Fly Me to the Moon" would be a great place to start transcribing tunes, which is an essential part of learning the sound of jazz.

I don't want to overwhelm or discourage you as a beginner, but going anywhere with jazz really requires you to understand musical things in an abstract sense, much more than the literal sense of where your hands are on the instrument. You have to know how and why progressions work in multiple keys, what the relevant improvisational concepts are, how to play a given chord in dozens of different configurations... You are going to have an exceptionally difficult time with jazz if you intend to do it by ear and tab. Standard notation is the language jazz is written in, and there really isn't much material written in other formats. You may find some standards in tab, but tabs are nonsense when it comes to identifying the concepts in the music.
#7
Sorry but we are not going to waste our time tabbing some melodies when you could learn to do it yourself. Why don't you just learn to read music? If you already know the note names, it's really not hard to learn to read it on a basic level (and that's really all you need to be able to figure out how the melody goes). You need to put some effort in learning it yourself. If you find out that there are no jazz tabs, you need to use another way to figure the melodies out. Either use your ears or learn to read sheet music. That's how you learn new things - by doing them. Learning to read sheet music is not going to hurt you. It will make you a more versatile musician.

Fly Me to the Moon is one of the most popular jazz standards. I think it's a good song to start with.


Also, you could just use your ears and learn the songs by ear. Something like Fly Me to the Moon should be really easy to learn by ear. It's based on a descending scale and a couple of sequences.


If you want to learn some jazz standards, just get a Real Book.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
If you're an ear player learn the songs by ear. Listen to a vocal version of the song a few times a day for a week and then sit down and just play the thing by ear. It's easy and effective.
#9
Got any really easy Jazz Standards that are simple and even a jazz amateur should be able to handle? I'm trying to learn Jazz mainly on bass so keep that in mind. Also any basics to Jazz bass I should know about?
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#10
If it is bass you are trying to learn, search for the concepts of walking bass, especially for jazz standards. Get very used with chromaticism and using half-steps to approach chord tones.

My suggestion for studying jazz standards on bass:
1 - figure out the melody by ear; if necessary, check it with a real book afterwards.
2 - figure out the chords and play them on bass (if you don't know/usually don't use chords on bass, here is a perfect opportunity to study them)
3 - start trying to build a bass line using walking bass concepts. Walking bass lines are quite commonly improvised, but either try learning some by ear or try writing some down prior to improvising to get yourself familiarized with that sort of "language"

"Fly me to the moon" would be a great start: simple melody, simple harmony, and not too fast. You can even use the version in the credits of Evangelion, it is quite easy to learn.
Quote by Xiaoxi
The Byzantine scale was useful until the Ottoman scale came around and totally annihilated it.
Last edited by mrkeka at Dec 7, 2015,
#11
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ilh4uMAdss8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dm31tl5O-h4

Basically with just chord tones and chromatic approach notes you can get pretty far. Walking bass is really not that much about the notes that you play - nobody really pays that much attention to the individual notes, as long as they sound good against the chords and it sounds like the bassline is moving and not just staying in one place all the time. It needs to have a good feel to it. It needs to groove (just like all basslines). I think it's better to keep it simple note choice wise and play a good groove than focus on the "cool" notes. Because if your main focus is on the cool notes, you will not pay that much attention to the groove which is usually the bassist's main purpose - to play good grooves.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#12
Quote by MaggaraMarine
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ilh4uMAdss8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dm31tl5O-h4

Basically with just chord tones and chromatic approach notes you can get pretty far. Walking bass is really not that much about the notes that you play - nobody really pays that much attention to the individual notes, as long as they sound good against the chords and it sounds like the bassline is moving and not just staying in one place all the time. It needs to have a good feel to it. It needs to groove (just like all basslines). I think it's better to keep it simple note choice wise and play a good groove than focus on the "cool" notes. Because if your main focus is on the cool notes, you will not pay that much attention to the groove which is usually the bassist's main purpose - to play good grooves.


I love this guy's videos! RonaldPoe, do check them out!
Quote by Xiaoxi
The Byzantine scale was useful until the Ottoman scale came around and totally annihilated it.