#1
Does anyone know of any good sweep picking exercises and lessons? It's something that's been missing from my arsenal for a while and I've resolved to learn it. Also, what string guages work best for sweeping? Heavier or lighter? Post a link to anything you got. Thanks.
Originally posted by Joshua Garcia
I just come here to dick around.
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My D is major
#3
1. You need to focus 80% on your pick (hard pick works best). So play only open strings at first, no fretting hand involved.

2. Study your picking hand movements. You need to mute the strings you are NOT playing so that only ONE note can be heard at any time during the sweep.

This means:
* mute the high strings (string 1 and 2, for example) with your picking hand fingers (middle, ring, and pinkie)
* do not anchor your fingers on the guitar, instead let them gently touch the strings you are not playing
* mute the low strings with your thumb (strings 4, 5, and 6)
* only ONE string should not be muted - the one you are playing (string 3)

3. Move your arm up and down across the strings keeping everything else perfectly still.

Your arm moves your hand evenly and slowly across the strings up and down. You hand just holds the pick. If your muting is correct, only one note gets played, then the next note, then the next. Only ONE note at a time! As soon as you play note #2, you need to mute note #1.

This is easier said than done.

PRACTICE:

Step 1: Feel how it feels to hold your thumb against the strings, and move your arm up and down so your thumb brushes the strings. Do not hold the pick in your hand for this step.

Step 2: Add your other fingers to the motion. Find the sweet spot so that ONE string is open, and every other string is muted. Do not hold the pick.

Step 3: Keep moving your ARM up and down. Your hand just moves along with it, keeping that nice little groove shape, so only ONE string can be heard at any time.

Step 4: Put your pick in between your fingers, but NOT pointing out. Just hold it so the point is not sticking out, and keep practicing the motions.

Step 5: Let the pick stick out a tiny bit. Now you can start to hear notes ringing out as you move your ARM up and down... again only ONE note can be heard. The other notes are muted.

Step 6: Let the pick stick out all the way. If you have practiced everything correctly you should have a decent sweep sound as you move your ARM up and down.

You should learn about the THUMB MUTING technique.
You should learn 3 string arpeggios.
You should get a real guitar teacher to show you how to sweep pick... 98% of self taught players have no chance at truly being able to sweep properly. They usually are doing something that sort of resembles a sweep, but not nearly the right thing.
#4
Quote by maltmn
1. You need to focus 80% on your pick (hard pick works best). So play only open strings at first, no fretting hand involved.

2. Study your picking hand movements. You need to mute the strings you are NOT playing so that only ONE note can be heard at any time during the sweep.

This means:
* mute the high strings (string 1 and 2, for example) with your picking hand fingers (middle, ring, and pinkie)
* do not anchor your fingers on the guitar, instead let them gently touch the strings you are not playing
* mute the low strings with your thumb (strings 4, 5, and 6)
* only ONE string should not be muted - the one you are playing (string 3)

3. Move your arm up and down across the strings keeping everything else perfectly still.

Your arm moves your hand evenly and slowly across the strings up and down. You hand just holds the pick. If your muting is correct, only one note gets played, then the next note, then the next. Only ONE note at a time! As soon as you play note #2, you need to mute note #1.

This is easier said than done.

PRACTICE:

Step 1: Feel how it feels to hold your thumb against the strings, and move your arm up and down so your thumb brushes the strings. Do not hold the pick in your hand for this step.

Step 2: Add your other fingers to the motion. Find the sweet spot so that ONE string is open, and every other string is muted. Do not hold the pick.

Step 3: Keep moving your ARM up and down. Your hand just moves along with it, keeping that nice little groove shape, so only ONE string can be heard at any time.

Step 4: Put your pick in between your fingers, but NOT pointing out. Just hold it so the point is not sticking out, and keep practicing the motions.

Step 5: Let the pick stick out a tiny bit. Now you can start to hear notes ringing out as you move your ARM up and down... again only ONE note can be heard. The other notes are muted.

Step 6: Let the pick stick out all the way. If you have practiced everything correctly you should have a decent sweep sound as you move your ARM up and down.

You should learn about the THUMB MUTING technique.
You should learn 3 string arpeggios.
You should get a real guitar teacher to show you how to sweep pick... 98% of self taught players have no chance at truly being able to sweep properly. They usually are doing something that sort of resembles a sweep, but not nearly the right thing.


+1

Arm movement comes from the elbow, rather than the shoulder. (at least for me).

Having made contact with a string using the above, if you are going to play more notes on that string, use your wrist (small motion) for moving the pick up and down.

I also found that I had friction problems where my underarm and thumb pad were sticking very slightly on the guitar body ... and by covering up with a long sleeve, literally gripped into my palm, the difference in control was remarkable. That showed the mechanics of the technique were working, and it was friction holding me back.

But that's a temporary solution. The real answer was to be in contact with the guitar body as lightly as possible. As my arm is heavy. that's challenging for me without putting tension somewhere else.
#5
You might try holding the guitar in between your legs in classical position rather than on your picking side leg. That position tends to make picking, especially sweep picking much more difficult because your arm needs to cock back rather than relax into a good position.