#1
This may be too low-tech a question for this forum I'm looking at getting my 11 year old daughter something to record her playing to help her with practicing; she is playing an acoustic guitar. Her teacher recommended that she record herself playing and listen to see what she needs to work on. If she could also record herself playing our (analogue) piano and maybe be able to mess around with mixing them on a computer, I think she would enjoy that.

Any recommendations? My phone has a voice recording function but it does a terrible job. I'm not sure if somethng like this or this would do the trick.
#2
hum I don't know much about different types of recording devices
but you could just download audacity and use it to record.. if the mic on the computer is not too bad it would sound decent and it's free. you can record over your first recording and put stuff together
hope I helped
#3
Christmas is coming so you may want to consider something like a Tascam or Zoom handheld recorder. They record to an SD card so you can record, pop the card into a computer and down load the free Audacity software that contains effects like reverb, chorus, compression etc. It's a nice way to start learning about recording and mixing. See links below.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/portable-field-recorders/zoom-h1-handy-recorder?pfm=sp

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/portable-field-recorders/tascam-dr-05-solid-state-recorder

http://audacityteam.org/
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Dec 1, 2015,
#5
Thanks for the ideas -- I will try out the software. It looks like it would be fun to mess around on. That Boss Micro would be handy if she decides to try electric guitar down the road, since you can hook it up to one.
#6
The Boss has also built in condenser microphone and for $60 beats all the other ones on price. The recording is on SD card and can be imported in the PC for further tweaking.

Another option - just go straight to PC with a usb condenser mic, record to something like Audacity.
#7
Quote by blueturtle
This may be too low-tech a question for this forum I'm looking at getting my 11 year old daughter something to record her playing to help her with practicing; she is playing an acoustic guitar. Her teacher recommended that she record herself playing and listen to see what she needs to work on. If she could also record herself playing our (analogue) piano and maybe be able to mess around with mixing them on a computer, I think she would enjoy that.

Any recommendations? My phone has a voice recording function but it does a terrible job. I'm not sure if somethng like this or this would do the trick.


Get her an ipod touch - it will provide 100 times more functionality and will probably sound much better. Those digital recorders are abysmal obsolete tech.
#8
Quote by reverb66
Get her an ipod touch - it will provide 100 times more functionality and will probably sound much better. Those digital recorders are abysmal obsolete tech.


You can get microphone attachments for the ipod touch - if you need a quality boost. That being said, if she's just learning to play around the ipod should be fine. Eventually get her a proper audio interface.

I use my iphone 4s to record ideas all the time. For working on ideas and simply monitoring progress it works great - it ends up being much easier to use than a digital recorder because of the touch screen.
#9
Hmmm, that would work, too, and she would love that kind of a device, I'm sure. Would an android device work? Are there microphones I can hook up to an android device? I'm obviously not up on tech -- it wouldn't have occurred to me that I could hook up a microphone to anything that didn't have a plug meant for a microphone.
#10
Quote by blueturtle
Hmmm, that would work, too, and she would love that kind of a device, I'm sure. Would an android device work? Are there microphones I can hook up to an android device? I'm obviously not up on tech -- it wouldn't have occurred to me that I could hook up a microphone to anything that didn't have a plug meant for a microphone.


Ya there are. Android has a bit of a delay in audio though still, last time I checked anyway, so listening, and then recording a layer straight on the device while auditioning it, might not work so well. You could listen from something else, and record and then mix later though. You could get a tablet, but other than that, an android non-phone might be tough to find these days. I know they had those, but I'm not sure they still do. There are phones in the price range of an ipod touch though.

I would definitely go that route. The mic on one of those might be good enough out of the box. Acoustic piano is tough to record and mix, so no matter what mic you get you will have issues, but cheaper mics will clip more easily, especially if you record too close. Piano is loud, and eats up the whole frequency spectrum, so it interferes with everything you layer on top, unless you EQ in such a way that it doesn't.

I would get reaper rather than audacity for mixing as well. It is free for a month full trial, and then still fully unlocked, but with a 5 second nag screen reminding you that you haven't paid for the 60$ license that's good for 2 whole version upgrades. So, an amazing deal for a program she knows, if she decides to really get into it. It is not an industry standard, but it is professional grade. Audacity has annoying shortcomings.
#11
Quote by reverb66
Get her an ipod touch - it will provide 100 times more functionality and will probably sound much better. Those digital recorders are abysmal obsolete tech.




No. Just No.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#12
OK, thanks so much for all the help, everyone. We will start out with the free software and the voice recorder on my mp3 player or maybe a better phone. We will add to it down the road if she keeps up her interest in it. That simplifies things for us a lot.
#13
Quote by Arby911


No. Just No.


Have you ever even used one of those digital voice recorders? They're terrible. The iphone/ipod mic is better, has limiting built in making it dummy-proof, and at least you have a device that can be used for other things and that has a coherent user interface.
#14
If the recorder is strictly listed as a digital voice recorder I'd pass on it. They do have a limited fidelity that's why they are called "voice recorders". That's why I suggested the Tascam or Zoom recorders that I listed. They have full frequency response 20 to 40,000Khz with 24 bit/96khz resolution, built in condenser mics and are very good quality.

Personally I'd like go further and recommend the Tascam DP-6 an excellent six track digital recorder for under $120. I hesitate only because someone with no experience in recording or elaborate digital menus would have some start up issues. I have one that I use as a quick audio notepad and to record my band live. I have used Tascam recorders since the mid 70's and still use a Tascam 24 track digital recorder so I didn't have any difficulty but for 1st timers it may seem a little over the top.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Dec 3, 2015,
#15
The Android devices are slowly coming along, however, you'll have to buy one that supports direct usb connection, so you will have to read up on that. IK Multimedia sell interfaces for them, and even some mic options.

If there'll be a laptop in the room look up the USB microphones, you can definitely get much better results here for around $50, Samson, Audio Technica, MXL, Blue - all legitimate brands that will deliver a full audio spectrum and much better than little dictaphone recorder. I think there are some bundled with recording software already, there was one with Cakewalk LE that I saw on that list. Just pick within your budget, we'd be happy to help you narrow it down.
#16
I've got to be honest, I bought a fairly high quality recorder (one of the Zoom recorders), and it was the most pointless thing I ever spent money on, I returned it after a few days of trying. If you want to examine your playing under a microscope and play around with some mixing, you're much better off getting a microphone and an interface so that you get high quality recordings that could one day be close to studio quality with some knowledge along the line. If you just want a fairly accurate representation of sound to help you improve, your daughter might as well use the camera on your phone, or her phone if and when she gets one. Voice recorders are generally the awkward in-between where it's slightly better than a phone, but you'd never want to mix the audio from it, and it's not as readily to hand as your phone is, so for me, it doesn't justify the extra cost.