#1
Hi,

A year ago I bought a B.C. Rich Bich with stock B.C. Rich pick-ups.
At first I liked the sound a lot because I was playing on my own and the sound was not harsh at all, but after thinking about it and trying it in a band or recording situation it sound rather dull and doesn't stick out.

What do you think about the stock pick-ups in B.C. Rich guitars (<500$) ?
In my epiphone les paul I replaced the stock epiphone pups with Seymour Duncans and it sounds great. Can I expect a similar tone when I do the same for B.C. Rich? Or does the wood and other components affect the tone A LOT ?
#2
What amp and pedals (if any) are you using? That's the most important part of your sound...

Also, which type of music are you playing? Rock? Metal? Blues? Other?

No, wood doesn't matters that much. And not at all in high gain situations.
Last edited by DanyFS at Dec 1, 2015,
#4
well it depends as BC Rich has used a couple of different pups as stock. most have the BDSM pickups which aren't terrible for a stock pickup on chaper guitars but won't win any awards either. it's also rumoured that while the pickups are all labeled BDSM that they aren't all the same depending on the model (more expensive ones get beter pickups). i have an Eagle with them and they work for me however i use it mainly for hard rock and blues. i also don't use a ton of gain. with high gain they tend to be pretty meh overall.

as for replacing them it may or may not sound like your epi but my guess is not exactly the same, depending on model of Bich . i'm sure they'll sound good but past that can't promise you anyting.
#5
Wood and other factors affect the tone a lot, but a pickup upgrade will most likely help the sound of your guitar. You have to figure out what sound you have, what you want, and then do some research out there. But you are bound to find pickups that work better for you than stock ones. BTW, what Duncans did you put in your other guitar?
Dave @ Seymour Duncan
#6
Quote by Mincer
Wood and other factors affect the tone a lot, but a pickup upgrade will most likely help the sound of your guitar. You have to figure out what sound you have, what you want, and then do some research out there. But you are bound to find pickups that work better for you than stock ones. BTW, what Duncans did you put in your other guitar?


Not so much on an electric. Wood affects tone to some degree, because everything that the guitar is composed of does, but it's not nearly to the degree that some like to pretend it is. "A lot", while wildly vague, probably isn't an appropriate descriptor.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#7
Quote by DanyFS
What amp and pedals (if any) are you using? That's the most important part of your sound...

Also, which type of music are you playing? Rock? Metal? Blues? Other?

No, wood doesn't matters that much. And not at all in high gain situations.


I'm using a JCM 900 combo amp. I play mostly rock music and a bit of metal.
#8
Quote by Mincer
Wood and other factors affect the tone a lot, but a pickup upgrade will most likely help the sound of your guitar. You have to figure out what sound you have, what you want, and then do some research out there. But you are bound to find pickups that work better for you than stock ones. BTW, what Duncans did you put in your other guitar?


I replaced those a long time ago. If i remember correctly they were alnico pro II. Because I was a Slash Fanboy at the time
#9
Quote by monwobobbo
well it depends as BC Rich has used a couple of different pups as stock. most have the BDSM pickups which aren't terrible for a stock pickup on chaper guitars but won't win any awards either. it's also rumoured that while the pickups are all labeled BDSM that they aren't all the same depending on the model (more expensive ones get beter pickups). i have an Eagle with them and they work for me however i use it mainly for hard rock and blues. i also don't use a ton of gain. with high gain they tend to be pretty meh overall.

as for replacing them it may or may not sound like your epi but my guess is not exactly the same, depending on model of Bich . i'm sure they'll sound good but past that can't promise you anyting.


Thanks for the response. Exactly the same is not necessary, but "similar" is what I'm searching for, I guess I just want some more in the upper to high frequency range. It shouldn't sound dull anymore because then I don't stick out at all in a band situation. Even with EQ.
#10
Quote by slash&angus
Thanks for the response. Exactly the same is not necessary, but "similar" is what I'm searching for, I guess I just want some more in the upper to high frequency range. It shouldn't sound dull anymore because then I don't stick out at all in a band situation. Even with EQ.


interesting. LPs aren't exactly known for their treble response. i don't have any problems cutting through with my Eagle. what amp and settings are you using. do you use an overdrive?
#11
Quote by monwobobbo
interesting. LPs aren't exactly known for their treble response. i don't have any problems cutting through with my Eagle. what amp and settings are you using. do you use an overdrive?

I use the overdrive section from my JCM 900 combo. No pedals.

How would I look for pick-ups, it's hard to predict what they would sound like in a guitar.
#12
Quote by Arby911
Not so much on an electric. Wood affects tone to some degree, because everything that the guitar is composed of does, but it's not nearly to the degree that some like to pretend it is. "A lot", while wildly vague, probably isn't an appropriate descriptor.


The same pickup can sound completely different in a different guitar. I have done hundreds of experiments of this myself. It might not be just the wood, and other factors may contribute just as much, but the point is that materials matter.
Dave @ Seymour Duncan
#13
Quote by slash&angus
Hi,

A year ago I bought a B.C. Rich Bich with stock B.C. Rich pick-ups.
At first I liked the sound a lot because I was playing on my own and the sound was not harsh at all, but after thinking about it and trying it in a band or recording situation it sound rather dull and doesn't stick out.

What do you think about the stock pick-ups in B.C. Rich guitars (<500$) ?
In my epiphone les paul I replaced the stock epiphone pups with Seymour Duncans and it sounds great. Can I expect a similar tone when I do the same for B.C. Rich? Or does the wood and other components affect the tone A LOT ?

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/newreply.php?do=newreply&p=33709526#
#14
Quote by slash&angus
I use the overdrive section from my JCM 900 combo. No pedals.

How would I look for pick-ups, it's hard to predict what they would sound like in a guitar.


Most companies have a forum on their site to ask questions to other users, and have some sort of questionnaire that can lead to a few suggestions on their pickup site. Most pickup companies have a YouTube channel too, so you can see and hear something that might be close to what you are looking for.

You can always email the company too.
Dave @ Seymour Duncan
#15
Quote by slash&angus
I use the overdrive section from my JCM 900 combo. No pedals.

How would I look for pick-ups, it's hard to predict what they would sound like in a guitar.


ok but have you tried to change the eq on your amp to compensate? what are your tone settings?

as for pickups well you can get a general idea of what they may sound like but as metnioned the same pickup can sound different in different guitars. waht BC Rich exactly are you playing?
#16
Quote by slash&angus
Thanks for the response. Exactly the same is not necessary, but "similar" is what I'm searching for, I guess I just want some more in the upper to high frequency range. It shouldn't sound dull anymore because then I don't stick out at all in a band situation. Even with EQ.



How about sticking some actives in there?

I have a JCM900 and never had any trouble standing out with that one.

If you go to Dimarzio and SD, they have pickup selector options where you put your guitar wood, etc. and it will generate possible options.
#17
Quote by monwobobbo
ok but have you tried to change the eq on your amp to compensate? what are your tone settings?

as for pickups well you can get a general idea of what they may sound like but as metnioned the same pickup can sound different in different guitars. waht BC Rich exactly are you playing?


I tried to change the eq by using more presence and treble but then it just gets unpleasant. The guitar is a B.C. Rich Bich NJ series. I bought it second hand.
#18
Quote by diabolical
How about sticking some actives in there?

I have a JCM900 and never had any trouble standing out with that one.

If you go to Dimarzio and SD, they have pickup selector options where you put your guitar wood, etc. and it will generate possible options.


Thanks for the tip. I have EMG's in another guitar. They sound pretty great, even for cleans they are okay.
#19
Quote by Mincer
Most companies have a forum on their site to ask questions to other users, and have some sort of questionnaire that can lead to a few suggestions on their pickup site. Most pickup companies have a YouTube channel too, so you can see and hear something that might be close to what you are looking for.

You can always email the company too.


Thanks for helping.
#20
The NJ is quite good, probably best you'd get from BCRich nowadays.

I am thinking it is possible that you could use a tone booster/overdrive/eq in front to fine tune your sound.

It is possible the amp tubes are probably old and a retube will bring the clarity and crunch back. I'd probably start from there, but OD will probably be the quickest/cheapest fix. Try Boss SD-1 or OD-3 as they are quite cheap and pair well with JCM900. I love the Marshall Jackhammer or Guvnor ODs with the JCM900 but you'll have to buy used.

You can also try this tubescreamer knockoff, it is getting great reviews and won't hurt at $30:
Joyo Vintage OD
Last edited by diabolical at Dec 5, 2015,
#21
Thanks for the info guys. I'm going to take the guitar to the next rehearsal and try some suggestions.