#1
I've found 2 used Warwick basses I'm interested in, 1 is a German made Corvette in "good" condition and is a 4 string. And the other is a German made Thumb that is a 5 string and looks to be in better cosmetic shape. The Thumb for sure is a neck through and not sure about the Corvette. The Corvette is also alot cheaper at $774 vs $1,999 for the Thumb. Would having the additional range of the 5 string be worth paying more? (It's also in better cosmetic shape which makes the price alot higher.) Just wanting some opinions on the matter.
#2
Can you try both basses, hands on? Since you are buying used, I assume you are expecting some cosmetic wear, which means that unless one is in much worse shape than the other you can probably push this aside as a deciding factor.

If you are able, I would play both basses and pay attention to the feel and tone. If you are unable (e.g. online purchase) then I would suggest you try to play one of each model in your local music store, if they have them. If you cannot do either, then the decision is a little more difficult. Online purchases always carry a little risk.

Youtube is a decent source to hear the general tone of each model IF you have good speakers or headphones. Is 4 vs. 5 string part of the decision for you?
#3
Well I'm buying from Guitar Center so I have some time to take it home and take it back if I don't like it. But both basses are from different stores across the country unfortunately. So trying them both is out of the question. And yes, I expect some cosmetic flaws, so that's not as big of a deal, other than makes one worth less which could save me money. And yes, I'm not sure whether I'll need the extra range of a 5 string or not. I understand you get the B string, but not sure I'd ever need it.
#4
I really cannot make a recommendation for you regarding 4 vs. 5 strings, since this is a personal choice. I have never played 5 string. I have never had a need for it and after playing 4 strings for 37 years now, the 5th string gets in the way (for me). You can also drop-tune the E string on a 4 string bass down to D with no problem, and sometimes down to C before it starts to sound too muddy or make too much noise (buzz).

Otherwise, I would choose based on feel and tone. Not sure if this is helpful?
#5
Quote by cthulhucometh
And yes, I'm not sure whether I'll need the extra range of a 5 string or not. I understand you get the B string, but not sure I'd ever need it.


When I first got into bass, my first guitar was, predictably, a Fender four-string with passive P&J pickups. It was a cheapie with pirate skull and crossbone graphics. And honestly, it'll do probably 95% of all the music you'll ever play bass on.

Sometime after that, a Carvin LB75 (5-string neck-through active pickups) showed up.
For a while, I used the bottom string as a thumb rest. After a time, and as I began doing more complicated bass runs, etc., the bottom string came in very handy. While there IS some extra range there, I don't use it all that much for the range. Mostly when I'm visiting the B string, I'm up the fretboard, essentially within the range of the four. But the extra string allows me to stay in one position for chords and arpeggios and runs that would normally force me to slide down the bass to collect the bottom note.
#6
Quote by dspellman
When I first got into bass, my first guitar was, predictably, a Fender four-string with passive P&J pickups. It was a cheapie with pirate skull and crossbone graphics. And honestly, it'll do probably 95% of all the music you'll ever play bass on.

Sometime after that, a Carvin LB75 (5-string neck-through active pickups) showed up.
For a while, I used the bottom string as a thumb rest. After a time, and as I began doing more complicated bass runs, etc., the bottom string came in very handy. While there IS some extra range there, I don't use it all that much for the range. Mostly when I'm visiting the B string, I'm up the fretboard, essentially within the range of the four. But the extra string allows me to stay in one position for chords and arpeggios and runs that would normally force me to slide down the bass to collect the bottom note.

I've owned one bass before and it was that exact same Fender.
So a 5 string does have some advantages, but they aren't exactly huge advantages?
#7
Quote by smtp4me
I really cannot make a recommendation for you regarding 4 vs. 5 strings, since this is a personal choice. I have never played 5 string. I have never had a need for it and after playing 4 strings for 37 years now, the 5th string gets in the way (for me). You can also drop-tune the E string on a 4 string bass down to D with no problem, and sometimes down to C before it starts to sound too muddy or make too much noise (buzz).

Otherwise, I would choose based on feel and tone. Not sure if this is helpful?

I've looked at alot of the music I listen to and alot of it is already tuned down to a drop D on a 4 string. So unless I specifically look for music where a 5 string is needed it sounds like a 5 string is more less over-kill.