#1
Hi guys

I buddy of mine told me that loosening the strings of a guitar is a must if you are going to store it for a long time. But there are a loads of contrasting views of people on the internet. I am just confused.
I have to leave my place for a few months and just cannot take my guitar with me. So what do you guys suggest? Should i loosen the strings or not?
#3
Yup. Leave it tuned, put it in a case.

I usually advise tossing a VCI (Vapor corrosion inhibitor) emitter into the case as well. That'll help preserve the metal bits *and* the finish. See theruststore.com for examples.

I wax my guitars using a carnauba (not silicone) wax. Finish and metal bits (except for frets).

I suggest putting a piece of hard plastic (thin and long) between the frets and the strings. This prevents fret wear from a case lid pushing down on strings which are then grinding into frets. In addition, it eliminates electrical pathways which can lead to corrosion.
#4
Quote by dspellman
Yup. Leave it tuned, put it in a case.

I usually advise tossing a VCI (Vapor corrosion inhibitor) emitter into the case as well. That'll help preserve the metal bits *and* the finish. See theruststore.com for examples.

I wax my guitars using a carnauba (not silicone) wax. Finish and metal bits (except for frets).


^ Solid

I suggest putting a piece of hard plastic (thin and long) between the frets and the strings. This prevents fret wear from a case lid pushing down on strings which are then grinding into frets. In addition, it eliminates electrical pathways which can lead to corrosion.


You have any sourcing I could read on this^ (seriously not being an ass) or is that just your personal thinking? I've never heard of current running through a guitar that wasn't plugged up or it causing corrosion.

I know if you have Active pickups it's probably wise to remove the battery from the cavity, slight chance that could go bad and cause corrosion/ explode and do damage while in the case for an extended period of time.

I have heard of storing an instrument in a damp area such as a basement or outdoor shed, garage in a case and it becoming corroded , neck warp due to extreme temps one way or another, but never in a temperature controlled environment.
My newest addition,
2007 Dean Cadi-KILL (Cannibal Corpse) Rob Barrett Signature model to see more of my gear visit my profile.
#5
I'de like to hear from some builders on this,
most people leave it tuned to pitch,
I am thinking it would relieve some of the stress on the table (which tends to pull up after years,) to tune it down a step, but haven't verified that yet (acoustic)
sunaj
#6
Quote by Ikillintel
^ Solid


You have any sourcing I could read on this^ (seriously not being an ass) or is that just your personal thinking? I've never heard of current running through a guitar that wasn't plugged up or it causing corrosion.


You fell asleep during your chemistry classes, didn't you?
Current can be generated chemically or magnetically -- you don't need to plug something in to an amp or to the wall. Most all chemical reactions are actually electrical. Due to dissimilar metals in guitars, and chemical reactions from case glue solvents, etc., small electrical currents are happening all the time.

You'll often see a stored guitar with black marks where the strings met the frets. Those are from electrical circuits. We just had one of those (a 2013 SG that was mostly stored) at MyLesPaul a week or two ago. Check this out: http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/other-gibsons/354192-2013-sg-frets-rusted-case-how.html



The fret protector also prevents the strings gouging the frets (or the stainless frets flattening the strings) should the guitar in its case flop over on its face.

All that said, ESP ships a lot of its guitars with a piece of plastic (looks like a tie) between the strings and the frets. So does Tom Anderson. So does Suhr. You *have* seen them, yes?



http://global.rakuten.com/en/store/k-gakki/item/esp-fp-gb/

http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/271828466593?ul_noapp=true&chn=ps&lpid=82

This from Customer Service at Suhr:

"Just to be on the safe side, we recommend using the fret protector every time the guitar is put in its case. It's a sad day when a perfect fret job is ruined because of a small mishap."
_________________
Last edited by dspellman at Dec 8, 2015,
#7
Quote by sunaj
I'de like to hear from some builders on this,
most people leave it tuned to pitch,
I am thinking it would relieve some of the stress on the table (which tends to pull up after years,) to tune it down a step, but haven't verified that yet (acoustic)
sunaj


You should be able to contact Carvin, Taylor and Suhr easily enough if you're in California.
Since this was left in the Electric Guitar forum and not in the acoustic, you're getting answers that apply to electrics.
I have a '67 335-12 string that I've left tuned to pitch roughly forever, and its neck is perfectly straight (okay, I'm only using 8's on it, but still).
#8
Quote by dspellman
You fell asleep during your chemistry classes, didn't you?
Current can be generated chemically or magnetically -- you don't need to plug something in to an amp or to the wall. Most all chemical reactions are actually electrical. Due to dissimilar metals in guitars, and chemical reactions from case glue solvents, etc., small electrical currents are happening all the time.

You'll often see a stored guitar with black marks where the strings met the frets. Those are from electrical circuits. We just had one of those (a 2013 SG that was mostly stored) at MyLesPaul a week or two ago. Check this out: http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/other-gibsons/354192-2013-sg-frets-rusted-case-how.html



The fret protector also prevents the strings gouging the frets (or the stainless frets flattening the strings) should the guitar in its case flop over on its face.

All that said, ESP ships a lot of its guitars with a piece of plastic (looks like a tie) between the strings and the frets. So does Tom Anderson. So does Suhr. You *have* seen them, yes?



http://global.rakuten.com/en/store/k-gakki/item/esp-fp-gb/

http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/271828466593?ul_noapp=true&chn=ps&lpid=82

This from Customer Service at Suhr:

"Just to be on the safe side, we recommend using the fret protector every time the guitar is put in its case. It's a sad day when a perfect fret job is ruined because of a small mishap."
_________________


A great piece of information there. Anyways thank you guys for your suggestions.
#9
Quote by dspellman
You should be able to contact Carvin, Taylor and Suhr easily enough if you're in California.
Since this was left in the Electric Guitar forum and not in the acoustic, you're getting answers that apply to electrics.
I have a '67 335-12 string that I've left tuned to pitch roughly forever, and its neck is perfectly straight (okay, I'm only using 8's on it, but still).


Thank you for the correction and the info,
I have always kept mine tuned to pitch and usually have periodic maintenance so I really haven't had to store a guitar that long w/o playing it/having it serviced,
I see where that would not be an issue with a solid body guitar, use of the spacer between strings is right on too
sunaj
Last edited by sunaj at Dec 8, 2015,
#10
But how about classical nylon string guitars? As you may already know, these traditionally don't have truss rods, so I think slackening the strings might be helpful for protecting the neck from excessive string tension during storage. I did this to my old classical guitar that I won't be using anytime soon.
#11
Quote by dspellman
You fell asleep during your chemistry classes, didn't you?
Current can be generated chemically or magnetically -- you don't need to plug something in to an amp or to the wall. Most all chemical reactions are actually electrical. Due to dissimilar metals in guitars, and chemical reactions from case glue solvents, etc., small electrical currents are happening all the time.

You'll often see a stored guitar with black marks where the strings met the frets. Those are from electrical circuits. We just had one of those (a 2013 SG that was mostly stored) at MyLesPaul a week or two ago. Check this out: http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/other-gibsons/354192-2013-sg-frets-rusted-case-how.html



The fret protector also prevents the strings gouging the frets (or the stainless frets flattening the strings) should the guitar in its case flop over on its face.

All that said, ESP ships a lot of its guitars with a piece of plastic (looks like a tie) between the strings and the frets. So does Tom Anderson. So does Suhr. You *have* seen them, yes?



http://global.rakuten.com/en/store/k-gakki/item/esp-fp-gb/

http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/271828466593?ul_noapp=true&chn=ps&lpid=82

This from Customer Service at Suhr:

"Just to be on the safe side, we recommend using the fret protector every time the guitar is put in its case. It's a sad day when a perfect fret job is ruined because of a small mishap."
_________________

Actually no, I've never ran into this problem because I've never really "stored" a guitar in its case longer than a few days for travel. This is great info and thanks for sourcing it. I've never seen those fret protectors either nice! Hey we learn something new everyday man, I've been playing on and off for little more than 20 yrs, I've never kept more than 6 guitars at once and all usually hung and played regularly as I play a lot of different tunings. Awesome post man!

Edit** As for chemistry class , sometimes, but I passed, it was the early 90's bro!
My newest addition,
2007 Dean Cadi-KILL (Cannibal Corpse) Rob Barrett Signature model to see more of my gear visit my profile.
Last edited by Ikillintel at Dec 8, 2015,
#12
Quote by Ikillintel


Edit** As for chemistry class , sometimes, but I passed, it was the early 90's bro!


I have a Chemistry degree from when there were only a few elements in the periodic table.
#13
It's called 'bi-metallic' corrosion and, luckily for us, aerospace engineers take it quite seriously
#14
Quote by SpiderM
It's called 'bi-metallic' corrosion and, luckily for us, aerospace engineers take it quite seriously


Thanks; I was looking for the word. The LBGT community was taking up the search space whenever I put "bi" up.
#15
Quote by dspellman
Thanks; I was looking for the word. The LBGT community was taking up the search space whenever I put "bi" up.


Yeah, you have to be careful at times