#1
I don't know if I'm phrasing the question correctly, but i want to know the different ways to compose music based on theory. I know that cantus firmus is one. What are the other different ways to compose?
Last edited by J23L at Dec 7, 2015,
#2
Chords and melody(melody + homophonic chords on the background), four or more part texture(more or less contrapuntal), monophonic texture, melody and countermelody with chordal accompaniment

I don't really know what you're looking for. It's such a broad question and there are so many things you can base the composition on. Regardless of the style, you will want to have a good form. I don't mean copying a certain one, but just having one that makes sense. The parts of the song must flow naturally into each other.

Also one thing that universally helps is good voice leading.

You'll find most music nowadays is melody + chordal accompaniment, either arpeggiated in some way or not.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Dec 7, 2015,
#3
Quote by Elintasokas
Chords and melody(melody + homophonic chords on the background), four or more part texture(more or less contrapuntal), monophonic texture, melody and countermelody with chordal accompaniment

Thanks for this. I will study a bit of this stuff since it's somewhat new to me. I know the question I asked is hard to answer, but i don't really know how to phrase it better. I basically just want to know composing techniques. Cantus firmus helped me a lot because it taught me about motion in music (parallel motion, similar motion, contrary motion, etc.). This helped me a lot with making riffs. I was just curious to know other forms of composing.
#4
Quote by J23L
Thanks for this. I will study a bit of this stuff since it's somewhat new to me. I know the question I asked is hard to answer, but i don't really know how to phrase it better. I basically just want to know composing techniques. Cantus firmus helped me a lot because it taught me about motion in music (parallel motion, similar motion, contrary motion, etc.). This helped me a lot with making riffs. I was just curious to know other forms of composing.

I assume by Cantus Firmus you mean you did modal species counterpoint exercises? Well, the next step is to go tonal (functional chord progressions) with that, then you'll have four part harmony.

Btw, you can switch between textures in your piece. It doesn't have to be just one!
Last edited by Elintasokas at Dec 7, 2015,
#5
Serialism. That's very theory based. Though I doubt you want to compose serial music...


You can use theory to describe anything and you can kind of come up with certain kind of "rules" of for example what a good melody is like. But just because your melody meets the criteria of a "good" melody doesn't really mean it is a good melody. That kind of guidelines are just guidelines. They are just common practices that people use a lot in music. The most important thing in composing is coming up with musical ideas. And musical ideas come from you. Theory on its own doesn't really give you musical ideas. You need to use your ears for that. You can of course start with a theoretic concept (and that can be anything - if you have ever taken part in a composition challenge, it's based on certain "rules" that you decide before you start writing anything), but your ear is what decides if it sounds good or not.


Just listen to music, use your ears, get inspired. Analyze music.
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Dec 7, 2015,
#6
^ Yeah, this is good stuff.

Sometimes it's easy to "get stuck" on the theory and forget that music should be about what it sounds like, not about following some theory concept.
#7
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Serialism. That's very theory based. Though I doubt you want to compose serial music...


You can use theory to describe anything and you can kind of come up with certain kind of "rules" of for example what a good melody is like. But just because your melody meets the criteria of a "good" melody doesn't really mean it is a good melody. That kind of guidelines are just guidelines. They are just common practices that people use a lot in music. The most important thing in composing is coming up with musical ideas. And musical ideas come from you. Theory on its own doesn't really give you musical ideas. You need to use your ears for that. You can of course start with a theoretic concept (and that can be anything - if you have ever taken part in a composition challenge, it's based on certain "rules" that you decide before you start writing anything), but your ear is what decides if it sounds good or not.


Just listen to music, use your ears, get inspired. Analyze music.

Yes, I know this, but learning a lot of theory helps me look at composing music differently. I understand theory rules will not always make good music, but I think it can make you a more informed and versatile composer (at least in my case it did). The more I learn about the rules of composing the easier it seems for me to make a song.
#8
Quote by J23L
Yes, I know this, but learning a lot of theory helps me look at composing music differently. I understand theory rules will not always make good music, but I think it can make you a more informed and versatile composer (at least in my case it did). The more I learn about the rules of composing the easier it seems for me to make a song.

This is also true. It will be less luck based and more skill based.

Back when I didn't know theory, I would be very inconsistent, because I didn't really know WHY my idea worked.

But even knowing all the theory is not enough. You need to know how tons of instruments sound and how to arrange them. (Okay, this is largely dependent on the genre )
Last edited by Elintasokas at Dec 7, 2015,