#1
I run my Les Paul into my Scarlett 2i4 and into Amplitube, but like many others I find the tone very unsatisfying. I've heard of people using real tube preamps and running that signal into their computer, as well as running an actual head into a DI(with a dump) and then using cabinet simulation software.

Would either of those methods get close to real tone? If so, is it worth the investment?
Last edited by The Bacon Man at Dec 10, 2015,
#2
Depending on the tones you are after, just getting an amp might be the cheaper option.
There are amps which come with good speaker-sims on-board these days (Laney IRT-studio, H&K Tubemeister) for silent recording.

Some people also run "hardware amp sims" like the Palmer Pocket Amp or any of the various AMT pedals. This is the cheapest option, but going by clips, not necessarily the best one... tends to sound a bit dead or sterile. Probably fine for adding an additional rhythm guitar into a mix, probably not so great when you need a bona-fide guitar tone that can stand on it's own. Search for clips on youtube and see for yourself.

I've personally had good results running a small amp into a loadbox with a speaker-sim in between the two (Palmer PDI-09). It can also be used with line-level signals (so after a preamp or just a distortion pedal) though I haven't experimented with that much yet. It's a pretty versatile sim though.
#4
I don't really like Amplitube's cab simulation, so bypassing it and using IRs might be a better option. You could try that.

You could also check out other amp sims, you have a list of them (among other stuff) in the Recording forum: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1522593

Otherwise, follow the suggestions given by Quailman and diabolical.
Last edited by DanyFS at Dec 11, 2015,
#5
You could try this Software called BIAS, it is supposed to be much better than Amplitube. Its like 10 bucks for iPhone or iPad, and like 80 for PC.
#6
Bias is pretty great. Any amp sim is only as good as the reverb you use along with it - I use H-Reverb from Waves and it sounds really good.
#7
Give Peavey ReValver a whirl. It has a very easy user interface and can be used stand alone or with a DAW.
Guitars:
Ibanez RG1570 Prestige
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#8
Quote by The Bacon Man
I run my Les Paul into my Scarlett 2i4 and into Amplitube, but like many others I find the tone very unsatisfying. I've heard of people using real tube preamps and running that signal into their computer, as well as running an actual head into a DI(with a dump) and then using cabinet simulation software.

Would either of those methods get close to real tone? If so, is it worth the investment?


1. If I were using a tube amp (head), I'd pick up a Two-Notes Torpedo Studio http://www.two-notes.com/en/hardware/torpedo-studio/ It's a load box (resistive and reactive, switchable) and provides dual miking simulation, convolution for speaker simulation, the whole shot.

2. Might as well just get a modeler and free up the computer power. Suggestions include running a Pod (HD series or equivalent) into a Two-Notes Torpedo C.A.B. (for the cabinet sims AND the power amp sims), a Line 6 Helix, one of the Fractal products, one of the Kemper choices, etc.