#1
Hello,

We recently moved out and in the new house on the attic I found a (possible very) old guitar, I was wondering if anyone has a clue what guitar it is (I can't find branding anywhere). The first thing I noted is that it has the neck of a classic Spanish guitar, yet it has steel strings.
I'm considering to fix up this guitar, yet I thought I could better wait until I got something out of this thread before ruining an antique.



Last edited by luke.geelen at Dec 13, 2015,
#3
Quote by TobusRex
Have a picture, brand model, anything like that you can tell us?

I've included pictures in the first post, I cant seem to find anything that indicates the brand.
#4
Quote by luke.geelen
I've included pictures in the first post, I cant seem to find anything that indicates the brand.


I'm not seeing any links. Maybe something is wrong with my browser.

Even without seeing the picture...the description sounds spooky. A classical guitar with steel strings. Ugh. Bet that neck has seen better days.
Last edited by TobusRex at Dec 13, 2015,
#5
Quote by luke.geelen
I've included pictures in the first post, I cant seem to find anything that indicates the brand.
OK, first and foremost, you need to remove that, (those ?) picture(s), and link to much lower resolution copies.

As for the guitar itself, some steel string guitars come with a sort of classical type of head stocks. I think that's why they're nicknamed, 'slot heads'. (Granted that is sort of stating the obvious).

In the case of your particular guitar, it has a classical type of bridge with no intonation slant. Any properly designed steel string flat top with a slot head, would have the intonation slant in the bridge. Basically, those types of guitars appear as 'hybrids'. I actually had a very similar guitar to yours as my first guitar.

Here's a Crafter parlor sized slot head:


Take particular attention to the peg style bridge with slanted saddle, specifically designed for ball end steel strings.

Your guitar is likely a very inexpensive starter model, not correctly designed for steel strings, or shouldn't have steel strings on it in the first place. Don't shoot the messenger...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 13, 2015,
#6
It looks like one of those cheap chain store guitars from the 50s and early 60s. They often used a classical-looking slothead with steel strings. In fact, it might have come with nylon strings - the bridge looks very flimsy for steel strings. A clearer view of the nut slots might give a clue to that.

I would lay long odds that it isn't worth more than a few dollars, and I wouldn't spend anything on it, except maybe convert it to lap steel. Even then I would be afraid of the bridge pulling off with reasonably heavy strings.
#7
Quote by Tony Done
It looks like one of those cheap chain store guitars from the 50s and early 60s. They often used a classical-looking slothead with steel strings. In fact, it might have come with nylon strings - the bridge looks very flimsy for steel strings. A
That's exactly what mine was. Came straight from "Woolworth's". (A five & dime chain store, I seriously if they made it as far as Oz before they went belly up).

Anyway, mine didn't have a pick guard, to further the 'classical illusion', so to speak. I think it had a steel truss rod, don't remember if it could be adjusted.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 13, 2015,
#8
^^^^ I spent my youth in the UK, and we had our fair share of not-good cheapos; it wasn't that long after The Shadows imported the first Fender strats. My first guitar was one such, not wildly different from the one in the pic, except it had a tailpiece (a plus in those guitars) but someone had decorated the top with puke green stripes. Refinishing the top was my first foray into modding, and I haven't looked back since. In fact, I didn't buy a "name" guitar - a Maton - until well after I emigrated to Oz, and maybe 14/15 years after I started playing.
#9


Maybe you had the right color, just the wrong shade?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 14, 2015,
#11
those pictures are so huge i think i had a seizure.

i don't think that is a guitar of quality. all of it's features clearly suggest the opposite.

that pointy headstock though might point it to the harmony/kay part of the world. the big white plastic "golpa plate" looks like something they would do as well as an unbound sunburst.
#12
Looks home made or a school wood shop project. Even the dot neck markers don't line up. Wall art, not a serious player/collectible.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#13
Quote by Cajundaddy
Looks home made or a school wood shop project. Even the dot neck markers don't line up. Wall art, not a serious player/collectible.

Not shure if its good or bad but the dots seem to be stickers, at least I can remove them.
#14
Noting the bridge design and uncompensated saddle I would only use nylon string sets. Classical strings maintain a uniformity of thickness low to high that requires less or no compensation.