#1
So my story is that I have been playing, noodling for about 8 years. Have n't really got to any kind of good standard because I don't play enough and I'm inconsistent, often going off on their hobbies and not playing for weeks or even months at at time.

I have a lovely Washburn wi66 prof, a Taylor go mini and a Yamaha thr 10.

As well as a new guitar I constantly find myself looking for a new amp on the web, but I spend nearly all my time playing the Washburn UNPLUGGED!!!!

I don't like loud. I'm constantly harassing the kids to turn the to down. I don't play the acoustic much partly because it's actually quite loud, even though I choose a smaller to be quieter.

When I do play through the Yamaha I rarely get sounds I'm happy with, but occasionally get sounds I'm very happy with (this could be the strangest part!)

But as I said I am constantly dreaming of and the hunt for my dream amp, bonkers is n't it?!?

But do I really need a Roland blues cube, a line 6 dvt 25, a Laney irt or even a thr 100 hd, or is it just going to be a waste of money sitting in the corner unused.

I'll lie down on the couch and await your advice ;-)
#3
My 2cents.

The acoustic guitars volume and tone is very dependent on the player. How hard you hit the strings to even how close you hold the guitar body to your body. With an electric guitar its easier to get the sound you want and never even consider something like how you lean into it. Not to say it doesn't matter just far less than with an acoustic. So an acoustic amp is really not going to change that, you need to get the tone you want from the acoustic before you can get the tone you want from the acoustic amp.

Nothing wrong with playing the acoustic unplugged, the amp simply acts as a way to increase volume first and foremost. If you want to add reverb and the like however you will need to play with your amp and effects.

Here is what I would do if I was you. What kind of sound do you want from the acoustic guitar? pick someone who has the sound you like, say you want to sound like leo kottke for example. Look at live videos and notice how he holds the guitar. You will find he has the top of the guitar pressed against his chest and the lower half farther out, give that a try. Once I get the sound I like I would then try plugging into an amp. If I am still going for the leo kottke sound I would Keep pretty much all the knobs at standard and not use reverb or chorus, just adjust the volume to a level I like. If I would Estas though I would Push the guitar as far away from my body as possible, add a lot of chorus bass and treble and reverb.

if you want lower volumes don't bother getting a new amp all it does is add more volume, just play softer and use more flesh and less guitar pick/nail hold the guitar close to your body.

Hope that helps. If it doesn't please explain what sound you want or why you want an amp that would really help, but in your case I think its less amp and more technique.

edit: thought I was in the acoustic section.

that is a great amp, if you want a good clean sound, if you want something dirty you need a pedal or else a heavier amp. What tone do you want? If you want low volumes and a good sound that Yamaha is a great amp.
Last edited by Blicer at Dec 13, 2015,
#4
I don't like loud either, and I don't play any louder than acoustic guitar volume. However, I like to put it through a decent amp. Even after a lot of modding, my Epi VJ doesn't sound anywhere near as good as my much bigger H&K, even a those low volumes. So I would say, get a decent amp and speakers. The Roland Cube has a very good reputation, but I'm old fashioned and would save up for a lunchbox tube amp of some kind.
Last edited by Tony Done at Dec 13, 2015,
#5
Quote by Tony Done
I don't like loud either, and I don't play any louder than acoustic guitar volume. However, I like to put it through a decent amp. Even after a lot of modding, my Epi VJ doesn't sound anywhere near as good as my much bigger H&K, even a those low volumes. So I would say, get a decent amp and speakers. The Roland Cube has a very good reputation, but I'm old fashioned and would save up for a lunchbox tube amp of some kind.


You apparently aren't very familiar with the Yamaha THR line. It'll blow most sub $500 tube amps out of the water in versatility and definitely kill the cheap Roland Cube. It is highly rated and reviewed and the OP doesn't like loud, why tell them to get a (bigger) tube amp and speakers?
Moving on.....
Last edited by KenG at Dec 13, 2015,
#6
If your playing through a headset, get a better headset. If you play in very low volumes, you don't necessarily need a big combo amp.. Yamaha THR10 is nice portable modeling amp and you should be able to get some nice tones out of it, depending on your settings (ask other owners of Yamaha THR10 their settings and how to dial in a particular sound, it may be as simple as that). You could always get some pedals to enhance further the sound of your guitar.
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.
Last edited by psp742 at Dec 13, 2015,
#7
Thanks. I think I should probably try to use the thr a bit more and see how I get on. One of my other (many) pet hates is hearing that background buzz from the amp as soon as the guitar is plugged in. When you are looking for it there are a lot of YouTube videos where the guitar get turned right down as soon a some playing stops I 'm looking at you Anderton's. This is quite prominent on the Roland but I've not heard it on the Line 6 Dvt. Furthermore, some of the nicest tones to come out of a YouTube demo are from the dvt so this can be my contingency, in the sales maybe!
#8
Quote by KenG
You apparently aren't very familiar with the Yamaha THR line. It'll blow most sub $500 tube amps out of the water in versatility and definitely kill the cheap Roland Cube. It is highly rated and reviewed and the OP doesn't like loud, why tell them to get a (bigger) tube amp and speakers?


That's true, I can't argue about things I don't know from personal expereince - which is a lot!!!!
#9
The best item I ever bought was a Boss BR600 recording studio. I always use this for home use, you can rig it up to your stereo if you want sound to come from speakers or you can just plug a set of head phones into it.
You have the added bonus of masses of built in effects and simulators and you can use it to record yourself.
Much better than any amp if you're not intending on playing outside of your home.
#10
If amps and acoustics are too loud but the unplugged electric too quiet then electro-acoustic cutaway type guitar unplugged? Rock that unplugged DOT.
The quest for your perfect gear is like being under the surface of a huge, overpowering lake. When you've nearly swam to the light on the surface it shoots far out of your sight again. Still, I'll enjoy the swim. What'd I do if I reached the top?
#11
If the amp gives distortion thats all u need. There are amps with one knob that kick ass. I have a 4 knob amp (reverb gain volume and tone) and it does it all. Its honestly just gotta turn on, increase volume and thats it. Thats an amp lol.

No need for bells and whistles.

If u dont like loud tho get a cheap vox headphone amp lol or stay under 40 watts.
#12
Old thread.
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