#1
Most of Classical guitarist on youtube make a great sound with their finger style and I must say that it's really sound better than any most proffesional out there

Should I give away my electric guitar and take a classical guitar class?
I envy their skill. They not play fast like metal band but it's still sound better than those fast finger.
#2
I have no clue what you're trying to ask, but why not both? I mainly use classical guitars myself, but I use my electric when the situation requires that I need an electric. So why sell it?
#3
Much of clasical guitar training is about "tone production". Classical players study technique as much as they study the music itself.
The actual technique of picking ("plucking", they usually say) the rest stroke, the free stroke, the maintenance of the fingernails, the technique of playing fast tremolo lines which can also be used for very fast single-note lines.

This all takes a lot of dedicated training, usually under a good instructor as well.
#4
It's all up to you. If you like both, play both. You don't have to choose one over the other. Just remember that the classical technique is pretty different from the basic electric guitar technique. But of course, if you are interested in learning to play classical guitar, learn to play it.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
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Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#5
I know people who play electric, acoustic, classical, and lute and sound fantastic on all of them. No, seriously.

It comes down to the construction of the guitar, the different strings, the style of playing that is taught to classical players, and the way classical music is written all contribute to the sound
#6
Quote by MaggaraMarine
It's all up to you. If you like both, play both. You don't have to choose one over the other. Just remember that the classical technique is pretty different from the basic electric guitar technique. But of course, if you are interested in learning to play classical guitar, learn to play it.


Whether you can do both is a matter of fingernail strength, at least in my experience. I played some classical guitar in college, but it's pretty easy to tear those fingernails up even with a pick on steel strings. I think we've had the dispute before, but I'd still argue there's significant overlap in technique at the basic level (obviously there's no bending in classical music). Classical legato and chord technique transfer easily, as long as you practice it. And there's no such thing as "thumb over" grip on classical.

A lot of classical technique isn't just in the motions themselves, but in preparing your hand for whole phrases at a time. Since you're not improvising, you have the opportunity to find the best possible hand/finger placement for what's coming up next in the music. Pre-positioning is a huge point of technique in classical guitar that you can definitely apply to electric, and it really gives you the chance to use your best technique rather than the most convenient technique. After all, there's really no excuse for poor tone, missed notes, etc when you have a score to learn from.

Classical guitar is fun, challenging, and rewarding and it can definitely give you skills that improve your electric playing. The only thing to remember is that classical music demands a focused, patient approach. It's up to you whether you find that kind of intensity and focus enjoyable, but if you do, then classical guitar may be just your thing.