#1
I've been trying to learn a rather challenging (for me) song for quite awhile now with regular practice (daily for months, now maybe once every few days whenever I pick up my acoustic, its to play this song).

Now when I play it with a backing track, I feel like it sounds... okay? But whenever I listen to my own pure sound, I feel like I just sound bad for someone who has practiced this much. While I'm playing live, I feel like I'm doing well, but then when I go back and listen to it, my chord changes sound bad to me and the overall ringing isn't what I want. Am I being too self critical? Should I expect to not sound as good solo and for "the band" to help complete my sound? or should I just be practicing harder.

Recordings below
Layla - with backing track - https://soundcloud.com/concavator/layla-with-backing
Same song - backing track muted - https://soundcloud.com/concavator/layla-without-backing
this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

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Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#2
In my opinion, you can never be too critical of your own playing, unless of coure you have reached perfection. Seriously though, it's not absolutley horrid; it's just not perfect either. keep playing. If you are ever satisfied with your playing, you have either obtained perfection, or you have stopped caring.
Originally posted by Joshua Garcia
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My D is major
#3
Great players are never completely satisfied and struggle listening to their own work. It sounds like timing miscues mostly in this track which is a common problem. Try practicing with just a metronome and play it as relaxed and fluid as possible while still hitting your marks. After spending a little time on this it should sound much better with the track.


For my playing, excellence is the goal, never perfection. "Perfect" is an illusion.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#4
Quote by Cajundaddy
Try practicing with just a metronome


Lol I knew this would come up. I hate metronomes. Like despise them. One of the reasons I like the backing track so much is it helps me keep time, but its actually music too so I can get into it.. unlike a monotonous metronome.

either way.. thanks for the responses.
this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

=======================

Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#5
Quote by mlfarrell
Lol I knew this would come up. I hate metronomes. Like despise them. One of the reasons I like the backing track so much is it helps me keep time, but its actually music too so I can get into it.. unlike a monotonous metronome.

either way.. thanks for the responses.


Make that metronome your bitch!

I don't care for metronomes much either but it is a sure way to get results and really sharpen your sense of timing and meter. The best players use them regularly.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
There are timing issues but nothing you couldn't get away with live. For listening back to yourself try adding a tiny bit of reverb to the guitar, it will help with the notes that just seem dead. Acoustic is pretty unforgiving.
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