#1
I'm looking for some interesting chords that don't go along with the typical
I VI IV V or other common progressions. To go into specifics, I want to have an organ playing legato chords with drums and lyrics in a rock style, but to sound different than most. Kinda like fix you by cold play. Could I get some help?
#2
Do you mean chords for chord progressions that aren't just I IV V or do you mean like extensions or something? It's a very vague question since any chord can sound interesting. It all depends on context.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#3
Check out Jones big ass truck rental and storage facilities on YouTube

You think I'm kidding, don't you
#4
Well you've got ii iii viiº left to use, and key-borrowed chords. The poignancy and effectiveness of a chord change often depends on the voice leading and what expectations are set up by the preceding harmonies. Perfectly normal major triads are plenty interesting if you use them in the right place. You can also use secondary dominants if you just want to spice up a standard diatonic progression.

Take the song "Front Porch" by Umphrey's McGee - D C G F for almost the entire song. What's interesting about that? It borrows C and F from the parallel minor (remember D has two sharps, C# and F#). Not necessarily a though provoking chord sequence, but it definitely gets you out of diatonic writing. The actually interesting part of the song happens near the end, when they break unexpectedly to Bbmaj, bVI, which again is borrowed from the parallel minor.

You don't necessarily need unusual chord qualities or voicings to sound interesting. Thinking outside of the key signature is probably the easiest way to take a step sideways, so to speak.
Last edited by cdgraves at Dec 16, 2015,
#5
interesting..could be voice leading rather than function-minor major9 ..or extensions MA7#11 or chords with the #11 in the bass...Eb/A..and of course the many flavors of dominate altered chords that can have multi-functions F7b9#5 = B9=F#mi7=A6 and stuff like CMA7=Ami9=Eb13#5b9=AbMA7#5#9..

moving one or two voices in chords like these may produces some nice results..experiment..its is endless..if you have access to a keyboard that will help a lot..the moving bass line in cases like this change the flavor of everything
play well

wolf
#6
Quote by bassalloverthe
Check out Jones big ass truck rental and storage facilities on YouTube

You think I'm kidding, don't you


I want to rent a truck..and I don't even need one....
play well

wolf
#7
Quote by wolflen
I want to rent a truck..and I don't even need one....


I'm hoping you found the one with the guitar harmonizing?
#8
Quote by theogonia777
Do you mean chords for chord progressions that aren't just I IV V or do you mean like extensions or something? It's a very vague question since any chord can sound interesting. It all depends on context.

I would like more complicated chord progressions than the I IV V but in all the sense im looking for a dark and heavy sound and regular minor chords dnt do justice in those progressions
#9
Throw a m6 or m2 on your minor chords and you'll get a pretty dark sound. mM7 is also weird sounding, though pretty hard to use except when you really want the mM7 sound. I can't tell you for sure exactly how to use those chords in dark, brooding, metal stuff that I don't listen to, but half steps are a pretty sure route to really tight dissonance.

Really, you should just listen to the music that has the qualities you like and get to work figuring out what they're doing. Use your ear as much possible, look stuff when something is beyond your aural abilities, write your own music using the same concepts...
Last edited by cdgraves at Dec 16, 2015,
#10
Quote by bryangourley8
I would like more complicated chord progressions than the I IV V but in all the sense im looking for a dark and heavy sound and regular minor chords dnt do justice in those progressions



Try something like:

C minor add 9
F minor add 9
Ab major add #11(no 5)
G major add #5

Don't know how easily the last chord chord can be done on guitar.

but the basic layout is :

i(9) - iv(9) - bVI(#11 no 5) - V(add flat 13)

You can also substitute the V chord with a VII+(augmented(B augmented in C)) chord. Augmented 4ths in minor are also a pretty easy way to sound really dark.

If you haven't already check out Opeth's song Closure. It has some pretty interesting progressions.
Last edited by NothingRocks at Dec 16, 2015,
#11
Quote by bryangourley8
I'm looking for some interesting chords that don't go along with the typical
I VI IV V or other common progressions. To go into specifics, I want to have an organ playing legato chords with drums and lyrics in a rock style, but to sound different than most. Kinda like fix you by cold play. Could I get some help?

Kinda like this?
http://www.guitaretab.com/c/coldplay/217480.html
All pretty normal major and minor chords there - although a couple have 7ths added (b7 on Am, maj7 on F).
They're not what I'd call "dark and heavy", mind. But then I guess that sort of thing is subjective.

As suggested, you probably just need to experiment with adding notes to your basic chords. Sus4s, sus2s, 6ths, 7ths, 9ths. All worth trying.

7ths are fairly standard - b7s are bluesy/jazzy, while maj7s have a sweeter, more melancholy effect on major chords. Here's a classic example of the maj7 effect (Fmaj7and Cmaj7):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8WzDO_hj8A

9ths add a kind of sweetness or sad yearning. A minor chord with an added 9th is probably the saddest chord there is - which is probably what Nigel Tufnel was trying to say .
Here's what may be the first use of an Emadd9 in rock: Jeff Beck (no, that's not Nigel Tufnel) is playing it at 0:36, and it's on the title phrase (appropriately enough), at 1:15:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9fmleT7mxs
(Other than that, the chords are all simple major and minor chords, and the mood is created mainly through excessive use of reverb, the pseudo Gregorian chant vocal, and the broken drum rhythm.)

In the Police's "Every Breath You Take" there's an add9 on every chord in the song (major and minor) which is partly what gives it its mood of obsessive yearning.
#12
Quote by bryangourley8
I would like more complicated chord progressions than the I IV V but in all the sense im looking for a dark and heavy sound and regular minor chords dnt do justice in those progressions


i-iii-i-iii-bvi-iii-bvi-iii

Also heavy and dark really aren't in the chord progression so much as they are in the overall sound, which is the sum of many parts including melody, rhythm, timbre, etc.

http://youtu.be/wLy8u9ICDxU

There is a lot more going on there than the chord progression.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Dec 17, 2015,
#13
Quote by theogonia777


Also heavy and dark really aren't in the chord progression so much as they are in the overall sound, which is the sum of many parts including melody, rhythm, timbre, etc.
Exactly.
#14
I just need to ask, why? Having unusual chord progressions doesn't make you a better musician or songwriter, in fact, the best songwriters often use common progressions to back excellent melodies. But, anyway, if you want a sound like Fix You, check out Fix You. If the chords I've just looked up are right, it's a I iii iv V progression in the verses, so if we take it that I, vi, IV and V are the sole ingredients of most common progressions, we see that we get that sound by using one less common chord in the key. It may be that you don't need all of these add15b5suspended9 chords, you might want to just change one chord out to get that intrigue. If you're playing a minor chord progression, you can change chord iii into a major chord, or if you're playing a major chord progression, use a minor chord that isn't chord iv, maybe ii, iii, brush past diminished vii if you want, but start small and simple first, then, if that's not enough, explore different chords.
#15
I love add15 chords.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#16
Quote by CelestialGuitar
I just need to ask, why? Having unusual chord progressions doesn't make you a better musician or songwriter, in fact, the best songwriters often use common progressions to back excellent melodies. But, anyway, if you want a sound like Fix You, check out Fix You. If the chords I've just looked up are right, it's a I iii iv V progression in the verses, so if we take it that I, vi, IV and V are the sole ingredients of most common progressions, we see that we get that sound by using one less common chord in the key. It may be that you don't need all of these add15b5suspended9 chords, you might want to just change one chord out to get that intrigue. If you're playing a minor chord progression, you can change chord iii into a major chord, or if you're playing a major chord progression, use a minor chord that isn't chord iv, maybe ii, iii, brush past diminished vii if you want, but start small and simple first, then, if that's not enough, explore different chords.

It's not that I'm trying to be a better muscician. Im just intersted in learning something different. Ive taken lessons on the basic chor progressions and everything but i want to learn some unusual stuff
#17
Quote by bryangourley8
It's not that I'm trying to be a better muscician. Im just intersted in learning something different. Ive taken lessons on the basic chor progressions and everything but i want to learn some unusual stuff


Gotta know what's usual before you know what's unusual. The best way to start working outside of convention is to learn a lot about what people already do. Just start learning whatever music catches your ear and you'll start get an appreciation for how interesting normal music can be, and where its boundaries are.
#18
Coldplay doesn't really use that strange chord progressions. Their stuff is pretty basic when it comes to chords, mostly diatonic to the key. But if you like the sound, it doesn't matter.

Yeah, I would do what was suggested above - just listen to music and figure out the chords in songs that you like. I would also suggest learning about keys and chord functions.
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#19
Quote by bryangourley8
I'm looking for some interesting chords that don't go along with the typical
I VI IV V or other common progressions. To go into specifics, I want to have an organ playing legato chords with drums and lyrics in a rock style, but to sound different than most. Kinda like fix you by cold play. Could I get some help?


Three sure fire quick tips to avoid diatonic cliches:

1) play a bar chord and then slide it up 3 frets
2) flat five - play a chord and then play a chord a flat five up
3) chromatics - play the chord or a diminished chord one fret up or down from the one that is supposed to sound right. Nirvana does this to great effect.