#1
Hello, it recently got clear to me that scales and intervals is what takes you out of the novice zone. Do you guys agree? And please tell me the most important scales, and if you got any tips please🤘🏻
#2
Major, natural minor, minor blues initially.

But suggest you master intervals first (as in their shapes) since every scale and chord are made from intervals. So, if you learn the scale formula (what intervals it has), you can use that along with interval shapes to help you memorise.

E.g. a "b7" interval occurs in both the minor blues scale, and in the natural minor scale.

You may find the following helpful ...
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/drastically_reduce_learning_time_with_intervals_part_2.html
Check out
#4
I don't think scales divide beginner from more skilled. You can be quite novice and know some scales. I would start with major scale. For me, what's important is that pattern on the guitar. What the intervals are, doesn't matter so much.
For example, the major scale, and the minor are the same collection of notes. It's the same pattern on the guitar. But the interval progression is different, because of where in the pattern the tonic is.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Dec 17, 2015,
#5
Okay i see where you are going but i mean intervalls is a must learn especially for soloing dont you think?
Pretty sure van halen, randy Rhodes and Jimmy Hendrix knew intervals
Last edited by Maxfalk at Dec 17, 2015,
#6
Scales and such are basic knowledge, yes. You'll do yourself a favor if you get the 12 major/minor scales down early on, since pretty everything else is viewed as an alteration of those. Pentatonics, too.

The basic rudiments that will help you understand 90% of music you hear every day:
-The major/minor scale
-The major/minor pentatonic scale
-Major and minor triads
-Dominant 7th chords

Get those in all 12 keys and you'll have at least the knowledge you need to play a huge amount of guitar music.

This is probably several months of material, if you do a little every time you practice. I'd suggest taking a big bite of a concept to start, then backing down to "Maintenance" playing after you've memorized the stuff. ie, spend a lot of time on major scales for a few days, then after you memorize them, just play through them a few times a week or so.
Last edited by cdgraves at Dec 17, 2015,
#7
Quote by Maxfalk
Okay i see where you are going but i mean intervalls is a must learn especially for soloing dont you think?
Pretty sure van halen, randy Rhodes and Jimmy Hendrix knew intervals


I dont. I'm always learning and improving, but im satisfied with my soloing as it is.

I just know the patterns, and my brain does the rest. It knows what note will sound what way, and thats all I need.

I could solo for you in any key. Basically any pop song, the first time I hear it, within a few bars, no matter what key or mode it is in.

But I cant say what the intervals are off thw top of my head, for any scale other than major, for a few reasons, one of which, is that it is obvious from looking at a piano. I could figure any one out by imagining a piano, and going through it as a relative of C major. That wouldnt be tough, but its not something I ever think about, or use in any way. But that pattern is important to me.

I dont see any reason to believe any of the artists you mentioned would be any different. They might be, idk. Maybe some are and some arent, everyone is different.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Dec 17, 2015,
#8
Quote by Maxfalk
Okay i see where you are going but i mean intervalls is a must learn especially for soloing dont you think?
Pretty sure van halen, randy Rhodes and Jimmy Hendrix knew intervals


Intervals, and knowing how they sound, is everything for lead guitar. Once you get an ear for major and minor thirds, 7ths , etc. you can really solo well over progressions because you'll understand how given notes will sound in relation to a given chord.

For improvising it's an absolute necessity.
#9
Quote by fingrpikingood
I dont. I'm always learning and improving, but im satisfied with my soloing as it is.

I just know the patterns, and my brain does the rest. It knows what note will sound what way, and thats all I need.

I could solo for you in any key. Basically any pop song, the first time I hear it, within a few bars, no matter what key or mode it is in.

But I cant say what the intervals are off thw top of my head, for any scale other than major, for a few reasons, one of which, is that it is obvious from looking at a piano. I could figure any one out by imagining a piano, and going through it as a relative of C major. That wouldnt be tough, but its not something I ever think about, or use in any way. But that pattern is important to me.

I dont see any reason to believe any of the artists you mentioned would be any different. They might be, idk. Maybe some are and some arent, everyone is different.


You actually appear to know your intervals quite well, even if you don't know the names. The names are easy to learn because there aren't many.

Even great "uneducated" guitarist know their intervals, they just don't use the common terms for them.
#10
Quote by reverb66
You actually appear to know your intervals quite well, even if you don't know the names. The names are easy to learn because there aren't many.

Even great "uneducated" guitarist know their intervals, they just don't use the common terms for them.


I know the names, I could name you a number of intervals for chord nomenclature, and I know intuitively how to get from A-B by ear, but the farther away it is, the more difficult it is.

I never did any interval training, nor can I recite to you the intervals of a minor key, or any other mode other than major. I could work it out easily enough, but it's not something I studied and know.

We could argue about how important intervals themselves are, forever. I mean, they are worth being named, we obviously use them all the time, necessarily. But the question is, what to study, and spend time on. For me, intervals aren't really one of those things.

People are different and others might find the invaluable, and appear to. But for me, it's not worth spending time studying and memorizing in its own right, except for chord nomenclature, which really only needs you to know the major key, and that pattern is very important to me. The pattern of notes without a tonic, I mean. Not the interval relationships to the tonic for whatever key or mode. I don't worry about that.