#1
Hey Guys,

I am thinking of selling my current amp and moving to a used HD500X(or similar) for practicing.

I only play alone at home. No gigs or band practice.

I was considering buying a small tube amp and building a pedal board but going with a modeler is definitely cheaper overall for my purposes.

I would plan on using headphones for quiet practice and maybe getting studio monitors for playing out loud.

Will I get a real amp "feel" playing through studio monitors? Or is it going to seem strange and disconnected? Are modeling floorboards good enough sound/feel wise to satisfy me? How does the HD500x compare sound wise to something like a Vox VT+ series amp?

Looking for opinions. Thanks!
#2
The hd 500 is only good for wedging the door open whilst you bring some useful gear in the room. Way too complicated and you will probably be too old to play guitar before you work out how to use it.

Get the studio monitors and an interface and use amp sims for playing at home. You can then also record yourself and compare your progress without extra expense.
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#3
Quote by crackerjack123
The hd 500 is only good for wedging the door open whilst you bring some useful gear in the room. Way too complicated and you will probably be too old to play guitar before you work out how to use it.

Get the studio monitors and an interface and use amp sims for playing at home. You can then also record yourself and compare your progress without extra expense.


speak for yourself. it is NOT that complicated.

IIRC the POD can be a interface too, which could be very handy.

_________

as far as amp sims with studio monitors go, i have limited experience with them, but i have heard decent results.

_________

also, do NOT cheap out on monitors or headphones, they make a big difference.

_________

also the cost may not be far off with the interface and amp sims, etc. you have to do what feels right for you.
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#4
Quote by crackerjack123
The hd 500 is only good for wedging the door open whilst you bring some useful gear in the room. Way too complicated and you will probably be too old to play guitar before you work out how to use it.

Get the studio monitors and an interface and use amp sims for playing at home. You can then also record yourself and compare your progress without extra expense.


I'm sure that's true for some people, but for the rest of us who can count to 10 (without using our fingers), tie our own shoes and seldom pee our pants, the HD500 isn't particularly burdensome.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
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#5
There's definately a learning curve with the HD500X, but it's not something that is beyond someone who's motivated to learn it. Once you grasp the concept that modeling is exactly that...modeling a virtual guitar rig, then it all becomes quite apparent. Even myself at the ripe old age of 63 mastered the concepts in a couple of hours.

A couple of things to bear in mind:

Using it with headsets or a studio monitor or a PA loudspeaker is actually the optimal way to use these things in my opinion. However you want to spend a fair amount of money to get decent headphones or speakers so you can enjoy all the benefits of the variety of sounds.

Make sure if you're using powered speakers you set up the POD correctly setting the 1/4" out switch to direct rather than amp. Also make sure you have Studio/Direct selected in the global output settings.

Although you can download patches through Line6 CustomTone and other sources, bear in mind that those tones may be flavored by the type of guitar and configuration the author of the tone used. I think it's personally FAR more beneficial to learn to build your own tones. You'll learn a lot more about both the amps and the effects that way.

Powered speakers or monitors are typically considered FRFR (Flat Response Full Range) speakers which are quite different than typical guitar amps which have a very limited frequency response. Depending on the speaker you get you may need to use the Global EQ to dial down the very high end frequencies and low end frequencies to get the response more similar to a standard guitar cabinet. I use a Yamaha DXR12 and I have my Low Cut set at 80 HZ and my High Cut set at 7.3 KHZ. There's really nothing of importance produced by guitar below and above that range anyway. Make sure the Globe EQ is set to 'ON".

There's a lot to learn on the POD, but you don't need to know it all to get it to perform pretty well for you. You'll learn different tricks and ways to use things as you go along, but the flexibility of the unit is almost endless.

As far as sound comparisons to a Vox, in spite of what people that don't use modeling say, I doubt seriously you'll be able to distinguish between a real Vox and the modeled Voxes in the POD. There is a vintage pack offered for sale from Line 6 that includes an additional Vox model that I find to be very accurate in reproducing british crunch tones similar to the Rolling Stones and The Who as well as various punk bands. It comes with both an AC-15 and an AC-30 with top boost.

As far as feel, the only difference I noticed is because of the clarity and articulation of my powered speakers and the precision of the modeling I had to get rid of some sloppy habits I had developed over time using a regular amp. Personally I think that was a good thing.

My personal opinion is that to get the most out of the POD you need to approach it more like a recording engineer would approach capturing a guitar in a studio rather than the way a live stage musician might approach things. When you learn to tweak your sounds using things like compressors and parametric EQ's you can really achieve some stunning live sounds well beyond what you could do with a simple guitar amp and pedals.
Last edited by dunedindragon at Dec 18, 2015,