#1
Hello.

Today I want to ask you what do you think abut my new guitar. I was thinking about how to make really comfortable not heavy but with deep sound guitar. I don’t like make some copy of existing models because everybody can find them in every music shop. First I wanted to find a good shape which will be completely different than others and here is the question. Did you ever saw anything similar to my new model? It is important because I don't know every popular guitar in this planet but maybe some of you saw something similar to mine. The news that we decided to use is curved body to make your right hand in more comfortable position. For me it works quite well but me, as a maker of this guitar can be not objective We also decided to add possibility for install pickups from the back of body. I don't know about others but I like to experiment a lot with electronics and I like to check every pickups what I find. Installing pickups from the back of body gives me opportunity to change it without taking of the strings. I am able to change pickup in 10 minutes without any special tools. Guitar is very light and I was afraid that it will not sound good but everything is ok (for me). I want to know your opinion about design and what do you think abut those innovations. Is this necessary or not?

www.bouwerguitars.com



#3
I love the fretboard, but the color and shape of the guitar are awful lol. I take aesthetics over playability/comfort always
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#4
From a ergonomics perspective:
The protruding upper horn will help balance it without adding unnecessary weight to the body and is a good idea as long as it does not interfere with your playing. The simplicity of the controls is good but possibly limiting (unless there is a tone and volume control in switchable pots somehow). The rounded edges look comfortable (Strat-like). The headstock might benefit from narrower placement of tuners to lessen lateral binding on the string nut.

The back-loaded pups keep the front very clean and futuristic, and enables wiring and mod work to be done without disassembling the whole thing.

If the body is light, then perhaps it is not made of wood but rather a lightweight, stiff composite. I do not know how it impacts sustain (and although not all agree, wood has varying stiffness as a function of frequency and also transmits a little to the pickups and therefore *does* subtly influence the tone - especially on the attack). Body material that is light and very stiff might not have a warm tone compared to wood.

Aesthetically it is a little odd, and the colour is not for everyone, but if it plays well and sounds good then it is a refreshing departure from the Les Paul and Super Strat trends.

I would personally love to try one of those to see for myself.
#5
Are *you* designing this new guitar, or are you looking at buying it for yourself?
Last edited by Blademaster2 at Dec 18, 2015,
#6
pros:
-clean and tight work.
-rear mount pu's and pots.

cons:
-bulbous, overhanging "horn". it's really big for a guitar.
-possibly difficult to sit with.
-bridge elevator wheels buried in the body?
-radical slope of the top may make adding a trem difficult.

make it black and add a floyd
Last edited by ad_works at Dec 18, 2015,
#7
Aesthetics are a personal thing; there are popular designs I like a lot less. I'll just say I think that a non-spikey headstock, maybe something like a Talman, would have gone better.

I think that the rear mounting is a very good idea, I've been considering doing something similar as a test rig.
#8
Looks like a PS10 shape wise,but i agree with others that the thing looks like a tank (too big) but the shape is pretty cool.
#9
Interchangeable pickups isn't very new (Dan Armstrong had pickups that interchanged on his original plexiglass guitar, and several companies have tried pickups mounted from the back of the guitar, including Gibson). Nothing else on it that hasn't been done.
#10
I'm not a fan of that long, rounded arm of the body, but other than that it looks like a pretty neat guitar.
#11
Here's another question that's gone un-asked.

Why bother changing pickups "in ten minutes without loosening the strings?"

When Dan Armstrong built his clear plastic guitar, he offered six different pickups. The *idea* was that you could change the pickup to suit the music you were playing. What they found, however, was that even among those who bought all six pickups (a considerable expenditure) with the guitar, almost no one changed the pickups again after the first 30 days. In short, it was the answer to a question pretty much no one was asking.

There are and have been guitars out there that have allowed pickup changes even more quickly than swapping from the rear.
Here's one:



None, so far, have been particularly successful.
#12
Yeah, changing pickups that fast is kinda useless. If you are that into different sounds, you probably already own a guitar with a different set anyway, and its easier to swap those than any sort of fast pickup change.
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#13
Not to mention they make plenty of external devices that can alter the perceived sound created by the pickups....you can make single coils sound like humbuckers and vice versa. Swapping pickups quickly would only be intuitive for testing purposes so many sets could be tried quickly in the same guitar...for that purpose it's cool otherwise its not at all practical.
#14
I had a Ampeg Dan Armstong in the 70's. Those pickups could be changed in a few seconds. You just pulled out the pickup and pushed another under the strings onto two large banana plugs. As well as it seemed to work not to many players used it and Ampeg didn't continue too support it (other than Keith Richards). By the time I bought mine used in 1975 the pickups were almost impossible to find so I was stuck with two of them and didn't like either. The neck and action was nice as I remember.

As for the above guitar, I personally don't like the shape or the color. That big horn is pretty ugly to me. The workmanship looks nice.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Dec 20, 2015,
#15
The guitar body - looks like the PRS neck mated with a Fender that someone put through the "skew" setting in Photoshop. Can't say I am a fan of the bod, but I am a fan of the neck or PRS

The body - there is a new guitar on the market that uses similar shape but flipped, the big horn is on the bottom.

I would want to have some wood underneath my pickups for acoustic reasons, hate to have two hollow places over the middle exactly where the main string resonances "ring".
#16
Quote by diabolical
The guitar body - looks like the PRS neck mated with a Fender that someone put through the "skew" setting in Photoshop. Can't say I am a fan of the bod, but I am a fan of the neck or PRS

The body - there is a new guitar on the market that uses similar shape but flipped, the big horn is on the bottom.

I would want to have some wood underneath my pickups for acoustic reasons, hate to have two hollow places over the middle exactly where the main string resonances "ring".



You must really dislike stratocasters?
#17
Quote by diabolical

I would want to have some wood underneath my pickups for acoustic reasons, hate to have two hollow places over the middle exactly where the main string resonances "ring".


Actually, that's NOT where the "main string resonances "ring."
Otherwise, guitars like this wouldn't work:

#18
Just a FWIW. The Ovation "Breadwinner" & "Deacon" series, are considered by many to be the most ergonomic guitars of all time...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 24, 2015,
#19
Quote by Captaincranky
Just a FWIW. The Ovation "Breadwinner" & "Deacon" series, are considered by many to be the most ergonomic guitars of all time...


Yup. Just depends on your planet.
#20
Quote by dspellman
Yup. Just depends on your planet.
Did you ever play one, or are you just an amateur astronomer?

Here's a comment from Jon Way's review of the Deacon. The guitar sounds like shit, but apparently it's really comfy. (*)

I have a Deacon that is a little older than this one. The active electronics were shot, so I replaced the neck pickup with a mini-humbucker and the bridge pickup with a mini-filtertron. My bridge has the nylon saddles. He's so right about the comfort factor. It's probably the most comfortable guitar I've ever played; the body is fabulous and the action is a lot like my Country Gentleman--perfect. Deacons are built well, and mine sounds wonderful.


(*) That might be Jon Way's fault. Although, his review of an Eastwood "Breadwinner", made that guitar sound great..
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 25, 2015,