#1
So what I most often see with mic'd guitar cabs is figure 1. But isn't that an inefficient way to drive the mic? Wouldn't figure 2 allow more moved air from the cone to directly hit the mic?

#2
Are you drawing the cone or the visualization of sound projection? Because it's fairly well known among anyone who's done this for any length of time that pointing the mic at the cone is not always the best approach. I find more often than not that the mid-edge of the cone is far better. My 57 lives just within the edge of the cone on my Princeton.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
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#4
I don't see much difference in your drawings Will.

The most efficient way of doing things would be not to put a mic in front of a speaker anyway - the reason why it's done is because of how it sounds, so decide basing yourself on what sounds best instead of what's more efficient.
Name's Luca.

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#5
Quote by Spambot_2
I don't see much difference in your drawings Will.

The most efficient way of doing things would be not to put a mic in front of a speaker anyway - the reason why it's done is because of how it sounds, so decide basing yourself on what sounds best instead of what's more efficient.

Are you saying it's more efficient to use amp sims? Because that's totally subjective. For me, it's easier to use a mic because in my home studio that mic is on a stand in front of the amp with a cable connected to my interface, and this is rarely ever undone. I got it to sound good once, and then left it in place. Got a gig? Amp comes off of its stand and goes to the gig, then gets dropped right back in position. My DAW has a default session that opens, all I do is click 'record enable' and I have my perfect guitar tone. I'd say that's pretty efficient.

Anyway, OP, here's an image of what I'm talking about. I set my mic like the one on the right, I find it's much more balanced. I guess it depends on the mic and amp, though, this won't work for everyone (but I see it FAR more often than a center mic).
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#6
^I think Spambot (Luca?) was suggesting that the most efficient way of hearing a guitar speaker is just by hearing it, not micing it. As that would give the most realistic, and the most accurate sound as it is the sound. Which is fine unless your are competing with a PA and you need the sound to go through the house speakers only. So really I am talking about just micing efficiency.

As far as my original question, I think some of it has to do with how sound moves out of a speaker anyway and that I am not too sure of. So this might help clarify things.



Does sound move more like the first or second example? I was basing my first question as if it moved as the second example shows but I am second-guessing that now. I was thinking that since the cone is slanted that it might push sound out at that same angle but looking back on it I do not think that is correct.
Last edited by Will Lane at Dec 19, 2015,
#7
Yeah my name's Luca

I meant the most efficient way as the way that wastes less power.

Air (sound) is moved by a speaker more similarly to the first example, but it's still off.
This will give you an idea -
http://www.integracoustics.com/MUG/MUG/articles/sources/v_post.gif

Tho again, if you go for the way that transmits more air to the mic the most efficient way is putting it about a cm from the grille, facing the centre.
That'll give you a pretty harsh sound because guitar speakers aren't really good speakers from the tech point of view, so while it's the most efficient way (even tho still not really efficient) you might wanna go for a less efficient way and turn up the gain after the mic to raise the volume coming out of the PA system.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#8
How sound moves out of a speaker is less important than how different mic locations affect tonal balance and how a mic picks up sound. Three popular methods are often used:

1. On center, on axis. A common method that tends to result in bright, punchy, in-your-face, tonal balance.
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-GaxUhaDoDxM/UM5zfoMTP6I/AAAAAAAAAco/n8vqcv02Rhs/s1600/Mic+Position.jpg

2. Off center, on axis. This tends to sound more balanced and similar to hearing the speaker a few feet away.

http://thetoneking.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/Copy-of-PC310029.JPG

3. Off center, off axis. (the Les Paul method). This tends to result in the smoothest overall response as sound from the speaker is hitting the mic from a slight side angle instead of head-on. Since a cardioid mic has a pickup pattern that looks like this.
https://www.google.com/search?q=cardioid+pickup+pattern+microphone&espv=2&biw=1147&bih=572&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjK7NyBo-vJAhUDVj4KHbKtBNAQsAQIIw

Pointing the mic directly at the speaker is simply not necessary. We are more interested in tonal balance and rejecting sound behind the mic. When in doubt, trust your ears.
http://thechurchcollective.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/off-axis.jpg
https://i.ytimg.com/vi/g_ecfpeS7LM/maxresdefault.jpg

This demonstrates the differences pretty well:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RyDnoHSFsnc
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Dec 20, 2015,
#9
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/aug07/articles/guitaramprecording.htm

http://www.recordingmag.com/resources/resourceDetail/133.html

These should take care of any questions about recording guitar. I prefer to use real mic in front of real amp for my serious projects. Sometimes a sim might just do it, usually on lead guitar parts.