Page 1 of 2
#1
I've been posting band related things on craigslist and have only gotten a few replies back. This has been a hit to my confidence as a player. I don't know if I'm getting little replies because I sound like shit or it's because the site is getting little traffic. Either way, I need harsh criticism and there's no better place for that than the internet.

I uploaded this with my phone on top of my amp head, so the quality isn't the best, but it still worked.

https://soundcloud.com/need2killsometime
Last edited by J23L at Dec 19, 2015,
#2
You need to work on a couple of things. Timing (all over the place), swapping chords (when doing arps), picking (getting an even tone when picking). Start slow, and use a metronome. You notes also need a sense of confidence. Play slowly, evenly, and deliberately.
Last edited by GoldenGuitar at Dec 19, 2015,
#3
Quote by GoldenGuitar
You need to work on a couple of things. Timing (all over the place), swapping chords (when doing arps), picking (getting an even tone when picking). Start slow, and use a metronome. You notes also need a sense of confidence. Play slowly, evenly, and deliberately.

Yea, I have a bad habit of playing fast (which throws off my timing) . When i was younger I used to constantly irritate my guitar teacher with this. Also, when it comes to getting an even tone when picking individual notes, don't i need a compressor pedal for that? I don't have a compressor at the moment so that is why the individual notes do not sound even. Thanks for the reply
#4
The tone issue is a matter of technique. A compressor will only even out the dynamics of what you play.


Now my question to you is, do you think you suck?
#5
Quote by GoldenGuitar
Now my question to you is, do you think you suck?


I know im far from the best, but i certainly do not think that i suck. The problem with this, however, is that people who do actually suck do not think that they suck. As far as i know i could be garbage and nobody is telling me. I think that I need the opinions of others to validate my playing.
#7
Quote by GoldenGuitar
Well then, what do you hear when you listen back to the recording you posted?

I hear decent playing, but with a lack of confidence. When i play I'm rarely 100% confident (unless what I'm playing is extremely easy). I think that is partly the reason why I have a habit of playing fast. If i play slow I feel like i will fuck up. Playing fast kind of gives me a boost in confidence.
#8
The rhythm is sloppy. I think that's the biggest issue. There is that "beginner sound" to your playing and I think it's mostly because of the rhythm.

You shouldn't get a compressor if your tone is not even when picking. You should correct your technique. Don't use pedals to mask your mistakes. That's not what they are for.


Do you use a metronome? Do you use backing tracks/play along with album versions? That should fix the rhythm issue.


Just because you don't get replies doesn't necessarily mean you suck. Maybe the stuff you post just doesn't interest that many people. I don't think your playing is great, but do you suck? I don't know. Do you think you sound good? Do you think you suck?
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
Quote by J23L
I hear decent playing, but with a lack of confidence. When i play I'm rarely 100% confident (unless what I'm playing is extremely easy). I think that is partly the reason why I have a habit of playing fast. If i play slow I feel like i will fuck up. Playing fast kind of gives me a boost in confidence.

There's your problem. You lack the sensitivity to gauge whether you sound good or not. This just takes time to develop. Keep this recording and come back to it in 3 or 4 years.
#10
Quote by MaggaraMarine
The rhythm is sloppy. I think that's the biggest issue. There is that "beginner sound" to your playing and I think it's mostly because of the rhythm.

You shouldn't get a compressor if your tone is not even when picking. You should correct your technique. Don't use pedals to mask your mistakes. That's not what they are for.


Do you use a metronome? Do you use backing tracks/play along with album versions? That should fix the rhythm issue.


Just because you don't get replies doesn't necessarily mean you suck. Maybe the stuff you post just doesn't interest that many people. I don't think your playing is great, but do you suck? I don't know. Do you think you sound good? Do you think you suck?

Yes, I play along to backing tracks, but when i recorded these samples i wasn't playing along to anything. It probably would have sounded better if i played along to the songs or used a metronome. I know im not great, but i never knew to what extent how good or bad i am. I think that these recordings were rushed and i didn't take the time to properly time the rhythm. I will keep this in mind.
I also never realized the unevenness in my picking. I will try to fix this. I honestly don't think I suck, but i think other's opinions are just as, if not more valuable than my own.It's useful to hear what others have to say about you.
#11
I agree with the above posts. All of those recordings sound rushed, as if you're not comfortably able to play the parts at the tempo. The only way to fix that is to slow things down and practice to a metronome until there are no mistakes. Once you're nailing it with a metronome, your confidence should increase.

As for getting no replies to band adverts, that's a fact of life. Finding other musicians with same preferences is hard. It's easy to find guitarists, vox, bass and drums are less abundant. If you post what you put on Craigslist here, we might be able to advise on what might be putting people off.

I don't think you suck, I've heard much worse and played much worse when starting out. But, at the same time, you need to put in a lot of work to play the songs you recorded to a decent standard. Being able to nail the songs 6 out of 10 times when by yourself in your bedroom is no good if you want to play in front of an audience. In a live/band setting, people will appreciate 10 well played, well placed, rhythmically accurate notes/chords over 1000 sloppy, dead, out of time notes/chords and will not rate you highly if you fumble your way through a set due to nerves/low confidence. They will just think you suck and you'll probably empty the room. Only your mom/friends will have sympathy for nerves. If your playing can't handle the pressure and your ego can't handle negative feedback, stay off the stage.

Lastly, I don't mean to sound harsh in the previous paragraph, I'm just stating what I've seen/heard/felt in my own experience. Wanting to play Slash songs is a great aim but for your band, you may want to aim to play something less complicated to start with to build your confidence. There's nothing worse than bombing on stage.
Guitars:
EVH Wolfgang Special LH
Gibson Les Paul Studio 2013
Ibanez EW20LASE-NT LH

Effects:
BOSS GT-100

Amps:
Fender Hot Rod DeVille 410
Laney IRT Studio + 112 cab
#12
It's kind of hard to give you feedback given the recording technique and the tone you're getting out of your equipment. I can get past that but probably most people can't and that may be why you don't get much feedback on your recordings. However, tone and technique are related in many ways and I'll deal with that later.

First, I don't think you suck, and you shouldn't either. You've developed some good foundation skills you can build on. The challenge is to keep taking that next step toward improvement. If you're a guitar player that's ALWAYS going to be the case. We never stop learning and we never stop improving.

I'd agree with other comments about developing better precision in your timing, but it also sounds to me that some of this may be related to the tension you have in your picking hand. I also sense some tension in your fretting hand as well (hearing some fret buzz on some notes) and this could be related to just knowing you're recording. But I would encourage you to work on relaxing both hands and arms while playing. I get the sense your picking too hard which may be caused by any number of things. Holding the pick too tight or at a flat angle, using your fingers more than your wrist for picking, too much tension in your forearm, etc.

Another area to look at is your palm muting technique. It sounds to me that some of your arpeggio picking may be too far up on the strings and shouuld be closer to the bridge and combined with a bit of palm muting to get the strings better articulation. Not being familiar with the cover tunes that's hard to say. I don't know if the originals were meant to allow the strings to sing out or not, but I didn't notice much in the way a palm muting on any of the tracks which makes me wonder if you've developed much technique in that area.

Back to the tone, I'm hearing a lot of unamplified/raw picking and strumming in your recordings, more than what you would expect in an amplified guitar. It could be how you recorded it, but generally the tone and amplification from the amp would cover that over. I realize you weren't recording necessarily at stage volume, but I also heard you dial up the guitar volume when you went from the clean picking to the heavy strumming. What most people do in this situation is to keep the amp on a clean, non-overdiven level with just enough drive to give the clean notes some definition and body, then use an overdrive pedal to add the drive/distortion you need for the heavy passages. Bear in mind that when you lower the volume on the guitar, you also lower tonal response of the pickups and what people percieve in the tone due to an anomole called the Fletcher-Munson curve. You may be better off keeping your volume up on a clean amp setting then kicking in an overdrive. This may also help with some of the tension I sense in your picking because you are unconsciously trying to compensate for the lack of volume/body in the clean segments by picking harder.

Anyway, those are my first impressions. Again, not as criticism, but just areas you can look at toward improvement.
#13
Quote by G-Dog_666
I agree with the above posts. All of those recordings sound rushed, as if you're not comfortably able to play the parts at the tempo. The only way to fix that is to slow things down and practice to a metronome until there are no mistakes. Once you're nailing it with a metronome, your confidence should increase.

As for getting no replies to band adverts, that's a fact of life. Finding other musicians with same preferences is hard. It's easy to find guitarists, vox, bass and drums are less abundant. If you post what you put on Craigslist here, we might be able to advise on what might be putting people off.

I don't think you suck, I've heard much worse and played much worse when starting out. But, at the same time, you need to put in a lot of work to play the songs you recorded to a decent standard. Being able to nail the songs 6 out of 10 times when by yourself in your bedroom is no good if you want to play in front of an audience. In a live/band setting, people will appreciate 10 well played, well placed, rhythmically accurate notes/chords over 1000 sloppy, dead, out of time notes/chords and will not rate you highly if you fumble your way through a set due to nerves/low confidence. They will just think you suck and you'll probably empty the room. Only your mom/friends will have sympathy for nerves. If your playing can't handle the pressure and your ego can't handle negative feedback, stay off the stage.

Lastly, I don't mean to sound harsh in the previous paragraph, I'm just stating what I've seen/heard/felt in my own experience. Wanting to play Slash songs is a great aim but for your band, you may want to aim to play something less complicated to start with to build your confidence. There's nothing worse than bombing on stage.

I have played these songs with a metronome and i have nailed them with good timing. I just didn't use a metronome on these recordings. Like i said, I guess I got cocky and thought i could do it without a metronome.
I honestly think my biggest problem is confidence. I think the only way i can fix this is if i get a band and play with people. Do you think this is a good idea? I don't see any other way i can build my confidence unless i play with people
#15
I think you need to learn to analyze your own playing. That's how your practicing becomes a lot more efficient. Listen to your playing. Are you satisfied with the sound? Does it sound accurate?

If you are making mistakes, slow it down. You can't really correct your mistakes by speeding up. Also, if you slow it down, it may be easier to spot your mistakes.


But yeah, playing with other people is always a good idea.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#16
Aside of the timing issues, it doesn't sound like you mean it with your playing ... it sounds mechanical, rigid.

It's clear from sample 3 that you are on the way as a player, and I suspect you were very tense when you made all these examples.

So, maybe you do have a confidence problem ... thing is this ... noone is going to kill you for playing inaccurately, or incorrectly ... they may not respond ... worse case you get an insult or two. It doesn't matter, it really doesn't. That is your inspiration to improve.

Enjoy yourself, and fix the problems (technique), and work on puttiing more feel into the music ... part of that is a technique thing (but timing is critical) ... dressing up notes, damping, vibrato (especially vibrato).

As others say, slow down so you can catch your problems (they get exaggerated when slow) ... face them head on ... you'll never get to be great player if you don't go through this (if that's what you want).

Best way to improve your confidence is to play with others, and in front of others (and be well rehearsed).
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Dec 19, 2015,
#17
Quote by J23L
I have played these songs with a metronome and i have nailed them with good timing. I just didn't use a metronome on these recordings. Like i said, I guess I got cocky and thought i could do it without a metronome.
I honestly think my biggest problem is confidence. I think the only way i can fix this is if i get a band and play with people. Do you think this is a good idea? I don't see any other way i can build my confidence unless i play with people


With the greatest respect, I'd need to hear a recording with a metronome and these songs nailed before we rule out more practice being needed. Your playing won't suddenly get better or worse if the metronome is turned off. Even if red light syndrome did kick in, I'd expect the playing to sound more fluid if you'd got it nailed.

Playing with other musicians in a band is great experience and fun most of the time. However, if you're looking for a confidence/ego boost, you're not going to find what you're after. Donning and axe, pulling a few shapes and fumbling some Slash songs on stage won't get ladies flinging their bras and panties in your direction and get all the dudes throwing up the devil horns and commenting on your fretboard mastery. Players who get that already had the confidence and chops before going on stage.

I'm not trying to bring you down. I've been in your situation too and do not think I'm some sort of guitar wizard. I just don't see how moving to a band/live situation will help your confidence if it's already low. You should be going on stage feeling prepared, able to have a good time and be confident you'll make it to the end with minimal mistakes (hopefully no mistakes). Knowing you're not going to mess up is what brings confidence because you feel relaxed and at ease. Your lack of confidence makes me think you need to practice more. Amateurs practice until the get it right. Pros practice until they can't get it wrong. Most people do the former. Aim to do the latter. I promise your confidence will rise if you do that.
Guitars:
EVH Wolfgang Special LH
Gibson Les Paul Studio 2013
Ibanez EW20LASE-NT LH

Effects:
BOSS GT-100

Amps:
Fender Hot Rod DeVille 410
Laney IRT Studio + 112 cab
#18
Quote by GoldenGuitar
Post a recording of you nailing it with a metronome. It'll help us do a diagnosis.

I did one of the recordings over. I played along with the song this time. I couldn't use the same loud dirty tone as the original because it's 5 a.m. and my family is sleeping.

Compare this one to sample 4

https://soundcloud.com/need2killsometime/youre-a-lie-redo
#19
Quote by G-Dog_666
Amateurs practice until the get it right. Pros practice until they can't get it wrong. Most people do the former. Aim to do the latter. I promise your confidence will rise if you do that.

I appreciate your honesty. I will keep this in mind.
#21
Yeah, you need to practice slower. You don't need to practice all parts at slower tempo - focus on the parts you are having problems with. Practice until you can play it so that it feels easy, so that you don't feel like you are struggling. And it sounds like you are struggling.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#22
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Yeah, you need to practice slower. You don't need to practice all parts at slower tempo - focus on the parts you are having problems with. Practice until you can play it so that it feels easy, so that you don't feel like you are struggling. And it sounds like you are struggling.

Maybe the problem is that i play solely on Rocksmith for practice. I have a 98% accuracy on this song in the game .
#23
Quote by J23L
Maybe the problem is that i play solely on Rocksmith for practice. I have a 98% accuracy on this song in the game .

Yes... Don't trust what a game tells you. Trust your ears.

That's the problem with this kind of games. The idea is good and works for the "Guitar Hero generation". But it can't really replace a good teacher, or actually anybody with an ear. It can make you practice but it can't really tell you what you are doing wrong, other than you are not getting the notes 100% right. Also, I think it focuses too much on getting the notes right. There's more to music than getting the notes 100% right.


So use Rocksmith for having fun. But don't use it as the only way of practicing. It doesn't really teach you to use your ears.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Dec 19, 2015,
#24
Quote by J23L
I appreciate your honesty. I will keep this in mind.


I think all you need to do is slow things down until it feels more natural. Most good guitarists don't feel any strain when playing, that's why they make it look effortless. But they've just put in the hours practicing to get that good, build up finger strength and muscle memory. All the best fast players are also amazing slow players. Accuracy is more important than speed. Speed comes from accuracy. I've used Rocksmith once and it made no sense to me and hurt my head but if it's got you this far then keep at it. If it allows you to slow songs down, I'd say half time everything, so 120bpm = 60bpm and re-learn the songs. Once you nail them at half speed, go up by a few bpm e.g. 63bpm and repeat the process. You'll find you hit a speed barrier somewhere along the way. It's different with each person but let's say it'll be 80bpm. At 80bpm you constantly mess up. You then need to go back down to the last nailed bpm e.g. 78bpm and practice some more. It's better to only go up 1bpm at a time but this can be frustratingly slow going. But I'd advise no jumps more than 3bpm. Even 1bpm is a hell of a jump once you near the limit of your playing ability.

Also, I think it's been said before but it's worth reiterating; break up the songs into parts and practice them separately. e.g. Intro/Verse/Chorus. But then break them down further still if needed. In your last recording, you sounded better with chord changes but the single note parts had lots of dead notes. I'd imagine it's because you're not fretting them hard enough. That's either a finger strength issue or, most likely, you were rushing the part, so failed to fret the notes at speed. Using the tips above, you should be able to work out what speed you can manage without failure, and then work on improving from there.

Unfortunately, there's no quick and easy fix. You'll be battling with this sort of frustration throughout your guitar playing life. As you improve, you set your sights on bigger goals. I still feel frustration to this day and I've been playing for 18 years. All you can do is keep at it. Frustration is the enemy. Don't let it beat you.
Guitars:
EVH Wolfgang Special LH
Gibson Les Paul Studio 2013
Ibanez EW20LASE-NT LH

Effects:
BOSS GT-100

Amps:
Fender Hot Rod DeVille 410
Laney IRT Studio + 112 cab
#27
Generally if someone thinks they play better or make less mistakes when playing faster they're actually still making mistakes and sounding sloppy, but they're playing so fast and putting so much thought into hitting the notes that they can't hear the mistakes. Speed is a side effect of accuracy.

I only played rocksmith once at a friend's house for a few minutes and wasn't impressed. Sure it can teach you which notes to play, but it can't help with technique or timing, which I think are much more important, and honestly you should be able to use your own ears to tell when you've messed up instead of relying on software. When practicing you should play slowly enough that you can focus on getting everything right and staying relaxed. When you're performing, even if it's just for one person, it's more important to never lose timing since that's way more important than hitting a bad note. If you miss a note or don't mute something correctly or don't let something ring out all the way then yea that sucks, but it's not as big of a deal as it would be if you just skip a note in favor of keeping the groove going. Most people won't notice as long as the rhythm stays strong, and even if they do they won't care too much, whereas messing up the rhythm is extremely noticeable and will throw everyone off. I think it's important to also spend some time practicing with a song or metronome and striving to keep it going even when you mess up. I wouldn't say you should be spending all your time practicing like that, just a enough to know that you can do it so that your playing is strong even when you make a mistake.
#28
Quote by The4thHorsemen
Generally if someone thinks they play better or make less mistakes when playing faster they're actually still making mistakes and sounding sloppy, but they're playing so fast and putting so much thought into hitting the notes that they can't hear the mistakes. Speed is a side effect of accuracy.

I only played rocksmith once at a friend's house for a few minutes and wasn't impressed. Sure it can teach you which notes to play, but it can't help with technique or timing, which I think are much more important, and honestly you should be able to use your own ears to tell when you've messed up instead of relying on software. When practicing you should play slowly enough that you can focus on getting everything right and staying relaxed. When you're performing, even if it's just for one person, it's more important to never lose timing since that's way more important than hitting a bad note. If you miss a note or don't mute something correctly or don't let something ring out all the way then yea that sucks, but it's not as big of a deal as it would be if you just skip a note in favor of keeping the groove going. Most people won't notice as long as the rhythm stays strong, and even if they do they won't care too much, whereas messing up the rhythm is extremely noticeable and will throw everyone off. I think it's important to also spend some time practicing with a song or metronome and striving to keep it going even when you mess up. I wouldn't say you should be spending all your time practicing like that, just a enough to know that you can do it so that your playing is strong even when you make a mistake.

Ok thanks. In a band setting what is the most helpful way to keep my rhythm strong? Should i listen to the drums closely to make sure im hitting the right notes/chords in time?
#29
Listen to the whole sound, not just one instrument. You should know your part so well that you can focus on listening and not just playing the right notes. Just feel the groove.

You will notice if you are playing sloppily. Just keep your ears open. But if the only thing you can focus on is playing the right notes, of course you can't keep tempo (that's actually very common in beginner orchestras - everybody only focuses on playing the right notes, not on listening to what's happening in the music, and many times people will just blindly play what the notation says, even if they are playing the wrong part and it sounds horrible). If you know your part well and keep your ears open, you shouldn't have problems with timing.


But you'll understand it better when you start actually playing with other people.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#30
Quote by J23L
Ok thanks. In a band setting what is the most helpful way to keep my rhythm strong? Should i listen to the drums closely to make sure im hitting the right notes/chords in time?


Magga is right about listening to the "whole" thing, and it takes practice to isolate the pulse that's at the center of every song. There's quite a difference between hearing the rhythm and feeling the pulse. If you don't already, get in the habit of counting so you can't get lost in the rhythm. Keeping track of the downbeat is absolutely fundamental.

How often do you practice with -only- a metronome and no backing tracks? Backing tracks and recordings have a steady tempo, but they are providing the rhythm for you, when you should be able to produce that rhythm without help.

Think of it like singing a song in your car. When the song is on the radio, you can sing every note in time, on pitch, with the right words. Now try to sing that song by yourself with no music - suddenly the melodies, rhythms, and words are gone! What you can do by yourself shows how well you actually know a piece of music. When you're having trouble with something, isolate the guitar part and work it out slowly until it sounds musical all by itself.
#31
Quote by J23L
Ok thanks. In a band setting what is the most helpful way to keep my rhythm strong? Should i listen to the drums closely to make sure im hitting the right notes/chords in time?
I agree you should be listening to everything, but yes the drums first of all - assuming your drummer is good and solid.
Everyone in the band should have good time - not just be following the drummer - but rhythm is the drummer's only job. Everyone else has other jobs too.

A good tip for practising is to try playing scales or riffs with fret hand only - IOW entirely with hammer-ons and pull-offs. Do it to a metronome too. It's about getting your fret hand timing to be as good as your pick hand.
Typically we think timing is all in the pick hand - it ain't! If the fret hand is sloppy, then you will sound sloppy. Tighten up the fret hand too, get both hands dead in sync.

Simple stuff with good time = pro sound
Fancy stuff with poor time = amateur sound
Last edited by jongtr at Dec 20, 2015,
#32
I've used online band websites to find guitarists, so I know what kind of standards you need to be at to attract the attention of a band. I will say, if I found your post online and I needed, say a rhythm guitarist, or you PMed me on one of the sites with that Soundcloud, chances are I'd close the tab in the first few seconds, and that's the honest truth. First of all, you need a new username, it doesn't exactly scream 'I'm a professional', and I'm actually starting to wonder if it's making your recordings sound worse, as my first impression of you is that you aren't serious about what you do.

As for the actual playing, this has been covered, but it's no good at all. It makes you sound like you have bad gear and very poor technique. You're still asking questions like 'Who do I listen to to stay in time', so you're not ready yet. It's a real shame that you seem to have skipped the part where you and your friends at school play poor covers, as that stage in my playing helped me out so much, but you can catch up, play to some recordings, practice slow, play to a metronome and really focus on staying in time. Maybe even get some lessons, having someone guiding you will help so much, I've heard a lot of players who sound exactly like you, and none of them have had a guitar lesson in their lives.

Your rhythm should be inherent, you need to get to a point where you don't need to listen to anything, playing in time is just something that happens after experience and practice. Not only that, you should work on your ears, start transcribing and trying to learn songs by ear, you clearly can't hear your mistakes well, one day, if you stick at it, you'll listen to these recordings and cringe, because it'll be so much clearer where you're going wrong.

One thing that might be an idea, play along to recordings without Rocksmith. It'll force you to keep up with the tempo, phrase your melodies properly, and listen to an external source for your rhythm. Not only that, it's a lot more fun than playing to a metronome when you're at the stage in your playing that you are.
#33
Quote by CelestialGuitar
I've used online band websites to find guitarists, so I know what kind of standards you need to be at to attract the attention of a band. I will say, if I found your post online and I needed, say a rhythm guitarist, or you PMed me on one of the sites with that Soundcloud, chances are I'd close the tab in the first few seconds, and that's the honest truth. First of all, you need a new username, it doesn't exactly scream 'I'm a professional', and I'm actually starting to wonder if it's making your recordings sound worse, as my first impression of you is that you aren't serious about what you do.


I don't use SoundCloud. That profile i made was just so i can post the recordings on this site. I didn't make that SoundCloud with intentions of trying to be "professional".
#34
Quote by J23L
I don't use SoundCloud. That profile i made was just so i can post the recordings on this site. I didn't make that SoundCloud with intentions of trying to be "professional".


Fair enough then, as you mentioned you sent out recordings to find a band you were showing us what you were showing everyone you sent stuff out to.
#35
your sample 2 sounds real good till you start in on your power chords.
your picking with so much strength your pulling the strings out of tune.
or guitar is not intinated
#36
Quote by gocosfs
your sample 2 sounds real good till you start in on your power chords.
your picking with so much strength your pulling the strings out of tune.
or guitar is not intinated

Thanks. And yea the power chord part was a fail. I could play that section quite well 3 months ago, but i haven't played it since then until that recording. I forgot the feel of that part of the song and that's why it sounded the way it did. I don't think it had to do with the guitar's intonation. It was just that I forgot how to play it and was basically improvising that part.
Last edited by J23L at Dec 21, 2015,
#37
After listening to the recording, it sounds like you need to spend more time working out your own ideas, to the point that they sound the way you imagined them. What you're trying to do is within your reach, it just takes some patience to work up stuff that's above your current skill level.

I think your priorities should be getting used to counting rhythm all the time, and putting more time into technique.
#38
Quote by CelestialGuitar
Fair enough then, as you mentioned you sent out recordings to find a band you were showing us what you were showing everyone you sent stuff out to.

Hey man, did you think the quality of the recordings were ok? Not the actual playing, but the sound quality. I was recording it with my phone on top of my amp head so I don't know if that sounded bad or not. Do you think I should use something else to record? I don't want to seem like an amateur when sending stuff to people. I have amplitube. Should i use that instead?
Last edited by J23L at Dec 22, 2015,
#39
Quote by J23L
Hey man, did you think the quality of the recordings were ok? Not the actual playing, but the sound quality. I was recording it with my phone on top of my amp head so I don't know if that sounded bad or not. Do you think I should use something else to record? I don't want to seem like an amateur when sending stuff to people. I have amplitube. Should i use that instead?


yes. You should either mic your amp and put it through a mixer or run a line out from the amp into the recording device. Look on the back of your amp to see if it has a line out jack.

I know you can get GarageBand on the iPhone, which is a serviceable program for basic recording. Just use the audio jack instead of the phone's microphone.
#40
Yeah, definitely use something else than your phone mic - the sound quality wasn't that great (part of the reason why it also didn't sound that great was because your amp was too quiet - I could hear your guitar acoustically and that's not what you want). Pretty much anything will sound better than recording with your phone mic.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
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