#1
I have been playing a lot of metal as of late pantera, metallica, iron madien and the like. I find that when I play power chords high up the neck like 133xxx they sound kinda bad sorta rumbley not really clear sound just a groany sorta noise. Is that the way? Am I not pressing the notes hard enough because of the higher action up the neck. Any help would be just dandy
#2
Could be a number of things - are you pressing down hard enough (or too hard), are you muting correctly, are your pickups outputting at too high a volume, is your intonation correct?

Grab an electric tuner, make sure open E is in tune, and then try the individual notes of the chord to make sure they're in tune.

Try playing very softly to see if the noise goes away, then your pickups might need to be lowered.

Try to strum up from the highest string to make sure you only play the necessary notes and no duds.

Other than that idk man, hope someone else can help
#4
It could also be your amp settings - the lower down in the frequency range you go, the muddier your notes are going to sound. If you play a G major triad on a bass it's going to sound pretty naff
#6
Things to try:
roll off your volume a bit on your guitar
roll off your tone a bit on your guitar
Less treble
Less distortion
Make sure you are in tune
Switch Pickup


@cdgraves, that is like saying the A chord is bad. Chords, scales, etc are not bad or good, they are tools. You can use a hammer to build a house or kill a child, but the hammer is not good or evil. Stop living in ignorance.
#7
Quote by Blicer
Things to try:
roll off your volume a bit on your guitar
roll off your tone a bit on your guitar
Less treble
Less distortion
Make sure you are in tune
Switch Pickup


@cdgraves, that is like saying the A chord is bad. Chords, scales, etc are not bad or good, they are tools. You can use a hammer to build a house or kill a child, but the hammer is not good or evil. Stop living in ignorance.



it's called facetiousness.
#8
Quote by cdgraves
it's called facetiousness.


If you were being facetious, why didn't you use the facetious face?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#10
Yeah, but when you're an old guy that generally seems to hate fun, people just assume that you are serious about saying stuff like that.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#12
Is it really fair to consider an x5 chord on the top couple of strings north of the 12th fret a "power chord" anyway?

I'd think you need something at least as low as an E3 for the root, otherwise it'd be a plain old "double stop.".
#13
You said that there is higher action up the neck, which is true, but then tabbed out a 133xxx... That is the lower part of the neck, which should have lower action. Perhaps you meant 11-13-13-x-x-x? In that case you probably would need to intonate your guitar.

If you meant 133xxx:
Playing lower fret power chords can be difficult, similar to how bar chords can be difficult. You need to find a position where you have good leverage. Also, if you aren't already, make sure you are using your index, ring, and pinky. I've seen people try to use their middle for power chords... no bueno
#14
Quote by tommylaws16
I have been playing a lot of metal as of late pantera, metallica, iron madien and the like. I find that when I play power chords high up the neck like 133xxx they sound kinda bad sorta rumbley not really clear sound just a groany sorta noise. Is that the way? Am I not pressing the notes hard enough because of the higher action up the neck. Any help would be just dandy



Nah, the guitar honestly just doesn't produce tone as well in the upper registers, and the first strings to notice the difference are the ones with the most mass; the lower ones you play power chords on. When you play further up the neck, there's less string length actually vibrating, which means less amplitude of oscilation over the pickup, and less mass = less inertia = less momentum = less sustain, and on and on. Play an open E chord and then a barred E at the 12th fret and you'll see what I mean: less sustain, less power, sloppier attack, etc.

One way you can get a deeper/more complex/crunchier tone from the same frequencies is playing your power chord starting on the A string instead of the E in those situations where staying on the E string for your root note would force you up toward the 12th fret.
Last edited by lumberjack at Dec 31, 2015,