#3
Quote by dvm25


I love the sound of it. Any one know the model?

thanks
Model number notwithstanding, you'd need the studio quality reverb & delay units it's being played through to get, "that sound".

It's not a 316e.

Here's Taylor's current model page: https://www.taylorguitars.com/guitars/acoustic/category/nylon?items_per_page=12

The closest thing I see is the 514ce-N But that's a cutaway. Anyway the top on her guitar looks to be cedar. Same thing, no cut?

The only problem I'm having is the size. Her guitar looks to a genuine classical size, not as big as a "grand auditorium". But then, Taylor Swift tends to dwarf her GA & GS bodies, so who knows.

You could always go to her YouTube channel and ask her. Budding artists tend to be responsive. So then ".....lots of sunshine and praise.....". Then, "BTW what is that guitar you're playing". She is very, very, very good, so you won't have to lie...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 20, 2015,
#5
Quote by Tony Done
it's a slothead steel string, like a GC6, not a nylon string, (steel, not plastic, rollers) but in a quick search I couldn't find one of those with pickguard and non--cutaway. I would guess GC (*12) size, smaller than *16 size.
Wow, it sure is EQ'ed to sound like nylon....

Those G-x numbers are all discontinued, aren't they?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 20, 2015,
#6
OK, looking closely at the pic, it looks like plain 1st and 2nd strings to me, with a wound 3rd - not typical nylon. I just listened to it, I think it sounds like either a very expensive flamenco or half decent steel string to me. Of course, no reason not to use nylon strings on a piezo pickup system, and piezo quack can do that to the sound, but the neck width isn't that well-suited. - I've tried 1/34"with nylon, and even with my small hands, it feels too narrow. Garthman might jump in here.


Hmm, she plays it a lot better than than me., though maybe I could get there with practice.
#7
Quote by Tony Done
OK, looking closely at the pic, it looks like plain 1st and 2nd strings to me, with a wound 3rd -
Here, check it out in full screen:

You have to search it by title at YouTube, Hotel California - Gabriella Quevedo For some strange reason the website's add link function is working too well....

(If nothing else they might be Monel).

I can't figure out why the camera won't show a bronze color in ther strings. Maybe a sensor limitation...?
Quote by Tony Done
Hmm, she plays it a lot better than than me., though maybe I could get there with practice.
When (Pablo) Casals (then age 93) was asked why he continued to practice the cello three hours a day, he replied, “I’m beginning to notice some improvement.”
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 20, 2015,
#8
I really like that quote. I think I'm continuing to improve, though I find I'm much more interested in technique than in new tunes these days. - 100 different ways to play "House of the rising sun" OTOH, I reckon I'm getting senile, I listen to my old recordings and ask myself how I did it. So maybe all the supposedly new stuff is just old things I had forgotten.
#9
I play HoTRS too. It's one of the few tunes I can remember the chords all the way through. Although, just because my version mutates to 4/4 time after the first verse, is no reason to put me down...
#10
why not ask taylor? they usually get back to me with the answers to all sorts of questions. maybe it was a custom, but i LOVE their GC models.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#11
Quote by patticake
why not ask taylor? they usually get back to me with the answers to all sorts of questions. maybe it was a custom, but i LOVE their GC models.
We're still stuck on the video...

Apparently both Miss Queveda and Sungha Jung have the same teacher, (or arranger), as it were, Tomi Paldanius. Accordingly, both players versions of "Hotel" are virtually the same, note for note.

In any case, young Master Jung is playing what absolutely has to be a steel string acoustic. I'm seriously wondering how low that action and/or how light those strings need to be, for such a young player to master the instrument.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSIC1zJ3Nno

I don't think they're Tony's favorite mediums he's dealing with. Although....., they do look pretty fat in this video.

In any event, my first guitar was a steel string slot head, and I think I'm still traumatized from it.....

Maybe he knows some judo move to use the guitar's own weight against it....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 22, 2015,
#12
Quote by Tony Done
OK, looking closely at the pic, it looks like plain 1st and 2nd strings to me, with a wound 3rd - not typical nylon. I just listened to it, I think it sounds like either a very expensive flamenco or half decent steel string to me. Of course, no reason not to use nylon strings on a piezo pickup system, and piezo quack can do that to the sound, but the neck width isn't that well-suited. - I've tried 1/34"with nylon, and even with my small hands, it feels too narrow. Garthman might jump in here. ....

.


The guitar looks like one of the old GC models but perhaps it, something else that's now discontinued.

As for strings, it's hard to tell what they are when there are lots of effects in the mix. I keep an old dreadnought strung with hard tension nylon strings (3/4 neck - works for me). If I feed it through my Zoom multi-effects pedal I can make it sound like anything I want (but I only do that for fun).
#13
Quote by Garthman
....[ ].....As for strings, it's hard to tell what they are when there are lots of effects in the mix. I keep an old dreadnought strung with hard tension nylon strings (3/4 neck - works for me). If I feed it through my Zoom multi-effects pedal I can make it sound like anything I want (but I only do that for fun).
Is your dread a standard peg head, or a slot head?

I would swear that someone as small and young (*) as Sungha Jung wouldn't be able to handle steel strings on the type of material he's doing. Plus the strings on his guitar look 'fat' to me.

I mean it might be possible with electric regulars about 1/16" off the deck, but any heavier than that I can't picture.

(*) Check the "Hotel" video I posted. If the date is correct, he's about 12 and change.
#14
Hi, It looks to me like and older NS4 which I do not think is still being made.
There is also a model 214E which is also nylon classical model. It is selling at
Amazon presently. Regards
Norman2
Kenny Hill Estudio E640C
Last edited by Norman2 at Dec 21, 2015,
#15
Quote by Captaincranky
Is your dread a standard peg head, or a slot head? . . .


It's a paddle head, standard "D-28 a-like", all-laminate cheapie.

I've not had any problems with fitting nylon strings to the peg tuners - the only trick is to keep the strings under tension as you wind them up, especially the 1st, 2nd and 4th strings, otherwise you get too many loops around the peg. The only other things that needs doing is to widen the treble string nut slots a little to accommodate the thicker nylon strings (the basses are fine) and (usually) take some tension off the neck relief.

Fitting nylon strings to a guitar made for steel strings sometimes works well and sometimes doesn't. I've tried it on a few guitars and generally it seems to works best on cheapie all-lams - they sound better than solid tops with nylon. I've also tried nylons on my Recording King ROS-16 triple 0 slothead. Again the strings go onto the metal rollers OK and the result was actually quite good - but not as nice a sound as the dred - so the RK went back to steel which is fine because I love it - my 2nd most-played git after the nylon dred.

You have to try it to find out. Obviously it's going to sound very different to steel - not to everyone's taste, I'm sure, but I certainly enjoy mine.

(PS. I have an old Yamaha APX6N hybrid but I prefer the sound of the nylon strung dred).
Last edited by Garthman at Dec 21, 2015,
#16
If you go to the Taylor website, you'll see the naming system is pretty straightforward. I forget how the numbering works exactly for the nylon models.

The first number is type of back and sides, the second number is the sort of specialty category, and the third is body shape.

So, I'd take a guess, which is very much a guess, and say that's a 3 or 4 wood, and I think the nylons are 2s, but maybe 6 or something, I forget, there is 12 string and nylon which are the common differences from the 1s, if I recall. and then the last number is usually body shape, which I think might be unique for the nylons, because I want to say they are 27s. So, I'd guess a 327 or 427 or something. You should be able to find it easily enough on their website, unless it is a limited edition of sorts.

some models have a 'ce' tagged on the end, which means cutaway electric, of which this model is neither.

EDIT: Usually slotted heads mean nylon, but not always. After listening to this video it's definitely a nylon guitar, imo. I also have never personally come a cross a slotted steel string Taylor, and would imagine that something like that would be a custom job.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Dec 21, 2015,
#17
IMO, it isn't a nylon string model, unless it has been modded. - It has steel tuner posts and a pickguard.

This one is similar:



Maybe the same. - A Taylor GC6 according to the legend.

It doesn't sound particularly nylon to me, and the strings look like two plain steel and four wound.
#18
Quote by Tony Done
IMO, it isn't a nylon string model, unless it has been modded. - It has steel tuner posts and a pickguard.

This one is similar:



Maybe the same. - A Taylor GC6 according to the legend.

It doesn't sound particularly nylon to me, and the strings look like two plain steel and four wound.


You know what? upon further review, listening again, I would have to agree with you. I don't know what sort of crack I was on the first time I listened to it, but I'm pretty certain it is a steel string like you said. I find you can really hear it when her nails pick the higher strings.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Dec 21, 2015,
#19
Quote by fingrpikingood
If you go to the Taylor website, you'll see the naming system is pretty straightforward. I forget how the numbering works exactly for the nylon models.

The first number is type of back and sides, the second number is the sort of specialty category, and the third is body shape.

So, I'd take a guess, which is very much a guess, and say that's a 3 or 4 wood, and I think the nylons are 2s, but maybe 6 or something, I forget, there is 12 string and nylon which are the common differences from the 1s, if I recall. and then the last number is usually body shape, which I think might be unique for the nylons, because I want to say they are 27s. So, I'd guess a 327 or 427 or something. You should be able to find it easily enough on their website, unless it is a limited edition of sorts.

some models have a 'ce' tagged on the end, which means cutaway electric, of which this model is neither.
OK, we've been there and done that. The trouble is 1: Taylor hasn't always used their current nomenclature, and 2: I didn't find a slot head steelie in their current line. (Not that there isn't one mind you). The closest I came was a 514ce-N. But, that doesn't have a pick guard, and is a cedar top.

Whereas in the issue of nylon versus steel strings, the strings on that guitar, (IMHO), are pretty dead. Most of the razz-a-razzmatazz is coming from the ton of delay and reverb in the mix. Otherwise, she's playing in a Gothic cathedral, dressed up to look like her living room.

Still, the young lady's guitar doesn't appear to be as large as a GA model, hence my continued confusion.

As to where we are now in the hunt for the mystery guitar's identity, I'm starting to think, "I don't know", would have been the appropriate answer.

Because quite simply, the TS would have been better off asking, "who's delay and reverb is being used in this video? Because I know my guitar would sound like that if I had one.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 21, 2015,
#21
Quote by fingrpikingood
I have a feeling we could probably resolve this with a YouTube comment.
Ah yes, something I suggested back at post #3, last paragraph.
#22
Quote by Tony Done
IMO, it isn't a nylon string model, unless it has been modded. - It has steel tuner posts and a pickguard. . . .

. . . . It doesn't sound particularly nylon to me, and the strings look like two plain steel and four wound.


I agree.
#23
I still think the TS should be asking which reverb and delay units were being used in the recording, as opposed to which guitar...
#24
Quote by Captaincranky
I still think the TS should be asking which reverb and delay units were being used in the recording, as opposed to which guitar...


I agree with you too.
#25
She's fantastic! I don't know whether to be inspired or give up because I'll never reach a level even close. I can play that song but not like that!
#27
Quote by Tony Done
^^^^ You can do it. Just pick it apart note by noteusing a sound editor. She and the arrangement are both very good, but I don't hear anything that I would regard as technically overwhelming, like, say, Paul Gilbert playing a 1000 notes a second.

idk, i think for most people a lot of parts would be beyond their skill level. You could work up to it, but she does some tricky double thumb things, and even just that part where she plays those higher notes in quick succession is tough to get the timing correctly. It doesn't seem very fast, but it's kind of in that zone, where you can't get away with being sloppy on timing, but because it blasts by so fast people don't notice, and it's fast enough where it's difficult. It's actually somewhat of a tough piece, imo.

I mean I don't have a good grasp on your level, nor rodney's but I don't think a very large percentage of players are quite at that level. She's got a good level of dexterity going there, imo.
#29
^^^^ I hope you two realize the "Hotel" piece, isn't at the limit of this girl's abilities. Just search her on YouTube if you'd like to hear more.
#30
^^^^ Oh I don't doubt it. D'ya ever listen to Molly Tuttle? Her flatpicking should leave you gasping.

Gotta admit I've got a soft spot for female guitarists of many different persuasions. In no particular order:

Bonnie Raitt
Molly Tuttle
Rosetta Tharpe
Rory Block
Ana Popovic
Emily Remler
Eva Cassidy
Badi Assad


Were the first that came to mind.

Anyway, back on topic. It's interesting how that song lends itself to a Latin interpretation, eg the Gypsy Kings version. My meagre slide efforts are somewhat latinised, I use the first few bars of Lecuona's "Malaguena" as an intro.
#31
Quote by Captaincranky
^^^^ I hope you two realize the "Hotel" piece, isn't at the limit of this girl's abilities. Just search her on YouTube if you'd like to hear more.


Yeah, I've come across her before. She is quite skilled, and the arrangements are quite good, but idk, it's like there's something missing. Just not really my thing I guess. there's something sort of cold or mechanical about her style for me I think. Also, I really prefer a sort of improvisational aspect. A piece could be arranged, but when a performer allows themselves freedom, and does their thing a bit, I find it adds a lot. I find it really says something also about someone playing an arrangement like that, when you can't tell how much is rehearsed, and how much comes off the fly. For her it all seems very rehearsed to me. But she plays real clean at a pretty high skill level, and she writes nice arrangements. She's like a female version of sungha jung I guess. They're both good at what they do, it's just not right up my alley. They are both just going to get better also.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Dec 22, 2015,
#32
Quote by fingrpikingood
She's like a female version of sungha jung I guess. They're both good at what they do, it's just not right up my alley. They are both just going to get better also.
The same person arranged "Hotel" for her AND Jung. See the Jung video I posted in this thread.

Here's both of them:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egIcgSFf4Z8">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egIcgSFf4Z8https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egIcgSFf4Z8
Last edited by Captaincranky at Dec 22, 2015,
#33
Quote by Captaincranky
The same person arranged "Hotel" for her AND Jung. See the Jung video I posted in this thread.

Here's both of them:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egIcgSFf4Z8">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egIcgSFf4Z8https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egIcgSFf4Z8


I thought they did their own arrangements. Does she not usually arrange her own stuff? I was pretty sure jung did. Jung's timing is a actually a little bit better I find.
#34
lol I just noticed her age

She plays pretty good

Reminds me that I want to get my hands on a nylon string Taylor (because I think this piece would sound better on one)
My God, it's full of stars!
#36
Quote by fingrpikingood
I thought they did their own arrangements. Does she not usually arrange her own stuff? I was pretty sure jung did. Jung's timing is a actually a little bit better I find.
Here's the credit under the Sungha Jung video:
Published on Nov 13, 2013

Sungha http://www.sunghajung.com played "Hotel California" arranged by Tomi Paldanius.

Sungha Jung's All CD http://www.sunghajung.com
The video is Dated 2009. Tomi Palidinus is credited in the intro to Queveda's version.

You can actually hear both intros are the same, and are the weakest part of both piece(s) IMHO, of course.
#38
I admit I didn't read the whole thread.  The guitar is rosewood and spruce with abalone trim which and has a tight waist with a thick body.  If I'm not mistaken that would make it an 814 or a special edition.
Not taking any online orders.
#39
Quote by Tony Done
IMO, it isn't a nylon string model, unless it has been modded. - It has steel tuner posts and a pickguard.

This one is similar:



Maybe the same. - A Taylor GC6 according to the legend.

It doesn't sound particularly nylon to me, and the strings look like two plain steel and four wound.

Nice red couch... Great looking guitar though!
Soli De gloria
#40
Quote by FrankenTaylor
Nice red couch... Great looking guitar though!
I never noticed the couch design. It's not clear in my mind as to whether the design is contemporary Southwest Americana, or early neolithic caveman. But, there is a great deal of elegance there, and not knowing doesn't matter.