#1
Hi there!
I want to ask You, can I tune baritone guitar (strings B-E-A-D-F#-B) to standard E tuning?
Thank you in advance for help.
#2
You definitely could, but you might have to use slightly lighter gauge strings if you want to maintain the same tension as a regular guitar. For example, if you usually play a strat with 10s, try the baritone with 9s.
#3
Yes, but depending on the exact scale you might want to use like 9s or 8s to avoid putting a lot of unnecessary strain on the neck.
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#4
You might have to use a set of 8s.
But it also depends on the scale length. A true baritone with a 28.625 or 30 scale length will be difficult. But the so called baritones on he market right now are usually 27 which will be fine with maybe 9s.
It will be tight though.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#5
Yeah, like everyone else said, try 8s. On thing though, if it is a 28-30 inch scale, or even with the 27" those strings are going to be tight as all get out, and with them being so thin, it may not feel all that great.
#6
Quote by szczepcio
Hi there!
I want to ask You, can I tune baritone guitar (strings B-E-A-D-F#-B) to standard E tuning?
Thank you in advance for help.


Of course.
9, 10 and even 11 gauge strings will work fine. Gauges heavier than that may put undue tension on the neck, depending on the scale. You may need to adjust your truss rod and your intonation after changing the tuning.
#7
Yes. Some people do this because they have huge hands, others do it because extended scale guitars can get absurdly twangy.

String tension shouldn't be an issue if the guitar was made recently. Most extended range guitars have reinforcement rods that run alongside the truss rod to keep the neck from bending under extreme tension.
#8
I use a 30"baritone in a high tuning because of its good tone and sustain, using 13-56 strings in open D. This is an equivalent tension to a standard 25.5"scale in open F. The strings feel very tight, as if the high ones are going to break. If I wanted to go to E standard and play in reasonable comfort, I wouldn't be attempting it with standard low-tuned bari strings, I would go down to 12-53 or smaller.
#9
Quote by Tony Done
I use a 30"baritone in a high tuning because of its good tone and sustain, using 13-56 strings in open D..


A 30" scale guitar isn't usually referred to as a baritone (though obviously if you can tune there, you can call it whatever you like). Most baritones are in the 27-28" scale range, while bbasses begin around 30".
#10
^^^^ It is an OLP MM5, described as a bari and strung that way originally. I agree that it is in that borderline area between bari and bass. Here's a pic:



I inlaid the dolphin at the 14th fret as an octave marker, because I often use it with a capo on the 2nd.

I could go on about it good qualities at length, but sufficient to say that the way I have it strung at very high tension, it sizzles like telephone wires in the wind.
#12
Played an Epiphone Baritone Flying V (don't know exactly who it belonged to but it is a signature model) and it was in B standard and I took it down to Drop A. Felt GREAT!