#1
Hello guys, i've been playing electric guitar for about 6 months and i am 17 years old.
Im currently playing about 2 hours minimum a day. Im listening to music ALL the time.
My lifelong dream is to become a lead guitarist for a metal band, and i need some help.

My knowledge: (i've probably missed somethings)

1. I can calculate the name of any string and fret.

2. Im famillar with intervalls but i wouldn't say i know them

3. I know the pentagonic scale and the major scale.

4. I can play famous riffs from, (some better than others)
Master of puppets
Welcome home
This means war
No more teras
Paranoid (inc 60% of the solo)
Iron man
Rose of sharyn
Seek and destroy
Crazy train
Aces high
Ich tu dir weh
Kickstart my heart
Rock you like a hurricane
Come as you are
Breaking the law
Cirice
Electric funeral
Heaven and hell
Raining blood
Symphony of destruction
Chop suey
Ace of spades

Now i need help to really grow and improve so if someone could please make a lesson for me that would last for about 2 hours

Help me make my lifelong dream come true!
Last edited by Maxfalk at Dec 21, 2015,
#2
I won't make you anything, I'm too lazy for that. I will, however, give you some pointers to consider.

1. Branch out musically. Learn some stuff from other genre's of music. Blues, Country, Jazz, Punk, Classic Rock, Funk, R&B, and so forth. You may not like those types of music, but they add techniques to your arsenal.

2. Keep working on your use of effects. While slamming ten thousand notes per-second and sweeping like a madman looks and sounds cool - it gets old really fast if your set is filled with them. A good lead guitarist needs to be able to do a lot of different things to add flavors to each song and not sound redundant/repetitive/stale. The use of effects can add new dimensions to your playing.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#3
Quote by ThunderPunk
Branch out musically. Learn some stuff from other genre's of music. Blues, Country, Jazz, Punk, Classic Rock, Funk, R&B, and so forth. You may not like those types of music, but they add techniques to your arsenal.

Trüe wørdz.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#4
Quote by Maxfalk
Hello guys, i've been playing electric guitar for about 6 months and i am 17 years old.
Im currently playing about 2 hours minimum a day. Im listening to music ALL the time.
My lifelong dream is to become a lead guitarist for a metal band, and i need some help.

My knowledge: (i've probably missed somethings)

1. I can calculate the name of any string and fret.

2. Im famillar with intervalls but i wouldn't say i know them

3. I know the pentagonic scale and the major scale.

4. I can play famous riffs from, (some better than others)
Master of puppets
Welcome home
This means war
No more teras
Paranoid (inc 60% of the solo)
Iron man
Rose of sharyn
Seek and destroy
Crazy train
Aces high
Ich tu dir weh
Kickstart my heart
Rock you like a hurricane
Come as you are
Breaking the law
Cirice
Electric funeral
Heaven and hell
Raining blood
Symphony of destruction
Chop suey
Ace of spades

Now i need help to really grow and improve so if someone could please make a lesson for me that would last for about 2 hours

Help me make my lifelong dream come true!


You get what you pay for.
#5
Play those songs you know *all the way through*.
Record yourself playing with them so that you can see where you lose timing, etc.

Play with other people. Whole songs. Sing with them, even if you aren't going to be a singer.

Play standing.
#6
Thanks for the advices i really like this page people are so nice here
#7
Quote by Maxfalk
Thanks for the advices i really like this page people are so nice here

Welcome.

You just need to practice and play with other people.

Deff learn other styles if for nothing but variety and remember it can take years to get proficient so keep at it even when it seems like you've hit a wall technically and creatively.

And playing other peoples songs is fine, but writing your own is where it is really at if your a true musician.
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#9
I'll go along with what most have said here in terms of branching out, both in style as well as technical knowledge. One way to explore this in an easy deviation from what you already know since you're already familiar with the pentatonic scale (and I assume the pentatonic box), is to apply that scale to a major rather than a minor chord progression as a minor 3rd pentatonic scale. That would broaden your perspective on the pentatonic scale considerably.

If you have a major chord progression most commonly seen in country music, you can play in a box similar to the pentatonic box, but just slide that box down four frets from the base key. So if the song is in the key of A and you would normally play your normal pentatonic box at the fifth fret, play a basic pentatonic box starting at the F# fret (second fret) against a song in A major. Your ear should begin to pick up the nuances of how that scale fits and blends differently with a major chord progression.

Pick a country song you're familiar with and try it and I think it will open your eyes to some new possibilities. Many well known guitarists play a combination of regular pentatonic and minor 3rd pentatonic scales when confronted with a song that has major chords in a minor chord progression. A very useful and fundamental skill to understand. I'm often quite amazed at how many guitarists who have been playing for years have never been exposed to this simple technique.
Last edited by dunedindragon at Dec 22, 2015,
#10
Quote by dunedindragon
I'll go along with what most have said here in terms of branching out, both in style as well as technical knowledge. One way to explore this in an easy deviation from what you already know since you're already familiar with the pentatonic scale (and I assume the pentatonic box), is to apply that scale to a major rather than a minor chord progression as a minor 3rd pentatonic scale. That would broaden your perspective on the pentatonic scale considerably.

If you have a major chord progression most commonly seen in country music, you can play in a box similar to the pentatonic box, but just slide that box down four frets from the base key. So if the song is in the key of A and you would normally play your normal pentatonic box at the fifth fret, play a basic pentatonic box starting at the F# fret (second fret) against a song in A major. Your ear should begin to pick up the nuances of how that scale fits and blends differently with a major chord progression.

Pick a country song you're familiar with and try it and I think it will open your eyes to some new possibilities. Many well known guitarists play a combination of regular pentatonic and minor 3rd pentatonic scales when confronted with a song that has major chords in a minor chord progression. A very useful and fundamental skill to understand. I'm often quite amazed at how many guitarists who have been playing for years have never been exposed to this simple technique.



Thanks for the effort but i didnt quite get what you meant, can someone please explain abit
Last edited by Maxfalk at Dec 22, 2015,
#11
Quote by Maxfalk
Hello guys, i've been playing electric guitar for about 6 months and i am 17 years old.
Im currently playing about 2 hours minimum a day. Im listening to music ALL the time.
My lifelong dream is to become a lead guitarist for a metal band, and i need some help.

My knowledge: (i've probably missed somethings)

1. I can calculate the name of any string and fret.

2. Im famillar with intervalls but i wouldn't say i know them

3. I know the pentagonic scale and the major scale.

4. I can play famous riffs from, (some better than others)
Master of puppets
Welcome home
This means war
No more teras
Paranoid (inc 60% of the solo)
Iron man
Rose of sharyn
Seek and destroy
Crazy train
Aces high
Ich tu dir weh
Kickstart my heart
Rock you like a hurricane
Come as you are
Breaking the law
Cirice
Electric funeral
Heaven and hell
Raining blood
Symphony of destruction
Chop suey
Ace of spades

Now i need help to really grow and improve so if someone could please make a lesson for me that would last for about 2 hours

Help me make my lifelong dream come true!


here's the most important lesson anyone can propose if you want to be able to create music and invent your own songs and solos: start learning songs and solos BY EAR.

Pick songs that are slow to start, such as early Sabbath etc. It takes a lot of time at first but it is really what separates real musicians from amateurs. You don't need to spend all your time on this, but make it a consistent priority. It is one of most crucial things to work on as a musician and a many avoid it completely, because tab and software shortcuts are everywhere.
#12
i'm a newb too

my perspective is like:

you need a billion hours of finger technique practice

a billion hours of chord transition practice (not to mention cleanliness)

learn just a handful of songs until you feel like your technique is decent otherwise you can, i assume, waste a lot of time/resources trying to learn new things instead of getting mechanically better

learn the CAGED major/minor/pent scales from the link below (he links a PDF) and after that progress towards being able to identify notes by ear

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Phcxx_-L-_c

https://www.youtube.com/user/pebberbrown/videos?view=0&sort=p&flow=grid

dont worry about practicing standing up: your beginners technique will improve whether you're sitting or standing (this applies to me, maybe not to you)

everyone here says having a few lessons is invaluable, either for theory or technique

i'm a nub likely moreso than you these are just some things

did you say you learnt all the notes on the fretboard? i havent done that yet , so far ive just learnt pentatonic shapes and starting the major/minor shapes. i literally dont know what the strings of the guitar are, G A E something G . it just hasn't come up yet, the future holds many things! i think i will learn the letters when i start learning the sounds to put to the letters........maybe that will work
Last edited by percydw at Dec 22, 2015,
#13
So you can play riffs and you know some scales, why not throw in some solos? Always be pushing yourself just slightly out of your range of skill.

Also as others have said branching out musically will inspire and improve your playing. Even if you wish to stay within the genre of metal consider learning power, black, and since you like doom metal try some of the weirder more relaxed stuff (my sleeping karma, Bong, etc) Different is good. Since you like that hair metal stuff consider looking into visual kei as well, very similar in terms of many things such as song structure and that anthem style rock meets metal although the chords and scales they use are very different.
#14
is that yui in your pic btw?
i got her the other day
youtu.be/sYEsx8UVR5k?t=29
#15
Quote by percydw
is that yui in your pic btw?
i got her the other day
youtu.be/sYEsx8UVR5k?t=29

It's actually Misaki from Nhk
http://www.darkmirage.com/images/blog/20051204_misaki.jpg

I have yet to watch k-on but I learned a few of their songs on guitar lol they are good fun.

This is fun to bust out sometimes (if you have tab pro here is link)
https://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/m/misc_cartoons/k-on_-_azusa_solo_guitar_pro.htm
#17
You can do it! just takes practice, it is short enough it would be a good learning experience for you as well without becoming to overwhelming, plus it's something you are familiar enough with, and when you play it people will be impressed even if they aren't people who like anime or know what it's from.

If i was learning it I would start with the first measure, ignoring the bend at 12 14 (first bend) and just do the 14 bend instead there.

I would use my first finger to barre (sort of) the 12th fret high e, I then use my pinky to pull off the 15to12 (you can use third finger, whatever feels easier I think) and then bend 14 again (use the strength of pointer middle and third to help you hit the note so it sounds right) I'd practice that, it's also a really good little lick. Remember to practice slow (using tab pro slow down to maybe .20 or slower as need be, maybe just use your own metronome at first even)

Based on your earlier post this is probably your first solo so it will be intimidating and frustrating but it will give you such a good foundation when you are done.
Last edited by Blicer at Dec 22, 2015,
#18
It would be very helpful if you could post a video of you playing a solo. Do you take lessons? If you don't you will properly have bad habits, getting them early is best and we can help you identify them.
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#19
aha dat encouragement lol
i have way too much to practice already with way too little time
i make solo already here youtube.com/watch?v=n3-_GrkHrgs and here youtube.com/watch?v=o6i0nMnVhxs
over christmas i practice scales and aim at learning fretboard
time for solos will come again!! *stares down pink floyd comfortably numb and wishbone ash throw down the sword*


edit: nice your encouragement made me go and record my miku melt solo and i played it best ever (dont practice it much) lol
youtube.com/watch?v=x3ZQJZSy2s8
also i think whatever amplitube effect this is can make anything sound good lol

note to everyone i am NOT the op
Last edited by percydw at Dec 22, 2015,
#20
Quote by percydw
aha dat encouragement lol
i have way too much to practice already with way too little time


Every guitarist is like that. It's literally endless, how much there is to learn. But every guitarist has strengths and weaknesses, and a goal in mind.

That's why a good teacher can be helpful, because they can look at you, see that, know where you are going, and have you practice only the things pertinent to you.

When you post questions like OPs on a public forum, you get all kinds of guitarists from all kinds of levels giving all kinds of suggestions. Some say you need this, and some say you need that, but often times people will say you don't need something, and it's something they don't even really know, like theory for example. Someone might say you don't need any theory, and they don't know any theory, so really, they are not in a very solid position to say whether or not you do need a certain part of theory, because they don't know it, nor the benefits.

They also won't know you that well, and might not recognize really what your strengths and weaknesses are.

The truth is, we can all go to any guitar website, and see lists of things to learn, and we can talk about learning songs as well. The information is there, and you could sit down and just try to learn all of it, but I wouldn't recommend that.

The real crucial thing, imo, is to be able to trim the fat, and really take steps forward in a solid and logical order, instead of spending a bunch of time learning something, and then a year later, you learn something else that wish you had learned it a year ago, instead of what you had spent your time on.

Idk your aim, but OP wants to become the best that he can possibly become, which is a higher skill level than the vast majority of the people here.

Teaching yourself is tough. If I could send myself back in time to teach myself, I would be really down with that. I can tell you from experience. I am self taught, and I'm quite a skilled player, but I know I could have learned more efficiently and more quickly.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Dec 22, 2015,
#21
Don't get obsessed by technique ... it is much more important to build up musicality. So, try and balance this with your technique work. Learn songs, work on playing melodically over slow and medium speed tunes ... that forces you not to rely on high-speed. This is much more challenging. Work on feel playing. Work on expressiveness (dressing up notes, especially with accurate slides and different vibrato techniques, and accurate bends)

If you want to develop your own style, work at rhythm and phrasing. Learn to play be ear (e.g. use Transcribe to work out tunes by ear).

Most of all, be realistic ... this all takes time.
#22
As I wrote elsewhere:
But then go about trying new stuff. ANYTHING new will be a challenge to your mind and skills, even if only briefly.

Try new musical genres. I don't particularly dig country, but I did learn a couple of tunes by Willie Nelson and Johnny Cash...and grew to like playing them.

Try new tunings. I currently play in Standard and NST, but I'm considering DADGAD, and will probably try Open G if I try to learn slide. This also works if you try to relearn songs you already know in those other tunings.

Try learning a song back to front...or even turn your sheet music upside down. Pianist/comedian extraordinaire Victor Borge used to do the upside down thing in his act. He'd play for a while, then- "realizing his error"- would apologize, flip the music to the correct orientation, and start playing correctly.

Try playing songs in different time signatures. By that, I mean try playing a song you know in an unfamiliar beat. I know a jazz pianist who can play the song "Take Five" in its original 5/4, but also in 3/4, 4/4, 6/4 and 7/4. Each variant completely changes the feel of the tune.

Try mimicking song parts written for other instruments or even for singers. One of Prince's touring guitarists was struggling with learning to play a piece in a way that made his boss happy. Prince told him to learn to play the part as if it were being sung by Billie Holiday.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#23
Look in your private messages, I sent you some mail. I can make a lesson for you. I took around 20 music lessons in my life (12 for guitar, 8 for bass)

I know decent USEFUL AND PRACTICAL theory from a jazz bassplayer, and perfect guitar handling technique from a virtuoso lead guitar.

I'm not a total blazing shredder, but I can DEFINITELY help you out. Check it out.