#1
Hi, I'm just wondering what are your thoughts on short scale guitars (24.5). I saw an ad on my area selling a used PRS Fredrik Akesson for $589 Cdn and I am wondering if the short scale length would greatly affect the way I play as I am currently using a 25.5 scale guitar. Any experiences and tips regarding this topic is greatly appreciated! Thanks!
#2
pretty much every guitar will feel different at first and will take adjusting to, but after a week tops you should have little issue finding your way around (assuming you aren't jumping from a 12 fret to 24 for example)
I love the short scale sound too but thats entirely up to you and what you like to play. I would just go down to the shop and play around with it for awhile.
I love that guitar and it's got a great sound, Nice and dark. I just hate the location of the switch and the lack of a floyd rose lol.
#3
It definitely affects the feel of the guitar (or the string tension, rather - I have 25,5'', 25'', 24,75'' and 24'' guitars) and you need higher gauge strings to compensate unless you want the strings to feel like spaghetti and bend out of tune as you apply the pressure you're used to.

But no, I don't think it will greatly affect the way you play. Unless you tune down quite a bit from E Standard, I can't see any drawbacks with this shorter scale length (if you do that, it gets harder to intonate well).
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#5
Pretty sure all PRS SE guitars are 25" scale except the 245 and Bernie marsden which are 24.5" )and the baritone models of course.

But I have no issues playing 24.5, 25 or 25.5 scales, I own a few of each.
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#6
Thanks for the replies! So for a short scale a .09 string is not recommended then? I usually go to around C# tuning.
#8
C# tuning I'd use beefy slinky's or something similar in gauge

and your nut will need to be re-slotted for those strings. You will also need to adjust the action, neck relief and intonation
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#9
Scales shorter than 24.75" are useful for playing jazz chords that require long stretches.
#10
Oh dang, sorry if may sound stupid but I have limited knowledge about guitars as I just started playing an electric guitar ~5 months ago. So with this one I need to change something about its nut?

Should I just get a brand new 25.5 haha (Schecter Stealth c-1)?
#11
The size of your hands makes a difference, if you've got huge sausage fingers you won't want to play shortscale. If you have smaller hands shortscale will save you from carpal tunnel and general discomfort.
#12
Quote by hahahahaha014

Should I just get a brand new 25.5 haha (Schecter Stealth c-1)?


Same deal, with C# tuning you will still have to widen the nut slots for a gauge that works comfortably. - The difference between 24.75 and 25.5 is only half a fret, or 1/4 of tone.- nothing like the three semitone difference between E and C#.
#13
getting thicker gauge strings on such a guitar will take a bit of work. I see no reason why .09 would be bad? that's the opposite of thick. .11 is where things would get hairy.
#14
Quote by Blicer
getting thicker gauge strings on such a guitar will take a bit of work. I see no reason why .09 would be bad? that's the opposite of thick. .11 is where things would get hairy.


.09 in C# is EXTREMELY floppy. but, if it works for the OP than i guess its fine>

i use .12's in C#std, and they are still a little floppy.

also, i did have to do some minor nut work on my SG that low though (24.75).

i am indifferent between 25.5 and 24.75. most people don't have problems going back and fourth.

however, the 24" (fender short scale) i detest. you run out of room in the 12+ fret zone of the neck. at least i do.
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#16
I guess getting a short scale guitar has a lot of minor issues that I am not capable of resolving on my own (nut adjustments, thicker strings, lower tunings) haha. I will look further into this, but I may just get a longer scale guitar! Thanks everyone! Happy holidays.
#17
I have one of those Fredrik Åkesson guitars. It's a joy to play, even though I'm used to a 25.5" scale I can switch between them effortlessly. But I'm not tuning down and would use a longer scale length for that.
#18
Quote by hahahahaha014 at #33742208
I guess getting a short scale guitar has a lot of minor issues that I am not capable of resolving on my own (nut adjustments, thicker strings, lower tunings) haha. I will look further into this, but I may just get a longer scale guitar! Thanks everyone! Happy holidays.

Any time, regardless of scale length, if you're taking a guitar that was set up for standard and going to a lower tuning you will need thicker strings so they're not floppy, which will mean you'll have to set it up differently - probably wider nut slots, as well as adjusting action, intonation, and neck relief. None of these are particularly hard to do, except maybe filing the nut slot because that's easier to screw up, but that may not be necessary depending on the guitar. Look up some guides on the internet.

The advantages of having longer scale lengths are just that they tend to sound better, especially with lower tunings. Bass guitars and baritone guitars have a lot longer scale length because they're meant to be tuned lower. It makes it easier to have more tension with the same action, which gives better sustain and a fuller sound, and it's easier to have accurate intonation.

The advantages of shorter scale lengths is mainly about how it feels to play. If you have small hands or like to play things that require further stretches, or just generally like the way they feel, then short scale guitars are better for that.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Dec 23, 2015,