#1
I'm realizing that I want to play with more tunings, and want to work on a game plan to acquire a few more so I don't have to screw around retuning everytime I see something in another tuning.

Right now, I'm looking at covering the following tunings:

EADGBE
DADGBE
CGCFAD
and possibly
EbAbDbGbBbEb

So, basically, I'm looking to bring my total up to a count of 4 by the end of this.

[Billy Mays]
But wait, there's more!
[/Billy Mays]

I've enjoyed the lowered tunings, and had my low E string down to C to play with for a bit (it's back at E), so I have flirted with the idea of bringing a 7-string into the equation. I tried out a Jackson JS22-7, which as metal as it may be, was afraid of shredding my hand on the fretboard, as well as the Schecter Demon-7---Amazing to reach the low B string with almost no effort.

I was originally thinking of tuning the 7-string like F or G CGCFAD, but that doesn't look like a common 7-string tuning, so I'm not sure if that part will work. Would be nice, but not a must.

The other thing is since I switch a lot between E Standard and Drop D is something called a pitch key. It seems like a good thing to allow change between the tuning of a string, but I don't know how it does in real-world use.

This isn't a specific buying thread, so much as establishing a direction. It would be cool to have hundreds of guitars, but I need a purpose for them.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#2
First, the reason for getting a 7 string is often not to be able to go lower, but to be able to stay in one place on the fretboard while covering a larger range in arpeggios, etc..

And, sometimes, it's to be able to go lower. Wait until you notice that Rondo Music also has 8, 9 and 10-string guitars.

I have a lot of guitars, but after a while the idea of having a guitar lying around just to handle another tuning didn't make sense. Beyond the down and drop tunings, there are the tunings that offer open chords, etc., and you get to a point where you almost have to label them to remember what goes where. Unless you're the GooGoo Dolls, it's a waste of guitars and space.

Some years ago I tried a Variax 500 guitar. It basically does two things: it has electronics built in that model a very wide range of guitars and other string instruments, and it allows you to use pitch replacement technology to output a tuning for each individual string that's up to an octave on either side of where it's actually tuned, while never affecting the tension of the actual string. It's a little weird in the bedroom because the guitar is still in standard tuning, but what's coming out of the amp is something complete different. Once the amp is louder than the guitar (or you're wearing headphones and not hearing the guitar itself), it just sounds like the guitar, but in that alternate tuning.

Since I first picked up the Variax 500, I've added three more Variax guitars. One is an acoustic looking guitar (the Acoustic 700) and two are current JTV-89F models.

The JTV-89F (the "F" stands for Floyd Rose) allows you to do something you can't do on any other Floyd Rose-equipped guitar: change the tuning without affecting the bridge. Even if you're not dive-bombing all over the place, the Floyd setup still manages to keep your guitar in better tune than do most standard bridge/nut/tuner setups. AND you can dive-bomb and pull up.

The 89F was designed specifically as a metal guitar (25.5" scale, 16" fretboard radius, jumbo frets, 24-fret guitar with really good upper-fret access, etc.), and Variax included down- and drop-tunings all the way down to Baritone on the rotary switch that allows you to change them. The other JTV Variax guitars actually have a wider range of usable tunings (Open G, Blues G, etc.). But as it turns out, you can also change tunings on the guitar quickly and easily (using something called Virtual Capo) *and* you can plug the guitar into the computer through, say, a Line 6 Pod, and run editing software that will allow you to change to almost any tuning and save it to the factory positions.

But wait, there's more. If you have one of the higher end Pods (either the "live" floor version or the rack version), you can actually save alternate tuning (and guitar model) information into the same Pod user presets that can also carry your amp/cab/FX choices. This means that you can change tunings instantly with a single stomp, in the middle of a song (in the middle of a measure, if need be).

I've glossed over the fact that you have something like 29 guitar models built into the thing from the factory. The strat and tele and LP emulations are bang on the money. With one exception. Single coil pickups on those guitars are subject to RF interference from neon signs, voltage fluctuations caused by bar ice machines, etc., but not on the Variax. No noise.

There's more, of course, that's not exactly on topic. There's editing software that will allow you to essentially "build" other guitars and other guitar sounds. This is something like having an unlimited supply of pickups, capacitors, switches, guitar bodies, etc., to play with. You can "move" the location of pickups (changing the sound when you do) and much more.

The bad news: Most Guitar Centers sell them, but don't have them in stock. The JTV-89F is the most expensive of the lot, at $1199. Given what it can replace, however, it's a bargain.
#3
Quote by bjgrifter


The other thing is since I switch a lot between E Standard and Drop D is something called a pitch key. It seems like a good thing to allow change between the tuning of a string, but I don't know how it does in real-world use.


That's also known as a D-Tuna. http://www.dtuna.com/index.php
#4
I have a collection about 1/2 the size of dspellman's if I read his posting history right. I currently play in only 2 tunings- E standard and NST- and have a variety of guitars to cover different tones in each: acoustics, humbucker, SSS, P90s, or mixes like HSS or H/P90; hardtails & trems; solidbody, semihollow and hollowbody.

The only time I regret buying one is when I trip over the hardshell.

And since I want to try some DADGAD as well as slide in open G, more guitars will be added.

(Like I need an excuse.)
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#6
Quote by slapsymcdougal
I think he means


Works on non-floyd equipped guitars.


That looks seriously lame-ass, and potentially dangerous <G>.

Hipshot makes something that's probably better:




http://store.hipshotproducts.com/cart.php?m=product_list&c=7

I've seen guitars that have several of these on a single peghead, but I've seen these more often on basses:

Last edited by dspellman at Dec 23, 2015,
#7
Could be. Never used either, tbh, so have no basis for comparison except what google can tell me.
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#9
I wouldn't buy a guitar just to drop a single string.

There's always this guy:



Or like you say, a 7 string is a also a good option.
#10
Quote by dthmtl3
I wouldn't buy a guitar just to drop a single string.

There's always this guy:


.


Important to understand, however, what it can and cannot do.
#12
Quote by dannyalcatraz
I have a collection about 1/2 the size of dspellman's if I read his posting history right. I currently play in only 2 tunings- E standard and NST- and have a variety of guitars to cover different tones in each: acoustics, humbucker, SSS, P90s, or mixes like HSS or H/P90; hardtails & trems; solidbody, semihollow and hollowbody.

The only time I regret buying one is when I trip over the hardshell.

And since I want to try some DADGAD as well as slide in open G, more guitars will be added.

(Like I need an excuse.)


I am sitting around where danny is, and do the same thing.

I have most in Estd.

Three in C#std (one with a Floyd, two hardtail)

Three in open G. (two hardtail and a strat trem)
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#13
Thanks, dspellman. I don't think I'll be doing the Goo Goo Dolls just yet because I'm not famous. I've seen the tabs and understand why a book for Dizzy Up the Girl never flowed at all.

I figure CGCFAD is going to merit a separate guitar, because I understand that tuning tends to require thicker gauge strings. I'm less opposed to having one guitar that's for E standard\Drop D. I'd almost go Drop D entirely, but I feel I'd really miss out on instructional videos since it's in E.

I have read enough hear that made me want to air out my ideas because money won't buy me skills. I'm looking at additions like I do a tool purchase: it's small, but what I have covers what I need to do.

I don't know how great the impact of changing tuning is once you have the intonation set. I assume there is an impact, but to what degree is the question.

I still love how the Demon-7 handled, but I'm not sold on that I'll actually use it. I will say that if the neck on that is like other Schecters, that has me pretty much at "take my money".
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#14
Quote by bjgrifter


The other thing is since I switch a lot between E Standard and Drop D is something called a pitch key. It seems like a good thing to allow change between the tuning of a string, but I don't know how it does in real-world use.

This isn't a specific buying thread, so much as establishing a direction. It would be cool to have hundreds of guitars, but I need a purpose for them.


1) my bandmate has the pitch key ( or something similar) on his Gibson - it works very well.

2) I would suggest having one separate guitar for the more drastic lowered tuning, because your intonation will be completely screwed if you go from standard to changing all the strings.
#15
Where can I get the pitch key in the US? I see it for the UK for a about 20 Pounds. Otherwise, the hipshot is around $50-60 for the GT2 on Amazon (vs. double that on their site). I'd like to think the Hipshot would work on my Squire Bullet Strat because it's Fenders own budget line, but I don't want to assume that and find out the hipshot doesn't work, which is why the pitch key is a little more ideal from that standpoint.
Guitar/Bass:
Schecter: Damien 6/Stilletto Extreme 5, Squier: Bullet HSS*, Washburn RX10*/WG-587, Agile Septor 727
*mods

Amps/FX
Peavey: Vypyr 30/Max 112 (200W), ISP: Decimator

Quote by dannyalcatraz
Understood- I waste money on amps*, too.

justinguitar.com is the answer
#16
Quote by bjgrifter
Where can I get the pitch key in the US? I see it for the UK for a about 20 Pounds. Otherwise, the hipshot is around $50-60 for the GT2 on Amazon (vs. double that on their site). I'd like to think the Hipshot would work on my Squire Bullet Strat because it's Fenders own budget line, but I don't want to assume that and find out the hipshot doesn't work, which is why the pitch key is a little more ideal from that standpoint.


The hipshot is actually what my friend has ( I couldn't recall the name until you posted this) , it works great.