#1
Got an Epi LP a little over a month ago. The other day I was reading about intonation, and decided to check it on my LP via a Digitech Hardwire Tuner Pedal. On most strings it seems a bit sharp on the 12th fret (~1/3 to 1/2 way to the right 'edge' on the tuner, so say about a 1/4 of the way to the next step up - F in the case of the low E, for instance). Is this even far enough off to bother messing with?

I've never tried this before, but watched a few videos and read up on it and it seems simple enough. The only weird thing is the screws are actually under the strings (pointed back up the neck), but I should be able to reach in there with a small screwdriver.

Also, I picked up the guitar the other day and it was way out of tune (after a couple of days of not playing). If the intonation is set right, will it minimize the guitar getting out of tune between playing sessions? This article seems to imply so:
http://www.deanmarkley.com/multimedia/instructions-index/how-to-keep-your-guitar-in-tune

Any other tips / comments / etc...?
#2
Quote by lmychajluk
Is this even far enough off to bother messing with?

It's up to you.
Also, I picked up the guitar the other day and it was way out of tune (after a couple of days of not playing). If the intonation is set right, will it minimize the guitar getting out of tune between playing sessions?

No. Intonating a guitar to play in tune assumes that the open notes are also in tune. Intonating the guitar is pointless otherwise.

The reason your guitar keeps going out of tune is most likely either changes in temperature, a poorly cut nut, or the guitar not being strung properly. Quite possibly all 3 things are causing the problem.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Dec 23, 2015,
#3
Quote by lmychajluk at #33742848
On most strings it seems a bit sharp on the 12th fret (~1/3 to 1/2 way to the right 'edge' on the tuner, so say about a 1/4 of the way to the next step up - F in the case of the low E, for instance). Is this even far enough off to bother messing with?

I'd say yes. It's probably not going to be an extremely noticeable difference, but you might as well get it as close as you can since it's not that hard to do.
#4
DOn't even think of trying to intonate the guitar with used strings.
Moving on.....
#5
Well, I did it (month-old 'used' strings and all). It's not perfect, but the open and 12th fret notes are much closer now according to my tuner. I was getting worried because the bridge saddle on the low E was getting pretty close to maxed out.

It might be psychological, but the guitar seems to 'ring out' nicer!
#6
yea, depending on where the bridge was installed and the thickness of the strings there sometimes won't be quite enough room to get it perfect. Having the intonation right mostly just makes things further up the neck sound more in tune, especially when mixing open strings with higher up playing.