#1
Hey guys,

I'm having trouble getting sustain out of my high notes on my electric guitars. I can hold the note for a second or two before the volume dramatically drops, and it just sounds kinda ugly. I've noticed this while using both clean and distorted tones. It seems lack of sustain can be a common issue for lower grade gear (I'm a novice, and a college student. I can't afford nor do I have the need for high end equipment). I'm just wondering if it's normal for notes to choke as I described and what I can do to remedy it.

My guitars:
  • Johnson JH-100 Delta Rose
  • Ibanez AR320


Amp:
Vox AD50VT
#2
Neck might need adjustments. Weather and string tension affect the neck in ways that can prevent the strings from ringing out. Look up guitar setup guides. Take it slow and ease yourself into it. It's quite easy.
Ibanez Prestige RG852MPB
Ibanez Prestige RG652KFX
ESP E-II M-1
LTD AW-7
Schecter Loomis NT
EVH 5150 III 50
PRS 212 DB
Line 6 POD HD500X
Deadhorse OD/Boss HM-2
#3
Probably either a high fret or the high side of your pickups is up too high.
#4
My guitar is doing this too. My problem is that I need a fret leveling. Maybe that's what yours needs
Originally posted by Joshua Garcia
I just come here to dick around.
And maybe occasionally wave my dick around.


My D is major
#5
Check if you have noise reduction/noise gate ON in your amp. Refer to your manual guide on how to do it.

Edit: nvm, I thought it was problem related to the amp.
Last edited by sybalez at Dec 25, 2015,
#6
Quote by jwmcdaniel97
My guitar is doing this too. My problem is that I need a fret leveling. Maybe that's what yours needs


^

Do those high notes buzz and then die? Or are they ringing cleanly and clearly and just sounding like crap? If they're buzzing and dying, or if you can play them cleanly and then they die when you try to bend them or play them with vibrato, you may need to raise the action or you might have a fret or two that needs leveling.

On the other hand, if the notes ring cleanly and clearly but only for a short while that's normal for notes in frets 20 and up (or so). It's just physics; there's much less mass in the portion of the string vibrating - because it's super short at the top - so its inertia is also much lower, meaning it's momentum dissipates much more quickly than does a note played lower on the same string. You can add mass to that situation by playing with a heavier gauge string, but to me it's not worth the playability trade off.

I've always thought frets 20 and above sound pretty bad. Some guitarists double-track notes in those registeres to thicken them up in studio. It's just a shrill, thin tone up there that's not particularly easy to fix; crank the bass to fatten them up and suddenly your tone on the wound strings is useless, and so on with the various other ways people try to get around this issue.
#7
I would check your pickup height.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#8
Thanks for all the answers.

Quote by lumberjack
^

Do those high notes buzz and then die? Or are they ringing cleanly and clearly and just sounding like crap? If they're buzzing and dying, or if you can play them cleanly and then they die when you try to bend them or play them with vibrato, you may need to raise the action or you might have a fret or two that needs leveling.

On the other hand, if the notes ring cleanly and clearly but only for a short while that's normal for notes in frets 20 and up (or so). It's just physics; there's much less mass in the portion of the string vibrating - because it's super short at the top - so its inertia is also much lower, meaning it's momentum dissipates much more quickly than does a note played lower on the same string. You can add mass to that situation by playing with a heavier gauge string, but to me it's not worth the playability trade off.

I've always thought frets 20 and above sound pretty bad. Some guitarists double-track notes in those registeres to thicken them up in studio. It's just a shrill, thin tone up there that's not particularly easy to fix; crank the bass to fatten them up and suddenly your tone on the wound strings is useless, and so on with the various other ways people try to get around this issue.


Makes sense. But how do these guys solo so well on stage? Is it the mere fact that they have top-of-the-line guitars, or maybe a component in their rig that's keeping the sound alive?

While I'm at it, I should probably also mention that I sometimes hear a "wavering" or "oscillating" sort of effect from the amp when I'm not playing. If I have the gain set high, it doesn't just produce a flat "hum". I did a little looking around on that issue and it was suggested that the pickups could need some adjusting, so I'm thinking the two "bugs" might be related
#9
Quote by khawk94
Thanks for all the answers.
1 - Makes sense. But how do these guys solo so well on stage? Is it the mere fact that they have top-of-the-line guitars, or maybe a component in their rig that's keeping the sound alive?

2 - While I'm at it, I should probably also mention that I sometimes hear a "wavering" or "oscillating" sort of effect from the amp when I'm not playing. If I have the gain set high, it doesn't just produce a flat "hum". I did a little looking around on that issue and it was suggested that the pickups could need some adjusting, so I'm thinking the two "bugs" might be related


1 - Besides the very good equipment they might have and well set up guitars, they have the most important factor of all: good technique.

2 - If you touch the strings, is that noise gone? If yes, it is a grounding/shielding issue on your guitar.

Combine high gain with that, and the noise gets worse. A noise gate is very very helpful for high gain situations.
Last edited by DanyFS at Dec 30, 2015,
#10
Quote by DanyFS
1 - Besides the very good equipment they might have and well set up guitars, they have the most important factor of all: good technique.

2 - If you touch the strings, is that noise gone? If yes, it is a grounding/shielding issue on your guitar.

Combine high gain with that, and the noise gets worse. A noise gate is very very helpful for high gain situations.


Sorry for the late reply, but after more toying I've found that standing at different angles and positions around the room causes a variance in the noise. I think I've read about this somewhere, like interference from external sources or something.
#11
Quote by khawk94
Sorry for the late reply, but after more toying I've found that standing at different angles and positions around the room causes a variance in the noise. I think I've read about this somewhere, like interference from external sources or something.


How noisy is your room? Do you have any fluorescent lights on it?
#12
Quote by khawk94
Thanks for all the answers.


Makes sense. But how do these guys solo so well on stage? Is it the mere fact that they have top-of-the-line guitars, or maybe a component in their rig that's keeping the sound alive?

While I'm at it, I should probably also mention that I sometimes hear a "wavering" or "oscillating" sort of effect from the amp when I'm not playing. If I have the gain set high, it doesn't just produce a flat "hum". I did a little looking around on that issue and it was suggested that the pickups could need some adjusting, so I'm thinking the two "bugs" might be related


From what I know, some guitarists from bands I listen to (such as Synyster Gates from A7X) have a Sustaniac Pickup on the neck pickup spot on their guitars