#1
I'm buying my second guitar real soon. And a thing that's bother me so much is the neck. there is a lot of guitar in my price range and there is two different necks
The set-neck
The bolt-on neck
i just created this thread just because of i want to know the different between the two necks
This is my choices of guitars
The Set-neck
-Schecter C-1 Platinum
-Schecter Damian Platinum
The Bolt-on
-Schecter Damian Elite/Damian Avenger Elite
-Schecter Banshee
(Basicly i wanted a Schecter with EMGs in it)
So thank you!
#2
There are more important things to worry about than whether or not a guitar is a set neck or a bolt-on, such as if the neck is actually comfortable to play for you. But I'll answer the question anyway.

Bolt-on neck guitars are ones where the body and neck are attached with screws. Set-neck guitars have their necks glued into the body. It's essentially as simple as that.

It's cheaper to manufacture guitars with bolt-on necks because there's no drying time required to attach the neck and the body together. But it is absolutely by no means a 'worse' way to build a guitar. It gives you the advantage that if the neck angle needs to be adjusted, then the neck can very easily be detached from the body, and the neck pocket can be shimmed so that the angle of the neck relative to the body can be changed whenever it needs it.

You can also replace the guitar's neck if it breaks. It's often difficult to find replacement necks that directly retrofit a guitar as there's no standardisation between brands on neck pocket dimensions, which are necessary to perfectly match to your new neck for the guitar to be playable. But at least the option is sometimes there if the guitar you have is a very popular one. With set neck and neck-through guitars, if the neck is damaged beyond repair, the guitar is useless and is to be thrown in the fireplace. But this isn't usually the case if a neck gets damaged in some way that repairing it isn't cost-prohibitive.

There's also some debate that set neck guitars have better upper fret access, but isn't the case with a lot of guitars. It completely depends on how the specific guitar's neck heel is designed. Some set neck guitars have very boxy heels that aren't at all comfortable to use while others transition into the body completely seamlessly. The same is the case with bolt-on necks.

Some people say that set-necks have better sustain than bolt-ons but again I don't buy that at all. It depends too much on how well the neck and the body are actually mated together and in terms of vibration transfer, no generalisations can really be made. A shitty set-neck joint is always going to have worse vibration transfer than a bolt-on neck done properly and vice versa.
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#4
Neither is superior for most uses. You can spend a few grand on a ibanez j-custom and have a bolt on neck, you could also spend a few grand on a gibson and have a set neck, and you can spend big bucks on a mayones and have a neck thru.

I personally wouldn't factor it in your purchase, there are a lot of other things that matter more.
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#5
http://www.cycfi.com/2013/11/sustain-myth-science/

I also saw a video where they strummed different guitars with different kind of necks and bolt on necks always had the best sustain (can't find it any more). So set neck having better sustain than bolt on necks? I think that's a myth.

Even Wikipedia lists "more resonance and sustain" as an advantage of bolt on necks.


Yeah, bolt on necks may not have as good upper fret access, but some companies handle that better than others. When people think of a bolt on neck, they usually think of a Strat, and Strat is not known for its high fret access. But it's all about the neck heel. You can do it well and you can do it badly. Fender just hasn't improved their old design.

Then again, Les Paul is not known for upper fret access either and it has a set neck.

Neck thru potentially has the best high fret access but that doesn't mean other kind of neck joints can't have good high fret access. It's all about how well it's designed (or if it was even considered when designing the guitar - like in case of Les Paul and Strat I doubt they even thought of high fret access).


I would say bolt on has most advantages. It's usually regarded as cheap (in a bad way) (because cheap guitars usually have bolt on necks) but that doesn't mean it's bad. It's the same as basswood that is often used in cheaper guitars. Just because it's cheap doesn't mean it's bad.


But yeah, when buying a guitar, the neck joint type wouldn't be a deal breaker or maker. It's more about how the guitar feels. Just play all of those guitars and buy the one that feels best.
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#6
Quote by MaggaraMarine
http://www.cycfi.com/2013/11/sustain-myth-science/

I also saw a video where they strummed different guitars with different kind of necks and bolt on necks always had the best sustain (can't find it any more). So set neck having better sustain than bolt on necks? I think that's a myth.

Even Wikipedia lists "more resonance and sustain" as an advantage of bolt on necks.


Yeah, bolt on necks may not have as good upper fret access, but some companies handle that better than others. When people think of a bolt on neck, they usually think of a Strat, and Strat is not known for its high fret access. But it's all about the neck heel. You can do it well and you can do it badly. Fender just hasn't improved their old design.

Then again, Les Paul is not known for upper fret access either and it has a set neck.

Neck thru potentially has the best high fret access but that doesn't mean other kind of neck joints can't have good high fret access. It's all about how well it's designed (or if it was even considered when designing the guitar - like in case of Les Paul and Strat I doubt they even thought of high fret access).


I would say bolt on has most advantages. It's usually regarded as cheap (in a bad way) (because cheap guitars usually have bolt on necks) but that doesn't mean it's bad. It's the same as basswood that is often used in cheaper guitars. Just because it's cheap doesn't mean it's bad.


But yeah, when buying a guitar, the neck joint type wouldn't be a deal breaker or maker. It's more about how the guitar feels. Just play all of those guitars and buy the one that feels best.


I remember that too and couldn't find it either I didn't want to say it without something to back it up.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/