#1
Hi.

Just wondered if anyone has any experience of this combination and how you find it size wise in relation to more conventional arrangements.

I picked up my Les Paul the other day after playing on my 24 fret 25.5 Ibanez for months. I was loving the high fret access and Floyd Rose (Edge) on the Ibanez but my bending notes obviously just reached crazy (in a good way) heights when going back to the shorter scale of the Les Paul.

I'm keen to hear any experience people have had with the comfort/discomfort of 24 frets in a 24.75.

My own hands are average to slightly below average in finger length,fairly thick and clubby palms and fingers and very slightly above average in width from first thumb joint to outer palm. nothing unusually large or small.

Does this type of scale feel noticably different to you,if so,in what way?

Any other issues you've come across with this set up?
Last edited by guitar-name at Dec 25, 2015,
#2
The only guitar I know of combining a 24 fret neck with a 24.75" scale is the discontinued Godin SD aka Godin SD 24- a LP shaped guitar with a HSS pickup configuration and a 5 way switch. Essentially, a Strat in Les Paul clothing. They were discontinued some time ago, but Godin does like to try interesting combos. I wouldn't be surprised to find that there were other models in their line that had the similar combo of specs.

I want to get one, and they're cheap online, but I haven't seen one in person to try out, so I can't speak to any oddities or issues.
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#3
Hi Danny.

I'm currently drooling over the LTD EC 331FR.

Les Paul shape cut for easy access to 24 frets,24.75 scale and the much feared and reviled Floyd Rose on Les Paul shaped guitar (A whole other can of worms)

Can't find one to try but looks like it might be a great hybrid.


EDIT: I just had a look at that Godin, looks very Stratty to me with the maple and six in line machineheads. I'm in one of my "fallen out with Strats" cycles at the moment.
Last edited by guitar-name at Dec 25, 2015,
#4
My Warlock is 24.625 scale with 24 frets and FR. The scale length makes no noticeable difference because they used thinner frets so that actually opens up more space for my fingers than those obnoxious super mega jumbo frets on a 25.5.
#6
I had a LTD EC1000 that had 24.75 and 24 frets. It was a great guitar but I hated the neck pup position. I wished it had only 22 frets and sold it.
Will buy another LTD or ESP at some point but will make sure it's got 22.
#7
I have several 24.75" 24-fret guitars. Two are older Carvin DC150s (small-bodied double cutaway neck-through guitars), and there are a couple of DC-145 Carvins. I've also got an Agile AL2000 Floyd, which is a 24-fret 24.75" guitar. The bridge and bridge pickup are moved about 3/4" closer to the neck pickup and the neck is about 3/4" longer to maintain the scale. The 24th fret is thus in the same spot as where the 22nd fret would normally be. It features a "tilted" neck/body join that works almost as well as my Gibson Axcess for upper fret comfort.

There's also an old ('92) Samick Artist Edition double cut that has a 24.75" scale with 24 frets and an HSS pickup configuration. And three Moonstones and...

Truth is, most of my guitars are 24-fret (though a couple are 25" scale and two newer ones are 25.5" scale and there's a 27" scale tossed in there).

I really don't have any issues with the neck pickup placement.
#8
Interesting.

So did you get into these guitars because of consciously feeling better about your bending on 24.75 or did you just fall into it and stick with it?
#9
Quote by guitar-name
Interesting.

So did you get into these guitars because of consciously feeling better about your bending on 24.75 or did you just fall into it and stick with it?


My first guitars were Gibson ES-335s, and I've got a lot of Gibsons that are done in that scale. In fact, *most* of my guitars are either 24.75" or 25" scale, and it had nothing to do with bending. So, yes, fell into it and stuck with it.

However.

One of my Carvins (a DC145) was built with a 25.5" scale in the one and only year ('91) that Carvin built neck-throughs in that scale. It's a 22-fret guitar, but plays great, and I have no issues bending. Two of my most recent guitar purchases are a pair of Variax JTV-89Fs, and they're 25.5" scale and 24-fret necks. Bending on those is a LOT different from bending on a shorter-scale hardtail because the Floyd tends to raise its butt and defeat your bending.
#10
Quote by dspellman
Bending on those is a LOT different from bending on a shorter-scale hardtail because the Floyd tends to raise its butt and defeat your bending.


^

Bending strings on a hardtail will always feel better to me (subjective), and it certainly takes less effort (objective).

That said, I've played and owned a few 24 fret 24.75" scale guitars, and yes all else being equal (strings/bridges/trems) it's easier to bend with them, and play wider vibrato, etc. compared to the 25.5" scale. You *can* run into space issues in the 20+ fret territory, but that depends so much on how wide the frets themselves are. Also, I can't say that I play past the 20th fret very often anymore. Years ago I built a 27 fret guitar and used especially narrow wire from 20 to 27; there was definitely space to play on all the frets. It didn't matter though, because the notes just don't sound that good up there, especially if you're playing from the bridge pickup or a neck pickup that's further back because of the extended fretboard issues.

I like the looser/warmer sound of the 24.75" for some things, and miss the snappy tightness of 25.5" for others. Solution = have both. Or if you can't afford it keep the scale around you benefit from and/or enjoy the most.
Last edited by lumberjack at Dec 28, 2015,
#11
the LTD EC range have 24 frets and 24.5/24.75" scale

The Gibson Buckethead studio also has 24 frets
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#13
Quote by lumberjack
^

Bending strings on a hardtail will always feel better to me (subjective), and it certainly takes less effort (objective).

That said, I've played and owned a few 24 fret 24.75" scale guitars, and yes all else being equal (strings/bridges/trems) it's easier to bend with them, and play wider vibrato, etc. compared to the 25.5" scale. You *can* run into space issues in the 20+ fret territory, but that depends so much on how wide the frets themselves are. Also, I can't say that I play past the 20th fret very often anymore. Years ago I built a 27 fret guitar and used especially narrow wire from 20 to 27; there was definitely space to play on all the frets. It didn't matter though, because the notes just don't sound that good up there, especially if you're playing from the bridge pickup or a neck pickup that's further back because of the extended fretboard issues.

I like the looser/warmer sound of the 24.75" for some things, and miss the snappy tightness of 25.5" for others. Solution = have both. Or if you can't afford it keep the scale around you benefit from and/or enjoy the most.


Now that IS interesting about the Floyd in particular or trem in general affecting bending. I have an old cheap Ibanez GRG170DX with a 25.5 scale and the "FAT 10" floating bridge was so bad for tuning that I stuck 5 springs in it,tightened it up and made it pretty much a hardtail. I must say that it plays a lot better on wide bends for me than an almost identical neck to the mm, on my set neck (RGT42) which has a Floyd/Edge trem. Trouble is I can't remember whether it was as fluid before I sort of hard tailed it. I always seem to remember it being easier to bend than the 4 Floyd guitars I've had even before I blocked it.

EDIT: Apologies to dspellman,this reply was also partly for you,who I believe raised the Floyd issue.
Last edited by guitar-name at Dec 29, 2015,
#14
Some folks with Floyds develop techniques to get the bend going before the Floyd's springs realize it's happening (I have NO idea how to describe that in a way that makes better sense), and others subtly palm the back of the floyd to counter its tendency to lift. A lot of players do this without realizing it, actually.

Heavier springs are certainly one way to handle it, though it means you have to manhandle the trem when you want to use it. Not a lot of "flutter" with those. Not a lot of response when you want to do something subtle with your little finger.

One caution with the heavy spring method, however. Some guitars have the bridge pickup rather close to the trem. The issue here is that there's very little wood "wall thickness" between the trem's studs and the pickup, and a number of guitars have had to have been repaired in a major way because the trem's supports crashed into the pickup cavity.
#15
Quote by guitar-name
Yes the EC is something I've had my eye on. Looks great.


If you're in the uk guitarguitar have a cracking offer on gold ec1000s at the mo.