#1
How important do you guys think theory is?
I mean i really doubt Tommy Iommi a very poor man from Birmingham 1970 knew intervalls when he recorded paranoid whitch was a succses?
Last edited by Maxfalk at Dec 26, 2015,
#2
Essential.

Without any kind of music theory being established, nobody would be able to play with one another as a band or be able to communicate musical ideas. Everybody who tries to play in a band, tries to play by the rules established by music theory, even if they'd shrug their shoulders if you asked them anything about the subject. They're merely going off intuition, rather than off the name of a scale, key, time signature etc. and not knowing why it's a scale that works mathematically in the context of a piece of music other than "it just sounds good." I guess it depends on how you define "music theory."
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Dec 26, 2015,
#3
Depends what you mean by 'theory'. Iommi may not have been able to give the 'proper' names for the chords he used, but he employed them in a way which worked, for what he was trying to achieve.

He - and the rest of Sabbath - knew enough about music to communicate their ideas with each other, and produce successful records.
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#4
But how do you know when your ready to be in a amature band?
What knowledge is absolutely required?
#5
Quote by Maxfalk
But how do you know when your ready to be in a amature band?
What knowledge is absolutely required?

Playing in time. Playing stuff that doesn't sound like ear rape(unless you're joining an earrapecore band).
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#6
If you can play a few songs and can find some players who play near your level of playing skill, you're ready. There is no minimum requirement and you'll be amazed at how much faster you will learn to play and you'll have a reason for learning. You'll share things you learned with others and likewise learn from them and you'll see what works and what doesn't work. The first band I formed with a few friends was put together before we actually played well enough to be a band (if that makes any sense). We wanted to be in band even more than we wanted to play well but we learned from each other and we advanced as players so much faster because of it.

40 years ago I started out just wanting to be in a band. I would have played any instrument to be in a band and perform. That was my original goal. After a few years I became hooked on playing guitar and wanted to be better so I could join a better band. It's the reason I took a lot of shortcuts learning to play but now I am passionate about learning to play correctly but I don't regret any of it. Playing in a band with other musicians is the best part of all of it for me personally.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Dec 26, 2015,
#7
Quote by Rickholly74
If you can play a few songs and can find some players who play near your level of playing skill, you're ready. There is no minimum requirement you'll be amazed at how much faster you will learn to play and you'll have a reason for learning. You'll share things you leraned with others and likewise learn from them. The first band I formed with a few friends was put together before we actually played well enough to be a band (if that makes any sense). We wanted to be in band even more than we wanted to play well but we learned from each other and we advanced as players so much faster because of it.

40 years ago I started out just wanting to be in a band. I would have played any instrument to be in a band and perform. That was my original goal. After a few years I became hooked on playing guitar and wanted to be better so I could join a better band. It's the reason I took a lot of shortcuts learning to play. I am now passionate about learning to play correctly.



This is my knowledge right now

1. I can calculate the name of any string and fret.

2. Im famillar with intervalls but i wouldn't say i know them

3. I know the pentagonic scale and the major scale.

4. I can play famous riffs from, (some better than others)
Master of puppets
Welcome home
This means war
No more teras
Paranoid (whole solo also)
Iron man
Rose of sharyn
Seek and destroy
Crazy train
Aces high
Ich tu dir weh
Kickstart my heart
Rock you like a hurricane
Come as you are
Breaking the law
Cirice
Electric funeral
Heaven and hell
Raining blood
Symphony of destruction
Chop suey
Ace of spades
war pigs
#8
That's a good start but don't just learn the riff's, learn the whole song. All the chords and parts from beginning to end. You need to know at least a few complete songs not just pieces of a lot of songs. Keep at it.
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#9
It depends for what sort of thing you're doing. The art aspect of guitar always comes from the mind, not from theory. Theory teaches you where the sounds are, so that you can access them.

If you're a cook, you could make some good food knowing very little, and you would use your knowledge and taste to design them, but if you go and research other cultures and learn new foods new flavours and new techniques, you will have more to work with to design your new foods.

Theory can be a bit like that, also.

Other than that, on guitar, to me, it is essentially just a way to know the fretboard. The better you know it, the more free you are. You can take a number of approaches, some simple ones, only pentatonic, only chords and embellishments, whatever, and that's fine, you can make good music that way. You can just learn licks and recognize patterns like that as well.

But if you understand how music fits together, and you've named sounds, and practiced lots of patterns, and internalized them, and develop a high level of dexterity to play them, as you learn them, then you will be much more powerful of a musician. But at the end of the day, if you want to write poetry, the size of your vocabulary doesn't really make much of a difference. It always comes down to what you actually say.

But still, to learn more on guitar is to increase your potential to be able to say interesting things. But it is not algorithms or directions on how to say interesting things.
#10
Depends on what you aim is. If you just want to play someone else's songs well in your living room, then I guess theory doesn't factor in. If you want to compose songs, you'll need some theory--or great talent to make up for the lack of theory. But if you want your songs to be played by your band, you'll need theory--what's the other guitar player going to play, the bassist, etc.

My problem with how theory is often taught (in rock/metal especially) is that it seems to be geared mainly toward solos. As if a 30 second solo is the essence of a 5 minute song. Some may think that, I don't, not even from a guitar player's perspective.
Last edited by dthmtl3 at Dec 26, 2015,
#11
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Depends what you mean by 'theory'. Iommi may not have been able to give the 'proper' names for the chords he used, but he employed them in a way which worked, for what he was trying to achieve.

He - and the rest of Sabbath - knew enough about music to communicate their ideas with each other, and produce successful records.

Apart from anything else, Iommi had solid blues chops - he would certainly be aware of how basic chords and scales work relative to each other and in a key; whether he was using terms like "dominant" or "diminished" or not.

Every guitarist who produced the riffs on that list would have a foundation in earlier music and their own experiences with other bands that would provide them with a firm precedent - or at least a context - for everything they did and experimented with.

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-snip-

This is pretty much on the money. Theory is descriptive, not proscriptive, and it will only increase your ability to make music sound how you want it to. People who fear for their "feeling" getting taken away by knowing theory sound a bit like those New Guinean tribes who believe(d) that taking a photo of someone steals their soul.

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These are also good points.
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Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Dec 26, 2015,
#12
Amen to what dthmtl3 said. A large portion of what is posted often has to do with solo's and scales. When you play with other musicians a solo is just a small part of the song and you may not actually be the person playing the solo on a particular song. I enjoy playing rhythm guitar behind another guitar player, keyboard or other instrument. A really good rhythm player is essential to any band and is too often overlooked.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Dec 26, 2015,
#13
I've moved several of your threads to the Guitar Techniques section. Please post correctly. I won't move any more.