#1
Yo, I've just got this HM Strat and it's my first guitar w/ a locking tremolo. I'm waaay out of my depth. I play exclusively in Eb tuning, and until I get this S.O.B a half step down I can't really use it for what I intend to use it. It has a 'Kahler Spyder' tremolo, and I can't find anything explaining any real information about it, and I'm really not up for messing it up. So if someone with actual knowledge of it could help that'd be great. Pics included below. (sorry for the quality)



thanks.
#2
Kahler Spyder bridges are very similar to the Floyd Rose Speedloader bridges and you set them up pretty much exactly the same way. The only difference between it and any other type of Floyd is that the ball ends of the strings are fed through the back of the bridge rather than the strings being fed from the top.

Googling 'how to set up a Floyd Rose' and watching a bunch of videos will give you all the answers you need. There are hundreds of videos out there and they all explain essentially the same thing.
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#4
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Kahler Spyder bridges are very similar to the Floyd Rose Speedloader bridges and you set them up pretty much exactly the same way. The only difference between it and any other type of Floyd is that the ball ends of the strings are fed through the back of the bridge rather than the strings being fed from the top.

Googling 'how to set up a Floyd Rose' and watching a bunch of videos will give you all the answers you need. There are hundreds of videos out there and they all explain essentially the same thing.


No, they are licensed floyd rose bridges. The ball ends don't go through the bridge like the FR speedloader. You set them up exactly how you would a floyd.

OP, you just need to adjust the spring claw to balance the bridge to Eb. Be careful with the bolts, I swear Kahler used some sort of swiss cheese alloy for all their parts on the spidyr. I retired my HM strat because it was too hard to find parts for the bridge.
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#5
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No, they are licensed floyd rose bridges. The ball ends don't go through the bridge like the FR speedloader. You set them up exactly how you would a floyd.

OP, you just need to adjust the spring claw to balance the bridge to Eb. Be careful with the bolts, I swear Kahler used some sort of swiss cheese alloy for all their parts on the spidyr. I retired my HM strat because it was too hard to find parts for the bridge.


Alright, how do I know I've adjusted the springs correctly? I really don't want to mess it up. I feel like I'm constantly walking on eggshells with the whole locking tremolo thing, I don't want to find out that I've royally fucked up my guitar in a couple of years because I set something badly.
Last edited by Reconified at Dec 27, 2015,
#6
I've never set up a Khaler locking bridge, but I own a guitar with Takeuchi Licensed Floyd Rose (made in Japan) and I set mine to floating (which is a pain) being my only FR, I set one of my Strats to floating as well.. First things first, what guage strings are you using? 9-42 or 10-46 doesn't matter which brand you choose, I am assuming when you got the guitar the setup was fine, but you swapped the strings and now the action is affected. If you went heavy tension strings 10's quarter turn clockwise on trem claw screw (do it slowly).. If the original strings were 10's or 11's and you went 9's loosen the trem claw screws quater turn counter clockwise. Once you get the guitar near the pitch, use fine turners to tune correctly. Hope that was clear explanation.. Also get a small piece of cardboard or buy a tool that prevents the bridge from dive bomb into the cavity (shredneck trem block) works nicely and makes string change less a pain.
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#7
I actually haven't changed the strings, so I'm not too sure about the gauge. I just don't have much of an understanding about the tremolo. The setup is pretty much the same as before I messed with it, I think, but I need to know how I have to compensate to make sure everything's fine when I'm tuned down to Eb.
#8
Quote by Reconified
Alright, how do I know I've adjusted the springs correctly? I really don't want to mess it up. I feel like I'm constantly walking on eggshells with the whole locking tremolo thing, I don't want to find out that I've royally fucked up my guitar in a couple of years because I set something badly.


It's the claw that you need to change. As in how far the screws holding it go into the guitar. Check out the sticky on how to setup a FR. Under tuning, part 4. Using the same string gauge but tuning down to Eb, the trem will tilt back. To level it, you will need to do a turn or two to back out the claw screws.

Another way to handle it would be to slightly increase the string gauge to compensate for the lower tuning. If it were strung with 10s for standard, try something like the skinny top heavy bottoms for Eb.
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#9
Could you by any chance find a reference picture for how level the tremolo should be? Like I said, this is pretty much my dream guitar, and I really don't want to take any chances that might mess it up without being 100% sure of what I'm doing.
#10
Quote by Reconified
Could you by any chance find a reference picture for how level the tremolo should be? Like I said, this is pretty much my dream guitar, and I really don't want to take any chances that might mess it up without being 100% sure of what I'm doing.


It should be parallel with the body of the guitar. Like this: http://www.premierguitar.com/ext/resources/archives/1eadde52-5518-44f0-bdb5-853ceb6c251d.JPG

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-haXWdjhiDfw/UNAaqoOY8FI/AAAAAAAAD4M/3aKWur-UAFU/s1600/DSCF7721.JPG

If I were you, I would change the strings if they aren't new. Setting up a double locking bridge (or any other bridge for that matter) with old strings is a huge waste of time. Always do a setup with fresh strings.

After that, buy the same gauge and same brand, keep the same tuning and you won't need to set it up again. Unless of course you want to change the gauge, brand and tuning for whatever reason, then you would have to set up the whole thing again.
Last edited by DanyFS at Dec 27, 2015,
#11
The guy had put a new set on just before I bought it, so it'd feel like a waste if I were to swap them out immediately, especially since I don't have a lot of strings with me right now. Also, when I first got the guitar the tremolo was at angled toward the neck.

Anyway, I've started making the tremolo parallel with the guitar, but the screws are really deep in there, is that okay?


Last edited by Reconified at Dec 27, 2015,
#12
Look -- pull up a bunch of the YouTube videos that deal with changing strings on a Floyd. You're not actually going to be changing the strings, but you do want to loosen them (and be sure to loosen the screws on the locking nut or string lock) before you start cranking down on the claw. Otherwise you'll start breaking things (beginning with the strings).

Once you've got everything loosened up, make sure your fine-tuning adjusters on the trem itself are screwed OUT about 2/3rds of the way. Except for the first time you tighten the locking nut (at the end of this procedure), 90% of the adjusting you'll do will be to correct for strings being flat, and that will require you to screw those fine tuners IN. That's why you don't set them up half-way screwed out, but cheat a bit further out.

The Floyd operates on a very simple principle; string tension is balanced by spring tension. Once you get the butt end flattened out parallel to the top of the guitar, keep the trem in place by inserting a stack of post-its, a stack of picks, a chunk of wood, etc. between the body of the guitar and the bottom of the sustain block in the spring cavity. This will keep the butt end of the trem from lifting. Now tune the guitar to Eb. That stack of post-its, if it's done its job, will have kept the butt end from hiking up in the air. NOW the idea is to tighten those screws on the claw until those post-its want to fall out (you'll probably notice the tune on the guitar going a bit higher as well). At that point, pull the post-its and check the basic tune of the guitar. If it's gone a bit sharp, you can loosen the claw screws *slightly* and the rear end of the trem should stay pretty much in place and the tune should be near bang-on. Now you can do a fine tuning with the keys on the headstock. The butt end of the Floyd should still be parallel to the top of the guitar. Lock down the lock nut. That will often pull the strings sharp a bit. Use the fine tuners on the trem to bring it into good tune.
#13
If you need help with a Kahler Spyder (parts, instruction, etc.), your best source is wammiworld.com