#1
So Ive struggled with sweeping arpeggios for years now. I initially didn't really understand that it is something that takes time and you start very slowly. This led to bad habits.

Anyway, now I'm really trying to learn this technique and and I'm just doing 3 string major and minor shapes. I guess the most common ones. No finger rolling ones. My question is how exactly should i go about increasing the tempo? Right now I'm doing them at 40 bpm playing one note per click. I'm practicing different places on the neck trying to really nail each note cleanly. Should I take one arpeggio and gradually increase the tempo? And should I start at the same tempo every time I practice? Like if I got up to 60 bpm one day, do I start back at 40 the next day or start at 60?
#2
you need to practice everything evenly and at the same speed, or you may bottleneck yourself in one area but be better in another. you need to be fast with all of the arpeggios you are trying to practice. what ive learned from practicing alternate picking at high speeds (200 bpm 16ths) is when you start slow and steadily build up the bpm and become comfortable at that speed (or multiple speeds) is when you should up the tempo.

another thing you should do that got me great results is when you are already warmed up, jack up the tempo to a speed that is beyond the level that you can play every note clearly and try that for like 5 minutes. it will make the previous speed you were playing at much easier. if you keep doing this eventually you will get used to that higher speed very quickly which will allow you to move onto an even higher one
Last edited by sourcegamer101 at Dec 27, 2015,
#3
+1 ... pushing yourself briefly is a good idea fror scales, and fast picking ... but I wouldn't recommend that for sweep picking. You really need to nail the control.

Make sure the sweep really is a sweep, and not separate movements. Also check if your picking hand/forearm is sticking at all, even ever so slightly, on the guitar body ... that can wreck the timing. One way to assess this is use a long sleeve top, and pull sleeve into your your palm and hold in place with your 4th (maybe also 3rd) finger ... this will remove any friction. This is not the solution, but it will show if that's an issue for you.

Once you're sure the motion is smooth, and feels easy and sounds in time, then crank the tempo (at most to where you lose your timing, and then back off from that, but note what that tempo is, as a target).
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Dec 27, 2015,
#4
Thanks for the replies. I've been practicing both hands separately, still at 40 bpm, and I seem to be making some progress.

Also. I should be focusing on the change of direction too right? With the upstroke on the G string followed by a downstroke on the B string?
#5
3 String Arpeqqios are not very good practice for beginners, you are doing very little sweeping and a lot of direction change at bottom and top.
I suggest easy 5 string arpeggios for the beginning. If you have been trying for years now the way you are doing it now, try a different approach: Adding notes at midtempo instead of doing the whole arpeggio slow, and forget the metronome for now.
Start with the first 3 notes, if you have that down add the 4th and so on. That way you are doing the eventual sweeping motion right away.
You can't slow down indefinitely and still expect the same interaction between pick and string.
Last edited by Facecut at Dec 30, 2015,
#6
Quote by Facecut
3 String Arpeqqios are not very good practice for beginners, you are doing very little sweeping and a lot of direction change at bottom and top.
I suggest easy 5 string arpeggios for the beginning. If you have been trying for years now the way you are doing it now, try a different approach: Adding notes at midtempo instead of doing the whole arpeggio slow, and forget the metronome for now.
Start with the first 3 notes, if you have that down add the 4th and so on. That way you are doing the eventual sweeping motion right away.
You can't slow down indefinitely and still expect the same interaction between pick and string.

What exactly do you mean adding notes midtempo?
#7
Do a rhythm ladder.

Start with quarters, then 8ths, triplets, 16ths, and then sextuplets if you can. Do the same arpeggios with each rhythm.

When you're working up a technique, it's a good idea to do multiple tempos. Do the above rhythm ladder at your base tempo, then increase to say 48bpm and find which rhythm trips you up, then 56bpm, etc until you find where quarter notes are as fast as you can go. Once you've done practice at all of the tempos and rhythms that you can with clean tone and accuracy, push the metronome a bit and push your limit for just a minute. Cease when you start making mistakes, else you'll just be practicing mistakes.
#8
Quote by SaturationPoint
What exactly do you mean adding notes midtempo?


Start with the first 3 notes of the arpeggio. Repeat them at midtempo until they are perfectly seperated, good tone, no ringing strings, solid muting, minimal unwanted noise, then add the 4th note and repeat until perfect and so on until you are doing the whole arpeggio.
#9
3 String Arpeqqios are not very good practice for beginners, you are doing very little sweeping and a lot of direction change at bottom and top.
I suggest easy 5 string arpeggios for the beginning. If you have been trying for years now the way you are doing it now, try a different approach: Adding notes at midtempo instead of doing the whole arpeggio slow, and forget the metronome for now.
Start with the first 3 notes, if you have that down add the 4th and so on. That way you are doing the eventual sweeping motion right away.
You can't slow down indefinitely and still expect the same interaction between pick and string.

Do a rhythm ladder.

Start with quarters, then 8ths, triplets, 16ths, and then sextuplets if you can. Do the same arpeggios with each rhythm.

When you're working up a technique, it's a good idea to do multiple tempos. Do the above rhythm ladder at your base tempo, then increase to say 48bpm and find which rhythm trips you up, then 56bpm, etc until you find where quarter notes are as fast as you can go. Once you've done practice at all of the tempos and rhythms that you can with clean tone and accuracy, push the metronome a bit and push your limit for just a minute. Cease when you start making mistakes, else you'll just be practicing mistakes.


I was just practicing this today. Did 3 strings for most of the time but then tried 5 strings. I could get up to sextuplets( 6 notes per beat right?) in a short amount of time at 40bpm. I was also adding the extra note on the A string to make the rhythm easier. I think possibly my biggest problem that's prevented me from making progress with sweeping is the G and B strings. This is exacerbated when playing 3 strings because of the direction change. But if 5 strings is easier, then shouldn't I do more 3 strings since thats my problem area?