#1
I'm a novice guitarist (been practicing for two weeks or so). This is the guitar I have:

http://i.imgur.com/w1twaLv.jpg

Whenever I try playing sitting down, it seems like the guitar body is too small to huddle into my body, it just doesn't stay stable and I end up having to support the neck with my fretting hand.

I feel like I'm the only one who finds it easier to play whilst standing. Is it a bad idea to just practice standing the whole time, seeing as I'm a beginner?
#2
do you keep it on your right leg (assuming you're right-handed)? do you have a strap on the guitar?

aside from that, unless you try out a lot of guitars in guitar shops it's probably better to find standing and playing easier than sitting. though i appreciate it would be annoying when it seems that everyone else can do it fine.
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#3
Quote by Dave_Mc
do you keep it on your right leg (assuming you're right-handed)? do you have a strap on the guitar?

aside from that, unless you try out a lot of guitars in guitar shops it's probably better to find standing and playing easier than sitting. though i appreciate it would be annoying when it seems that everyone else can do it fine.

Tried it on both legs, same thing happens.

Yeah it's only a problem for me because EVERYONE says they find it easier to sit down haha. However yeah I'm considering a different shape guitar might do the trick... hopefully.
#4
yeah. i mean personally i'd probably find a strat-style guitar the easiest style to sit with but since you don't then trying different shapes is probably the thing.

maybe yours is neck-heavy, too? strats normally aren't, but i guess that could explain the neck-dive you get.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#5
Using a strap is a pretty easy solution.... I use one on my semi-hollow to hold it in proper playing position.
#7
I'm with Bikewer, I find playing guitar while sitting is tough I use a strap that is adjusted to a sitting position. Without a strap supporting the guitar I am unconsciously holding up the neck. I play better standing but if I adjust the strap I'm OK sitting.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Dec 29, 2015,
#9
Quote by derek8520
Try bringing the bottom of the guitar closer to your body.

Yeah just tried that. Here's a new pic: https://i.imgur.com/6VYPFW7.jpg

Been told to try keep my forearm parallel to the strings, that's as best I can get it but now at least the whole arm rests on the guitar.

Only thing is now I have to look over the frets to see my fingers but I'm guessing that's normal at first.
#11
Quote by PapaRockett
Yeah just tried that. Here's a new pic: https://i.imgur.com/6VYPFW7.jpg

Been told to try keep my forearm parallel to the strings, that's as best I can get it but now at least the whole arm rests on the guitar.

Only thing is now I have to look over the frets to see my fingers but I'm guessing that's normal at first.



Do you know how to palm mute yet? The easiest way to describe how I hold my guitar is by saying my picking hand is pretty much always in the palm mute position. That allows the rest of my arm to just fall into a comfortable position without much thought.
#12
Quote by PapaRockett
Been told to try keep my forearm parallel to the strings

Who by? That sounds like bullshit to me.

Here are a couple relatively famous (and, more importantly, technically proficient) guitarists:



Both have their forearm at an angle.

Likewise, look at your guitar. On a Strat, the corner by your elbow is sloped. That contour's for your arm.

Have the guitar on your right leg, with the back resting against your body, your hand over the strings just by the bridge, and your forearm more or less resting on that sloped area. How's that?
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#13
try classical style with the guitar between your legs. this will position it like you were playing standing. been doing that for years and i'm a strat guy. not a hard guitar to balance at all.
#14
Quote by PapaRockett
I'm a novice guitarist (been practicing for two weeks or so). This is the guitar I have:

http://i.imgur.com/w1twaLv.jpg

Whenever I try playing sitting down, it seems like the guitar body is too small to huddle into my body, it just doesn't stay stable and I end up having to support the neck with my fretting hand.

I feel like I'm the only one who finds it easier to play whilst standing. Is it a bad idea to just practice standing the whole time, seeing as I'm a beginner?
You're honestly better off practicing with an acoustic if you're going to sit.

The string / neck center line to lower waist measurement is wider on an acoustic. Which has the effect of raising the strumming arc to the point where it would be if you were standing to play.

While I agree with Dave_MC about a Strat being an easy play sitting guitar, I think a Les Paul single cut is an approximate equal.

People have done a lot with electric "ergonomic" guitar designs, especially since Ovation issued their "Breadwinner" / "Deacon" designs.



Note the deep cut in the bottom of the guitar. That can be wrapped around your right leg while seated.

I would like to point out, I think it's easier to work on perfecting right hand technique while seated, while it's much easier to perfect your Townshend windmills while standing.

It becomes a question of priorities.....
#15
Sit in a low chair first things first. Slant the guitar so that from your perspective the neck is facing away from you and your whole forearm is hugging the body, and slant your legs left (your perspective) so that your hips can hug the guitar body. Raise your right leg so that it is standing tiptoe on the ground. Also hunch a bit more

This will give you more freedom for your left hand and less unwanted movement so the guitar body doesnt move around much.

Example video of me playing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HAuTABXl60s
#16
Quote by PapaRockett
Yeah just tried that. Here's a new pic: https://i.imgur.com/6VYPFW7.jpg

Been told to try keep my forearm parallel to the strings, that's as best I can get it but now at least the whole arm rests on the guitar.

Only thing is now I have to look over the frets to see my fingers but I'm guessing that's normal at first.



The parallel arm suggestion is not a good mechanically for you right arm (at least not for the majority of guitarists). Imagine you are putting your hand out to shake hands, and you fingers, hand and wrist are aligned with you forearm ... imagine a straight line from your elbow to the tip of your middle finger. WIth you hand / arm straight like that, rest your palm on the strings ... and adjust your forearm until your fingers are roughly at 45 degrees to the strings. This will make you move your elbow to be able to do that. Picking then comes from moving your wrist slightly either side of straight. String crossing comes from sliding your forearm.

As for seeing the frets ... depends what angle you have the guitar body (hence neck) held in. For me, when I'm sitting, (I use a Strat) ... I have the body around 10 degrees off vertical ... so I can see the frets enough if I need to.
#17
I also agree that the idea of having your arm parallel to the strings is misguided. I'm not sure I have ever seen it done that way but I really never looked for it. Guess I'll start looking to see someone who plays like that. In order to play like that it seems to me your guitar would have to be pretty high up on your chest.
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