#1
I picked up a cheap Joyo guitar pedal compressor a few months ago,which is great for what it is. It's pretty good as a light "boost" for a solo in say a Stonesy type song and adds a bit of "something" nice and ballsy and well voiced to 70's rock style distortions and it also tightens up a heavily distorted guitar quite nicely all round. What it won't do is that long compressed sustain thing,I can get sustain from the amp but it's a different vibe. With the comp on,I can get away with a ton less distortion.

Now there's a lot of "boutique" compressors around,costing upwards of a hundred quid that will give me a bigger squeeze,more interesting or authentic tone (arguably) etc... but I was wondering if it might be interesting to run a couple of these compressors into my amp,one after the other.....For the twenty quid I paid for it,there isn't a lot to lose really if it's a feasable idea.

If using "identical" compressors is a bad idea,how about two different cheapos?

Anyone ever tried it?
Last edited by guitar-name at Dec 29, 2015,
#2
I'm not sure what the point of two of them would be -- can you illustrate a bit better (for us dunderheads) what you think it will accomplish?

You might borrow a Multi-FX like a Pod from a friend and set it up with a pair of compressors inline (internally) to see what happens. If it works the way you think it will, then buy the extra foot pedal compressor and go for it.
#3
Quote by dspellman
I'm not sure what the point of two of them would be -- can you illustrate a bit better (for us dunderheads) what you think it will accomplish?

You might borrow a Multi-FX like a Pod from a friend and set it up with a pair of compressors inline (internally) to see what happens. If it works the way you think it will, then buy the extra foot pedal compressor and go for it.


Sure,I'll elaborate,though I'm not sure that it's you that's the dunderhead.

I was kind of viewing it in the sense of perhaps being a little bit like gain staging a couple of distortions or drives in sequence with less gain per unit than you would usually use, which can work well. I'm wondering if the attack speed and level controls on two units might have a synergistic effect that simply maxing out the one compressor won't give you. Studio recordings very often compress vocals numerous times instead of applying one great big squeeze. Vocals are obviously a different instrument and in an entirely different signal chain but I wonder if any of that logic applies.

I'll borrow another comp and experiment and let you know....Meanwhile any personal compressor anecdotes welcome.
Last edited by guitar-name at Dec 29, 2015,
#4
Vocals are often compressed in parallel -- you might try that rather than processing in series. A second track of the same vocals are given a different amount of compression and then blended back in with the first track, which may have a lighter compression, for example. Vocals are also subjected to a de-esser, which is essentially a compressor that's only compressing a specific range (say, around 7Khz). So you may want to consider EQ-ing your second compressor (couple it with an EQ pedal) and see what happens.
#5
Quote by dspellman
Vocals are often compressed in parallel -- you might try that rather than processing in series. A second track of the same vocals are given a different amount of compression and then blended back in with the first track, which may have a lighter compression, for example. Vocals are also subjected to a de-esser, which is essentially a compressor that's only compressing a specific range (say, around 7Khz). So you may want to consider EQ-ing your second compressor (couple it with an EQ pedal) and see what happens.


True about the parallel on the vocals but there's a lot of in line going on too according to the studio blogger types,even back in the day. I tried it myself with some rock vocals,it just sat there in the mix as bold as brass,every word audible no matter what you threw at it. Really good tip that was,they were my own vocals too and I'm no great shakes as a singer. I found that the voice developed character too as I layered up the compression stages,which helped the mojo and made me re sing some phrases with a bit more gusto knowing that the compression stages were going to let it sit right at the end. Great tool.

Yep,a gentle bit of eq ing before the second compressor sounds feasable, I'm fascinated with the idea of subtley stacking it one after the other though.
#7
Quote by Tony Done
It's an interesting idea, I'll try it and report back.


Nice one. Please do.
#8
OK I tried it, a Cheap Behringer two-knob Dynacomp knockoff followed by BYOC opti compressor.

There was a noitcveable increase in noise, as I expected, strange things happened to the attack, and "squish" increased. I think it could be worth experimenting further, but I would see it as a distinct effect, comparable to, say subtle autowah, rather than a more efficient compressor.
#9
Quote by Tony Done
OK I tried it, a Cheap Behringer two-knob Dynacomp knockoff followed by BYOC opti compressor.

There was a noitcveable increase in noise, as I expected, strange things happened to the attack, and "squish" increased. I think it could be worth experimenting further, but I would see it as a distinct effect, comparable to, say subtle autowah, rather than a more efficient compressor.


Hmmm. Doesn't sound promising so far. Thanks for that Tony. I'll try blagging a 2nd comp today.