#1
When I write a new song I get very excited about it 3 days later I don't see anything special about it and move on to other songs/riffs/etc.. wich causes stuff to pile up and be unfinished..
I must have like 200 "songs" that I started this last year but only finished 20 or so because I wanted to upload them to youtube, now I notice nobody cares and that motivation that uploading gave me is gone.

I'm always trying to come up with new stuff wich means I don't get back to the older stuff.
I'm like this with music that isn't mine aswell I get really excited about say stairway to heaven or golden brown or tubullar bells listen to it 400 times in a week and then I can no longer listen to it, just doesn't feel the same maybe, I'm subconsciously making associations of my feelings to the particular songs and then the feeling changes the song gets boring IDK..
Do you ever feel this too?
I think that if I had a band I would probably write the stuff before I got bored of it but idk, I've never been in a serious band.

So.. How do you feel about your music??
#2
My music is great.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#3
I am a bit like that also, like any music if I hear it too much, I get sort of bored with it, and something new is always more awesome, but usually if I listen back to it later, I will like it again for the reasons I liked it before. But it depends on the song also. I like some stuff I've done more than others. But sometimes I might really like one aspect, but not something else, like the lyrics but not the guitar, or vice versa. Some music has pretty good lasting power with me also. I still that track in my sig, and I must have heard it about a zillion times, and some smaller parts looped over and over as I wrote and produced it all, but I still like it.

I have a huge amount of riffs etcetera that might never get revisited because I prefer to do new stuff also, but every once in a while, I might go through some of them and hit something cool and feel like finishing it.

I like to work on one thing at a time, so I might come up with something really cool, but I'm in the middle of something else so it gets recorded and filed away, and maybe will become something awesome, or be lost basically forever. Which really sucks, because I know there are a bunch that I would think are really cool, and would want to do something with it, but when you get a certain number of things like that, it becomes too much to go through really.
#4
Quote by theogonia777
My music is great.

Why aren't you famous then?
#5
i feel the same way, i have a lot of discarded ideas. i have a few finished ones though. when i think about the individual riffs and elements of those songs, or play it on guitar, i'm usually underwhelmed, but when i listen to the song, i love it. i find it difficult to step back and evaluate when i have the guitar in my hands.
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#6
Quote by J23L
Why aren't you famous then?


Because writing great music doesn't guarantee fame. The guy that wrote The Rocky Road to Dublin isn't famous and he wrote the greatest song ever. Besides, my music is not really for everyone so it isn't commercially viable and as a result I will likely never be any more famous for it than Falkenbach, Horn, or Drudkh.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#7
Quote by J23L
Why aren't you famous then?
Dylan Carlson's music is great and he isn't famous Seriously though, stop conflating "good" with "popular". Justin Bieber, Quentin Tarantino and Enter Shikari are "popular". The general public don't have a bloody clue about art, and view almost all of it through a hard-formalist lens. All surface level and very little deeper meaning or willingness to accept work that challenges them.

and let's be real if your definition of being a successful creative is "serving other people" then that says a lot about your own individuality.

OT: My work... meh. I had some very meh ideas but it was all soulless experimentation with no consideration for what it meant for me or the viewer. It was just dicking about with drones. Nowadays I'm a little more considerate, but it's still quite shallow, if I'm honest with myself.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
Last edited by Banjocal at Dec 29, 2015,
#8
Hey now. Quentin Tarantino has done some good stuff though.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#9
I liked Jackie Brown a lot

the rest is amusing at first but ultimately it's entirely surface level. Mindless violence can be fun and the influence from graphic novels is really really interesting formally, but in terms of what it actually offers me? nothing much. it's formalism, but REALLY well made
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
Last edited by Banjocal at Dec 29, 2015,
#10
So do you watch movies that are the visual equivalent of drone?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#11
Quote by Banjocal
Dylan Carlson's music is great and he isn't famous Seriously though, stop conflating "good" with "popular". Justin Bieber, Quentin Tarantino and Enter Shikari are "popular". The general public don't have a bloody clue about art, and view almost all of it through a hard-formalist lens. All surface level and very little deeper meaning or willingness to accept work that challenges them.

and let's be real if your definition of being a successful creative is "serving other people" then that says a lot about your own individuality.

OT: My work... meh. I had some very meh ideas but it was all soulless experimentation with no consideration for what it meant for me or the viewer. It was just dicking about with drones. Nowadays I'm a little more considerate, but it's still quite shallow, if I'm honest with myself.


But Justin bieber is way better than us he is a genius, a miracle of nature..
I think you'r entitled to love your music, you at least liked it a little bit when you decided to record it
#12
^IDK it was more venting and experimenting. It was fun but, well, you can listen for yourself. It's pretty crappy drone/folk really. I learned from it. I'm grateful for that. RE Bieber, perhaps as a businessman or an entertainer. I see no value in the former and a little for the latter

Quote by theogonia777
So do you watch movies that are the visual equivalent of drone?
idk there's Derek Jarman's Blue there are some very simple video pieces like Richardson's 3 Church Walk which I like a lot. I'm not as big on film tbh. There are some I get 'more' out of. I'm no expert, but I still find Tarantino's work to be very shallow, but visually impressive. If there are any you'd recommend I'd be very grateful for your recs. ppl keep talking about Koyaanisqatsi but I'm yet to see it
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
Last edited by Banjocal at Dec 29, 2015,
#13
I do find by the time I finish writing a complete song Ive gone over it so many times that I don't even know if it's any good by that point... Usually after being able to leave it for a while then going back and listening to it I will enjoy it again
#14
Quote by theogonia777
My music is great.

Nothing wrong with that. I think my music is great too.
#15
Quote by GoldenGuitar
Nothing wrong with that. I think my music is great too.


Careful. People are going to start asking you why you aren't famous.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#16
Quote by GoldenGuitar
Nothing wrong with that. I think my music is great too.


then why aren't you famous??
#17
Quote by João1993
then why aren't you famous??


He is famous. He played guitar in Tame Impala, you know.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#18
#19
Quote by João1993
then why aren't you famous??

Is that why you make music? To be famous? And not because you love it?
#20
Quote by GoldenGuitar
Is that why you make music? To be famous? And not because you love it?


I don't want fame I want the money! and I do love making music
#21
Quote by GoldenGuitar
Is that why you make music? To be famous? And not because you love it?

I was only joking.
#22
Quote by J23L
I was only joking.

Wait, dude you didn't even make that comment. It was the other guy.
#23
Quote by João1993
I don't want fame I want the money! and I do love making music

If you want to be money you're in the wrong profession buddy.
#24
Quote by GoldenGuitar
If you want to be money you're in the wrong profession buddy.

I just want to make money doing something I love.. I know it's next to impossible but I don't care I'll die trying
we spend about half of our life time doing a job I want to like my job
I don't know why your mad.. I was trolling the other guy
Last edited by João1993 at Dec 30, 2015,
#25
Quote by João1993
I just want to make money doing something I love.. I know it's next to impossible

No it's not. It's pretty easy to make money if you know how to play. I just made 100 bucks from playing in a church and all i did was play minor pentatonic with the band haha. Easy money
#26
Quote by João1993
I just want to make money doing something I love.. I know it's next to impossible
As J23L says, it's not too hard to make money from music.
Making a living from it (so you don't need any other kind of job) - now that is more challenging . But still possible, if you work long and hard enough. (But it's unlikely to be your own music that will get you there. It will be popular covers, mostly. Your own songs may get you a gratifying youtube following, but don't expect them to make you any money.)
As for getting rich'n'famous - now that IS "next to impossible". You need a lot more than musical skill (or "talent" if you want to call it that) to do that. You need bloody-minded self-belief, and a lot of luck. Good looks will help too....

As for your original question - I think my music is great. I wouldn't play it (or write it) if I didn't think that. I don't necessarily expect anyone else to agree, although my experience so far is reasonably positive.
That's not to say I haven't written crap in the past - one's tastes and perceptions change. Of course, I thought those songs were great at the time - otherwise, as I say, I wouldn't have bothered.
IOW, at any one time, I only play (or write) what I think is great at that time. Why would I do anything else?
Last edited by jongtr at Dec 30, 2015,
#27
Quote by J23L
No it's not. It's pretty easy to make money if you know how to play. I just made 100 bucks from playing in a church and all i did was play minor pentatonic with the band haha. Easy money


I'm inexperienced in performing I haven't been in a band and as such I feel like even if someone made that deal to me I'd be like nah I don't know if I can do that even though i probably could..
#28
Quote by João1993
I'm inexperienced in performing I haven't been in a band and as such I feel like even if someone made that deal to me I'd be like nah I don't know if I can do that even though i probably could..

You have to break out of that mentality. You will never know for sure if you're "ready", but you have to prepare as much as possible and throw yourself out there. If you succeed that's great, but if you fail you will become a much better musician and you will be ready next time you perform. Either way, you win. Most people in the world are too scared to do stuff and only think negatively. If you want something don't be scared to go get it.
#29
Quote by J23L
You have to break out of that mentality. You will never know for sure if you're "ready", but you have to prepare as much as possible and throw yourself out there. If you succeed that's great, but if you fail you will become a much better musician and you will be ready next time you perform. Either way, you win. Most people in the world are too scared to do stuff and only think negatively. If you want something don't be scared to go get it.


thank you for the advice!
I would love to be a studio musician I wonder if I really have to know theory to do so I believe I have very good ears I wonder if studio musicians are able to know the piece they're playing before they hit the studio or if they have to read music..
#30
Quote by João1993
thank you for the advice!
I would love to be a studio musician I wonder if I really have to know theory to do so I believe I have very good ears I wonder if studio musicians are able to know the piece they're playing before they hit the studio or if they have to read music..

A lot of well-known guitarists do not know a lot of technical stuff. Most of them do not know how to read music either. Players like Dave Grohl, Hendrix,Slash,etc do not know shit from a technical standpoint. They just know how to physically play the guitar extremely well and they know how to structure songs.
I wouldn't say knowing theory is vital, but it can help you out if you're stuck in a rut.
#31
Quote by João1993
thank you for the advice!
I would love to be a studio musician I wonder if I really have to know theory to do so I believe I have very good ears I wonder if studio musicians are able to know the piece they're playing before they hit the studio or if they have to read music..

I would guess a studio musician pretty much needs to know theory and be able to read sheet music. But if you just want to record your own album, it doesn't really matter.

But if you want to become a professional musician, why would you not learn theory and learn to read sheet music at least at a basic level? I mean, it will be much easier to communicate with you that way.

Becoming a professional studio musician is definitely not easy. There are hundreds of guitarists that could do the job better than you. That's just how it is. And if you don't know theory and can't read sheet music, they will most likely pick somebody else (because there are many guitarists who do know theory and can read sheet music and are also more technical players than you).

What I would expect a studio musician to be really good at is being able to adapt to new situations. A studio musician needs to know a lot of styles.

If you have never played in a band before and want to become a studio musician, that's not going to happen. Get some (I mean, a lot of) band playing experience first. And I guess you would benefit from playing in many different kind of bands, not just in a band that plays one style all the time.

Quote by J23L
A lot of well-known guitarists do not know a lot of technical stuff. Most of them do not know how to read music either. Players like Dave Grohl, Hendrix,Slash,etc do not know shit from a technical standpoint. They just know how to physically play the guitar extremely well and they know how to structure songs.
I wouldn't say knowing theory is vital, but it can help you out if you're stuck in a rut.

The thing with those guys is that they are not studio musicians. They do their own stuff. And theory knowledge/knowing how to read music is not absolutely necessary if you do your own stuff.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Dec 30, 2015,
#32
I love my own music. I always felt that if I ever made a CD I'd be the kind of chump who'd sit around listening to their own music.

No CD's but I still listen to my "demos" on occasion. Not too shabby.
#33
Quote by theogonia777
My music is great.

The best answer!

I love my music, too.

It's really something!