#1
I have been playing a lot of rhythm over the years and have been getting quite good at it, but lately I started playing more lead. On the higher strings I have no problems keeping my wrist straight in classical position, but on the lower strings I am unable to do so and keep the stretch I need (for example 8-10-12) without bending my wrist.
After some playing this starts to hurt my wrist and no matter how much I try to shift my guitar, hand, shoulder and arm, I cant seem to fix it.

So I thought I would try the most sensible thing and ask people who know a lot more about this as I do myself :3. In included some pictures so hopefully somebody can help me here. Like I said, on the higher strings I have no problem keeping my wrist straight but on the lower strings I cant do it without losing the stretch I need for certain parts. Perhaps it is a thing I have to get used to, perhaps its an easy fix I'm overlooking so any input would be very much appreciated.

http://i.imgur.com/m528kcX.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/i7Eanee.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/0dW0WHs.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/J2vZWFa.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/lE4De4c.jpg
#2
From http://i.imgur.com/0dW0WHs.jpg, your wrist looks much too bent. It's never a good idea to keep that amount of bend for anything other than a very short time (hand mechanics).

For me, my wrist is only very slightly bent to play the shape you are playing.

I suspect you may need to work on flexibility in the joints nearest your finger tips, so you can then bring your hand in to relieve that bend in the wrist, and still make good contact with the strings. Or maybe your strap is too low?
#3
Quote by jerrykramskoy
From http://i.imgur.com/0dW0WHs.jpg, your wrist looks much too bent. It's never a good idea to keep that amount of bend for anything other than a very short time (hand mechanics).

For me, my wrist is only very slightly bent to play the shape you are playing.

I suspect you may need to work on flexibility in the joints nearest your finger tips, so you can then bring your hand in to relieve that bend in the wrist, and still make good contact with the strings. Or maybe your strap is too low?


On the strap too low thing, I have the same issue when playing as I sit down and people have commented on me wearing my strap quite high, but I could experiment a bit with that at least, so thanks for the imput.

Regarding the flexibility in the joints, how would I go about working on that? What sort of exercises would I use for that?

I personally find it quite odd how I am able to keep my wrist straight on the higher strings but am unable to keep it so on the lower ones, makes certain pieces painful or impossible to play without discomfort. I would rather try and fix it so I wont hurt my wrist.
#4
ok...

check john stowell..granted his technique is extreme..but note WHERE his wrist/hand is

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQByL8nSXps

its a classical approach for sure but check out some top players for their positions of wrist/hand when they are on the lower strings

hope this helps
play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Dec 31, 2015,
#5
I wouldn't even say it's about flexibility, since the idea is to keep your wrist flat. You just have to curl your fingers in a little more.

If you're getting pain, I'd say that tension is also an issue.

It's best to practice technique with the guitar up on your left knee, like a classical player.

When you're playing lead lines on the lower strings there is really no reason to keep your fingers clear of the fretboard on the higher strings. Letting the rest of your left hand relax onto the fretboard is part of left hand muting, which is essential technique. There is also no rule that your palm has to stay behind the fretoboard.

Try this: do some scales with the "rule" that only the tip of your thumb touches the neck, and that it touches the neck only on the upper half (above where the G is on the front of the fretboard). Not that you should play that way all the time, but doing so for a few minutes will force your wrist into a better position. Remember that your thumb is there for stability, not pressure.
Last edited by cdgraves at Dec 31, 2015,