#1
My LP 100 is supposed to arrive in a few hours (Wil post pictures of it). It's my first guitar and I'm more than excited for it to arrive. But is there anything any of you would've done differently when you first started playing? Some tips would be appreciated as well.
#2
Well you haven't really mentioned anything playing wise so how can we say we would do anything differently? What are you doing now?


I mean, if you're just talking about your guitar purchase, I probably wouldn't have bought that particular guitar.
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#4
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Well you haven't really mentioned anything playing wise so how can we say we would do anything differently? What are you doing now?

I mean, if you're just talking about your guitar purchase, I probably wouldn't have bought that particular guitar.

+1
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#5
For a first guitar I wish I had something that nice when I started playing. My first two guitars were garbage but I learned to play with them and I loved having them. I think you're being a little harsh on first timer who is excited to get his first guitar. Could be a lot worse like a Bullet Strat.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#6
1. Have the guitar setup properly by someone who knows what they are doing.

2. Take lessons from day 1. Learning proper technique like how to hold the guitar, how to position your thumb on the fretboard, etc. are essential. Good posture will help you dramatically.

3. For part of this posture kick, buy or use some sort of foot rest to keep proper posture sitting down and use the classical position - guitar between your legs.

4. Practice equally sitting and standing and learn how to do both.

5. Find a guitar tone you like at a volume that works for you. This may not be in a traditional amp. If you have a starter kit amp throw it away. Amp sims on the computer are awesome these days - a Rocksmith Video Game cable (go ahead and get the game along with your lessons) and Peavey ReValver (the free version is great to start with) will get you going for $20. . .

6. Learn at least basic music theory from day 1.

7. Practice every day, even if it is just for a few minutes.

8. Have fun with it.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
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Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#7
Quote by Rickholly74
For a first guitar I wish I had something that nice when I started playing. My first two guitars were garbage but I learned to play with them and I loved having them. I think you're being a little harsh on first timer who is excited to get his first guitar. Could be a lot worse like a Bullet Strat.



TBF just because it's nicer than what you started with in 1974, doesn't mean that we're limited in options and you couldn't spend your money better in 2015.


Sure, you could learn or a shitty unplayable mess of a guitar (I did as well) but it's better and not much more costly to get something better than an LP-100. I mean, I'd take a Pacifica or something from Rondo over one.

I'm not saying the LP-100 is the worst guitar in the world either. Just saying it's not what I would go for.


Quote by metalmingee
1. Have the guitar setup properly by someone who knows what they are doing.

2. Take lessons from day 1. Learning proper technique like how to hold the guitar, how to position your thumb on the fretboard, etc. are essential. Good posture will help you dramatically.

3. For part of this posture kick, buy or use some sort of foot rest to keep proper posture sitting down and use the classical position - guitar between your legs.

4. Practice equally sitting and standing and learn how to do both.

5. Find a guitar tone you like at a volume that works for you. This may not be in a traditional amp. If you have a starter kit amp throw it away. Amp sims on the computer are awesome these days - a Rocksmith Video Game cable (go ahead and get the game along with your lessons) and Peavey ReValver (the free version is great to start with) will get you going for $20. . .

6. Learn at least basic music theory from day 1.

7. Practice every day, even if it is just for a few minutes.

8. Have fun with it.



I think that's pretty solid for the most part.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
Last edited by H4T3BR33D3R at Dec 30, 2015,
#8
Quote by ThatOneNewb
My LP 100 is supposed to arrive in a few hours (Wil post pictures of it). It's my first guitar and I'm more than excited for it to arrive. But is there anything any of you would've done differently when you first started playing? Some tips would be appreciated as well.


If you have not gotten an amp yet make sure you get one that sounds great with the guitar!

Sometimes certain guitars regardless of price and quality and brand and build can be so specific in one tonal direction that not every time you plug into an amp is going get a great inspiring tone.

The guitar is unlimited and you can play whatever you want to play.

Focus on what you want to play. And most importantly only the weak spots each one at the time!

Then get the material on what you want to learn the way you want to learn it.
#9
Quote by metalmingee
1. Have the guitar setup properly by someone who knows what they are doing.

2. Take lessons from day 1. Learning proper technique like how to hold the guitar, how to position your thumb on the fretboard, etc. are essential. Good posture will help you dramatically.

3. For part of this posture kick, buy or use some sort of foot rest to keep proper posture sitting down and use the classical position - guitar between your legs.

4. Practice equally sitting and standing and learn how to do both.

5. Find a guitar tone you like at a volume that works for you. This may not be in a traditional amp. If you have a starter kit amp throw it away. Amp sims on the computer are awesome these days - a Rocksmith Video Game cable (go ahead and get the game along with your lessons) and Peavey ReValver (the free version is great to start with) will get you going for $20. . .

6. Learn at least basic music theory from day 1.

7. Practice every day, even if it is just for a few minutes.

8. Have fun with it.


Good list.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#10
Quote by ThatOneNewb
Thank you all for the feedback! I haven't purchased an amp yet, but any suggestions would be appreciated.



Well, what's your budget, where are you located, what genres do you play and are you willing to buy used?
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#11
Thank you all for the feedback! I haven't purchased an amp yet, but any suggestions would be appreciated. I'm not sure if this matters or not, but the kind of music I'm interested in playing is nirvana, motley crue, ac/dc, etc.
#12
You completely ignored my post that was meant to help you get an amp.


If you want an answer, then answer those questions cause they are important.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#13
Number one thing: Researched a lot more before purchasing gear. Could have saved me tons of money and a lot of frustration. Today? I think I'd be able to get some really nice gear for the price of that horrible acoustic, mediocre electric and too-much-of-a-compromise amp.

Apart from that...

No. What helped me in learning and staying with it? A clear vision of where I was, where I wanted to go and all I needed was to figure how to get from A to B. A very defined taste that helped me focus on what I liked and wanted to do. And last but not least, a couple of friends to compete with.

I took a few lessons, but they were worthless. You don't need a teacher if you know better than the teacher.
"Your signature can not be longer than 250 characters."

How you know you have too many guitars...

Apparently once also known as PonyFan #834553.
#14
I'll also suggest lessons since you're starting out. The reason I say it is so you don't develop a lot of the bad habits self taught players normally have. Music theory is also essential as a musician. A great habit to get into is to practice with a metronome at all times. For an amp that won't break the bank I recommend you get a good modeler like the roland cube or peavey vypers so you can experiment with what effects you like.
ESP E-II Horizon FR
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ESP M-II Deluxe EMG 81/SA
Marshall JCM2000 DSL/ JCM800 1960a cab
Mesa Mark V 25
#15
If I were starting over I would get a professional setup done on the guitar ASAP so I don’t have to waste time thinking about it.

Then I’d move on the to learning. I’d split my time between learning to read standard notation and understand music theory with the help of a good music teacher. Otherwise you just run into a wall when you start get past simple tabs and pentatonic scale noodling. The other half I’d spend playing Rocksmith to build up playing chops quickly.

And I would start playing with other musicians ASAP. Just play simple shit—Ramones, QotSA, etc. Some of the biggest bands ever are the ones that didn’t spend ten years mastering their technique before starting a band.
Last edited by jpnyc at Dec 30, 2015,
#16
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
You completely ignored my post that was meant to help you get an amp.


If you want an answer, then answer those questions cause they are important.

He most likely didn't see your post (it was posted only 3 minutes earlier).


I would suggest getting a modeler. In the beginning it's good to have something versatile. Something that gives you an idea of how different stuff will sound like. Your preferences may also change - maybe you discover a new genre or find playing Nirvana boring or whatever. That's why it's good to start with a modeler. They also come with effects so you will also get a good idea of how different kind of effects will sound like and won't end up wasting money on random pedals that you don't find any use for.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

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Yamaha P115
#17
Find a highly recommended guitar teacher/mentor and pay attention. When I was 16 I had a great jazz guitar teacher but I was young and stupid and thought I knew better. I didn't. I only absorbed about 10% of what this world class teacher had to offer and this I regret. Pay attention and learn the vocabulary of guitar even if you don't think it is relevant now, or applies to your personal style. It will apply later.

Learning everything in your bedroom on your own is highly overrated IMO and stunts your growth as a musician.

Play with other musicians often. Get together and jam, learn songs, collaborate. This is where the magic happens.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#18
Not so much what I wish I'd done differently, but something I'm glad I had a teacher to tell me.

Don't neglect using your pinky just because it's uncomfortable at first. Just start using it from day one and it can learn along with the rest of your fingers.
#19
Quote by ltdguy27
I'll also suggest lessons since you're starting out. The reason I say it is so you don't develop a lot of the bad habits self taught players normally have. Music theory is also essential as a musician. A great habit to get into is to practice with a metronome at all times. For an amp that won't break the bank I recommend you get a good modeler like the roland cube or peavey vypers so you can experiment with what effects you like.


Would be a much more helpful post if you'd specified what the bad habits were. The way I see it, there aren't any real secrets behind guitarplaying that you can't figure out by yourself with available resources like a book & the internet. Good teachers aren't plentiful. I'd say they are rare, and charge thereafter.

The only bullet-proof reason to get a teacher would be if you'd think it would inspire you to play more and if you are a person who need others to put up a schedule for your practice... but then, why do you want to learn to play if you don't do it regardless?
"Your signature can not be longer than 250 characters."

How you know you have too many guitars...

Apparently once also known as PonyFan #834553.
#20
Well, I'm not gonna sugar coat this. Learning guitar can REALLY suck at first. Here's my advice: Stick with it. There are going to be times where you don't want to play anymore and that it seems impossible. Just keep pounding through and practicing, varying your practice method to keep you interested. Once you get the hang of it, it's great. Just keep the end goal in mind.
-Andrew H
band: syncopated groove punch
#21
Three things that I always tell my students.

1. Never end on a bad note.
2. Spend the first five minutes of your practice on something new or challenging.
3. Play EVERY DAY. Even if it's just five minutes.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

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youre just being a jerk man.



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