#1
There's currently a humbucker installed, previous owner says it is a JB. There are no logos, and it isn't custom ordered so I'm thinking only the old models have that. I don't know how to identify or where to look a model number for.
#2
pull it out of the body and see what it says.

i am not an expert on old SD pickups, but it should say something on the back.

i may be a little bit of a pessimist, but i have very little faith in what sellers say if they can't back it up.
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Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



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#3
Quote by trashedlostfdup
pull it out of the body and see what it says.

i am not an expert on old SD pickups, but it should say something on the back.

i may be a little bit of a pessimist, but i have very little faith in what sellers say if they can't back it up.

It'll have a sticker on the back that will say SH-4 if it's a JB.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#4
Quote by reliqua
There's currently a humbucker installed, previous owner says it is a JB.


My rule of thumb is that I don't pay extra for aftermarket parts installed on guitars, and that it really doesn't increase the value of a used guitar, no matter what the current owner says he has invested.
#5
Quote by dspellman
My rule of thumb is that I don't pay extra for aftermarket parts installed on guitars, and that it really doesn't increase the value of a used guitar, no matter what the current owner says he has invested.


+1. Upgrades on other people’s guitars generally aren’t upgrades. There’s usually no way of knowing if electronics are legit or if the work was done well without taking the guitar apart, so any non-original parts means the guitar is worth at least 20% less than the going rate for a stock guitar. Of course rare exceptions should be made for things like Kinman or TV Jones pickups, especially if somebody already paid a luthier to install them in a semihollow guitar.
#6
Quote by jpnyc
+1. Upgrades on other people’s guitars generally aren’t upgrades. There’s usually no way of knowing if electronics are legit or if the work was done well without taking the guitar apart, so any non-original parts means the guitar is worth at least 20% less than the going rate for a stock guitar. Of course rare exceptions should be made for things like Kinman or TV Jones pickups, especially if somebody already paid a luthier to install them in a semihollow guitar.


sorry can't buy into this at all. why make an exception for kinman or tv jones in a semi hollow? that's all about preference and not subjective at all. upgrades are in the eye of the beholder and so is the determination to whether they add value or not. while i agree that a seller can't realistically expect the buyer to cover the full costs of his "upgrades" that does mean they don't add some value. if the upgrades are ones that i would have done myself i don't have a problem with paying a reasonable premium over regular used price. that may only be $50 or less but it's still something. things like labor paid etc isn't my problem so i won't pay extra cuz the seller did on that count. i don't know about you guys but when i go to say Guitar Center i always look for guitars that have had obvious upgrades in the used section. GC will up the price by a little (usualy not more than $25) if the guitar has upgrades which isn't that unreasonable. do i whine about that when buying sure but that's more about trying to squeeze out the best deal if possible. if i feel the guitar is reasonably priced then i'd buy it anyways (just doesn't hurt to try to get a better deal). i bought a MIM strat a couple of years back as a backup for my Strat+. GC had a MIM that had an LSR roller nut, Graphtec Saddles, Sperzel staggered locking tuners and a steel trem block installed as mods already (never took it apart to see what the pups are). they were asking $325 which is a mere $25 over the then top used price for a stock MIM. i got it for $300 but would have coughed up the rest gladly i mean c'mon how can you beat that.
#7
Surely if I spend $200 to replace stock Duncan Designed pickups for SD Blackouts, that should count for something, no?
#8
Quote by dthmtl3
Surely if I spend $200 to replace stock Duncan Designed pickups for SD Blackouts, that should count for something, no?


it should but you'd still take a beating. you really can't expect buyers of used items to pay a big premium for "improvements". you might be able to get an extra $50 over standard used price but that would depend on the guitar. if you put those in a guitar that is $200 new then you really can't expect diddly as most will view it as a $200 guitar that is used.
#9
Quote by dthmtl3
Surely if I spend $200 to replace stock Duncan Designed pickups for SD Blackouts, that should count for something, no?


Nope. Most people don’t want whatever pickup you put in, they want some other pickup. If someone wanted me to pay extra because a guitar had Blackouts I’d laugh in his face.

And as I noted above, unless they open up the guitar and pull out the pickups they don’t even know if you did the installation correctly. This is why you should always keep the stock electronics and put them back in before you sell a guitar.
#10
Quote by jpnyc
Nope. Most people don’t want whatever pickup you put in, they want some other pickup. If someone wanted me to pay extra because a guitar had Blackouts I’d laugh in his face.

And as I noted above, unless they open up the guitar and pull out the pickups they don’t even know if you did the installation correctly. This is why you should always keep the stock electronics and put them back in before you sell a guitar.


great but how would i know if you put them back in correctly
#11
Modding Rule #1: If you plan to sell the guitar down the line, or if you aren't sure keep all of the ORIGINAL parts and swap them back before you sell it.
WTLT 2014 GG&A

Quote by andersondb7
alright "king of the guitar forum"


Quote by trashedlostfdup
nope i am "GOD of the guitar forum" i think that fits me better.


Quote by andersondb7
youre just being a jerk man.



****** NEW NEW NEW!
2017-07-07 2017-07-07 Update and a Chat On Noise Constraints *** NEW FRIDAY 7/7
2017-04-13 RUN AWAY from COMPUTERS!!! TCE? RANT ALERT!!!
2017-03-02 - Guitar Philosophy 1001- Be Prepared For the Situation (Thursday 2017-03-02)
2017-02-21 How to Hot-Rod the Hell of your Stratocaster for $50! (Tuesday 2017-2-21)
Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie
---> http://trashedengineering.blogspot.com/
#12
Thanks guys, I checked the sticker at the back. The owner did include all the original parts, but not installed (V7 and V8). I just checked it, it's an hb102 , not a JB.. but a JB wannabe. Eh oh well. :C. I didn't pay extra for it though. So it's fine. But still. Owner also didn't know the exact model of the guitar, so meow.
Last edited by reliqua at Jan 2, 2016,
#13
I got lucky once and bought what my buddy told me was a Duncan JB for $20. It didn't have a logo on front. The sticker on the back wasn't a typical factory printed sticker but a small sticker that was hand stamped with JB-J, after some research I discovered it was indeed a JB but it had been hand wound in the custom shop by Maricela Juarez who has worked at Seymour Duncan for over 30 years and had made hand wound pickups for Eddie VanHalen, Malmsteen and most of Duncan's celebrity clients. These Maricela Juarez pups usually sell for $100+.

I have 2 other standard machine wound JBs and the difference between those and the hand wound are night and day. Generally they all sound like JBs but the custom shop is hotter and more sensitive to pinch harmonics it really screams.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
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#14
Quote by jpnyc
+1. Upgrades on other people’s guitars generally aren’t upgrades. There’s usually no way of knowing if electronics are legit or if the work was done well without taking the guitar apart, so any non-original parts means the guitar is worth at least 20% less than the going rate for a stock guitar. Of course rare exceptions should be made for things like Kinman or TV Jones pickups, especially if somebody already paid a luthier to install them in a semihollow guitar.


Provided you are allowed to see that the pickups are in fact swapped out, lets say for Lindy Fralin pups. So you know for sure, you are still dinging that guitar 20%?

A MIM Strat is roughly $275 in the first place. Are you saying that with Fralin pups that it should be worth $220? Because you'll never find that. A pickguard loaded with the pickups costs more than $220.

I get what you mean if you are buying a more expensive guitar. Your Les Paul Standard, PRS, Fender Vintage Series or CS.

That stuff is going to hold value, and hold it at thousands of dollars. So taking a stock pickup out of a PRS is going to reduce value.
#15
Quote by dthmtl3
Surely if I spend $200 to replace stock Duncan Designed pickups for SD Blackouts, that should count for something, no?


Not to me.

And there are a whole lot of reasons for that.

I'm usually looking for an original guitar. It's gotten nearly impossible to find a Gibson L6S, for example, that someone hasn't "improved" by swapping out pickups, tuners, nuts, pickups, pickup rings, knobs, pots, caps, substituting a three-way for the six-way pickup selector, swapping out the harmonica bridge for some ratty ass TOM. All those things might have meant something to the owner, but it's produced a "something else" guitar that's now far from what the manufacturer intended.

Most folks who swap things out do a crap job of it, and they don't even realize it; they think they did well -- until you point out the problems. Apparently a whole lot of people and a whole lot of techs don't really know how to solder. A lot of them don't understand grounding. A lot of them don't think clipping off the wires close to the pickup is an issue (besides, "it was easier"). I've seen bridges that don't fit, that have stripped posts, that tilt funny directions. I've seen nuts shimmed with newspaper, pieces of old picks, globs of dried glue, tiny chunks of wood. Same nuts with nut slots that have no relation to the radius of the fretboard, or that are so deep that it's almost a given that you're going to have to have it redone. Locking tuners that are misaligned and leave a hole from the original tuner. Tuner buttons that were forced on the tuner and are now at an angle (!). Same deal with knobs. The new knobs didn't fit because they were the wrong knobs, but they're sure on there now, and the shafts of the pots are bent, the edge of the knob is skimming the paint, etc. Soldering errors leave pots that just don't work at all off a full-on position, or that have dropouts because the interior has a melted bit. Scorched caps and resistors, 9V battery connectors that are hanging on by two strands, odd bits of "whatever was handy" wire, puddles of solder on the bottom of the control cavity and more.

I have one guitar that was sold to me as "all original." What *actually* happened was that the dingbat "upgraded" the guitar at some point, yanking the original pickups and saving them. When he sold the guitar, he pulled the "upgrade" pickups and slapped the originals back in, slinging solder like Slurpee juice in the hands of a 3 am drunk. One pickup was shorted out, two had extremely short leads, and the pots were trashed. I ripped out everything, tossed it, bought new and put it back in correctly. The only reason I kept the guitar was that it's a one-year-only model that's absolutely impossible to find otherwise, and it's done in solid koa.

If I want Blackouts in a guitar, I'll add them. Otherwise, I'd much prefer to buy the guitar I'm actually looking for in the condition it was intended. Guitars ALL come with pickups, knobs, pots, etc. No matter how much you spent putting in the pickups YOU like, there's a better than even chance that I won't want them. What you've done is to reduce the number of people who are looking for that guitar to that small subset that wants that particular guitar *with* a set of Blackouts. Or BareKnuckles. Or GFS Something or others. Don't expect me to pay MORE for that guitar when I'm going to have to rip out whatever brilliant idea you had and replace it with originals or whatever brilliant idea *I* have. You've just cost me money on top of annoyance.

Last January I bought an Agile AD-2300 from someone in Vancouver. The guitar new is a $299 guitar. The guy in Vancouver had spent $185 putting in a set of handwound P90's built by a local guy named Mike Reilander. The owner could NOT figure out why the guitar, used, was attracting absolutely NO interest at $130. I eventually bought it and found that the pickups were outstanding, but I took a gamble after talking to Mike (email) about the pickups. I got very lucky. And the owner got his guitar sold, but nearly didn't.

Upgrades are almost always sidegrades if they don't add something the guitar didn't already have (knobs, pickups, bridge, nut, tuners) no matter how good you think the new thing is. It's a SIDEgrade. No matter how much you spent for whatever it is, no matter how proud you are of the results.

I have a guitar, for example, that has over $1500 worth of work done. Virtually everything metal and electronic has been replaced, routing has been done, sustainers have been added, kill switches have been added, OFRs have replaced LFRs, a big brass sustain block is on the OFR, the guitar has been PLEK'd and its frets superglued. It is a *monster* guitar. To me. I don't expect to see a cent of that $1500 worth of goodies back, unless I do the sales job of the century. It's just how things are.