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#1
Hello UG

Some of you are teachers - not guitar teachers but actual teachers. I've seen a lot of people I know recently go into teaching and that is great, especially if they're passionate about it. Personally it's not for me but it'd be interesting to hear why you find teaching great and what brought you into it.

I've also recently seen one of my masters supervisors finish her PhD and become a teacher. I find this an odd decision to say at the least since it seems like a waste of resources and training in high level academic research at the cutting edge of science only to become a school teacher.

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#3
I would love to be a teacher. That's my plan after my "main career" is exhausted
My God, it's full of stars!
#4
I'm a teacher because it's part of a tuition waiver I get. I mean, I like it and all, but I wouldn't choose it as a profession. I talked to a guy who also got his M.A. in English, but he went into teaching. He said it was just year after year of trying to fix the same problems that never actually got fixed and he got really burnt out. He went into higher ed administration after that, which is also where I'd like to be.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#5
I love teaching private lessons/tutoring. I feel like I'm really good at working individually with students but I've been in several classroom type environments and I just get extremely stressed and feel guilty if not all the students are understanding the material.
#6
Some people find out too late that they like teaching.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#7
I think it would depend on what you are teaching, where and to whom, right?

I wouldn't mind going into teaching (among other things) when I'm older, but only in a specialized subject related to my career that I'm invested in and like, and to a group of college students or other adults trying to learn that.
However, I would never try to be a highschool teacher for instance, specially not in the public sector (with the constant infrastructure and institutional problems, low pay, problems with parents, constant strikes and fighting with the goverment, etc). I wouldn't see me having any sort of passion teaching geography/history/etc and stuff like that
Last edited by gonzaw at Jan 1, 2016,
#8
Quote by korinaflyingv
All my friends who are teachers now wish they had never become teachers.



As a secondary school teacher, yeah basically this.


And you're right, it is a waste of your knowledge to spend all day stopping little Timmy from punching little Sophie.

If you want the best work/life balance and the best intellectual challenge, teach at a 6th form/FE College where you can actually engage with the learners as responsible adults and teach your subject, not 'how to sit in a chair' or 'how to use a pen without snapping bits of it off to throw at little Timmy'.


#9
It feels like school/highschool teaching is more about you trying to be a positive influence on someone else's life, which, if done right, may shape them up to live a great life (and you feeling good about that), rather than being passionate about "passing down your knowledge" or stuff like that. Something like being a secondary parent.

Seems like something like "teaching" can either mean something more emotional to you, or something more technical/rational (teaching down specific knowledge), and everything in between.

Shouldn't there be different labels for it then?
#11
I just wanted to keep studying & reading/writing about books so I figured I'd go to grad school & some day way down the road I would end up teaching (I was doing English lit., so that is pretty much the only thing you do), but I wound up getting a position teaching freshman composition with acceptance into a M.A. program, so I kinda got thrown into it, & then I though "hey, this is alright." I don't really have the will to go through the PhD. process, so now I am trying to go back & get a state teaching certification.

To be honest, I was kinda trying to avoid teaching, at least until I could see what else was out there, but after spending 5 months applying to positions with no luck, I found myself interviewing for a couple sales/marketing gigs only to hear that I did not have enough experience -- fine by me, 'cuz they would have fucking sucked anyway. So I figured "Jesus Christ, I got a damn graduate degree & I'm not qualified for a job. Might as well just teach."

I don't know, maybe I'll end up doing something else in the future, but it seems dumb to hang around spinning my wheels at a bunch of crummy jobs or scrambling for adjunct paychecks just to pay the rent when I could have a pretty good job doing something I'm actually interested in. I mean, teaching seems to me like a pretty good job, anyway.
#12
i'd have to teach at some Catholic school where i could get away with throwing a desk or combo lock at a shithead kid.
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#13
Quote by neidnarb11890
I just wanted to keep studying & reading/writing about books so I figured I'd go to grad school & some day way down the road I would end up teaching (I was doing English lit., so that is pretty much the only thing you do), but I wound up getting a position teaching freshman composition with acceptance into a M.A. program, so I kinda got thrown into it, & then I though "hey, this is alright." I don't really have the will to go through the PhD. process, so now I am trying to go back & get a state teaching certification.

To be honest, I was kinda trying to avoid teaching, at least until I could see what else was out there, but after spending 5 months applying to positions with no luck, I found myself interviewing for a couple sales/marketing gigs only to hear that I did not have enough experience -- fine by me, 'cuz they would have fucking sucked anyway. So I figured "Jesus Christ, I got a damn graduate degree & I'm not qualified for a job. Might as well just teach."

I don't know, maybe I'll end up doing something else in the future, but it seems dumb to hang around spinning my wheels at a bunch of crummy jobs or scrambling for adjunct paychecks just to pay the rent when I could have a pretty good job doing something I'm actually interested in. I mean, teaching seems to me like a pretty good job, anyway.

that's the thing with English degrees. you can always fall back on teaching if you have to
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#15
Why are teachers always saying they don't make enough? Didn't they look into what it pays before they went and got that masters?
Last edited by mattedbird at Jan 2, 2016,
#16
Quote by mattedbird
Why are teachers always say they don't make enough? Didn't they look into what it pays before they went and got that masters?

I don't think they understand. Not everyone goes into a career because of how much it makes. At the same time, some careers do not earn enough based on the work put in. Teachers do not earn enough based on the time they have to put into their jobs, the training required, and what they have to deal with.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#17
Ha, my gym teacher made $60k for working 9 months a year from 8:00-2:30 with spring break, winter break, and every federal holiday off.

Slavery.
#18
Quote by EndTheRapture51


I've also recently seen one of my masters supervisors finish her PhD and become a teacher. I find this an odd decision to say at the least since it seems like a waste of resources and training in high level academic research at the cutting edge of science only to become a school teacher.

"only to become a school teacher"? I feel like that's rather condescending..
Teaching can be immediately rewarding whereas "high level academic research" takes months upon months to even get the ball rolling - depending on the type of research it can take years upon years to finish just one project. This could be why she chose to teach
#19
Quote by Rossenrot
Ha, my gym teacher made $60k for working 9 months a year from 8:00-2:30 with spring break, winter break, and every federal holiday off.

Slavery.

Our teachers make like 40,000 a year working 40 hours a week, plus all the stuff they have to do on their own time. Plus all the supplies they have to buy for their classes due to a lack of funding.

and kids, man. I don't know how anyone fucking stands them getting paid that much after getting a college degree and shit. and dealing with the parents
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#20
Quote by BladeSlinger
Our teachers make like 40,000 a year working 40 hours a week, plus all the stuff they have to do on their own time. Plus all the supplies they have to buy for their classes due to a lack of funding.

and kids, man. I don't know how anyone fucking stands them getting paid that much after getting a college degree and shit. and dealing with the parents


They don't make $40,000 a year. They make on average over $50,000 for 9 months, minus the above mentioned holidays. It's a lot of money, plus retirement, plus benefits, plus union protections. I'm also not sure where you get this lack of funding idea either; we spend more per pupil than any other nation.

Also, lets face it, BAs in Education are a joke. I'm not sympathetic to anyone who chooses to work with kids that complains about working with kids, either.
#21
Opening education jobs are like 30k a year here and require a 4 year degree for up to 6th grade and two 4 year degrees for anything above 6th grade.
#22
Quote by Rossenrot
They don't make $40,000 a year. They make on average over $50,000 for 9 months, minus the above mentioned holidays. It's a lot of money, plus retirement, plus benefits, plus union protections. I'm also not sure where you get this lack of funding idea either; we spend more per pupil than any other nation.

Also, lets face it, BAs in Education are a joke. I'm not sympathetic to anyone who chooses to work with kids that complains about working with kids, either.

The number I used is for my state specifically, but I think it's closer to 45,000. We keep cutting education. A lot of teachers have to pay out of pocket for supplies in their classroom. The 40 hour work week is just time at the actual school when a lot of teachers have to do a significant amount of work on their own time. From what I've heard, Oklahoma has a problem with people getting degrees here then going elsewhere to teach because they provide better jobs.


I'm just saying I couldn't be a teacher because dealing with kids. Couldn't do it. Most teachers I know just take it as part of the job.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#23
i've been wondering for a while what state laws there are for teaching since there was this one alumni who came to teach French at my high school, but he was still in the process of getting his degree. dude couldn't have been older than 23. the high school was apparently paying part of his tuition fees, too.

not like i wanted him fired or anything, i've just been curious.
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#24
Quote by Rossenrot

Also, lets face it, BAs in Education are a joke. I'm not sympathetic to anyone who chooses to work with kids that complains about working with kids, either.


Do you think that choosing to join the military means you can't complain about anything related to being in the military?
My God, it's full of stars!
#25
Quote by BladeSlinger
The number I used is for my state specifically, but I think it's closer to 45,000. We keep cutting education. A lot of teachers have to pay out of pocket for supplies in their classroom. The 40 hour work week is just time at the actual school when a lot of teachers have to do a significant amount of work on their own time. From what I've heard, Oklahoma has a problem with people getting degrees here then going elsewhere to teach because they provide better jobs.


School days are 6 hours long. 6 x 5 = 30.

Also, many of my friends and family are teachers. The unanimous consensus among them is that the "teachers are underpaid heroes" trope is the product of people who ought to be nowhere near a classroom.

Quote by Dreadnought
Do you think that choosing to join the military means you can't complain about anything related to being in the military?


Becoming a teacher despite pedophobia is akin to joining the military as a conscientious objector.
Last edited by Rossenrot at Jan 1, 2016,
#26
C'mon, we all see bradulator. Therefore we know that teachers are really dirtbags
My God, it's full of stars!
#27
Quote by Rossenrot
School days are 6 hours long. 6 x 5 = 30.

Also, many of my friends and family are teachers. The unanimous consensus among them is that the "teachers are underpaid heroes" trope is the product of people who ought to be nowhere near a classroom.

Yea, for the students. Except, teachers don't get there right as their classes start or leave exactly when the bell rings. It's at least 35 hours per week with the added time.

And your experience might support the idea that complainers just shouldn't teach. Almost every teacher I've spoken to has expressed the idea that this part of the country mistreats its teachers. That's coming from regular secondary school teachers, PhD level instructors who only teach college, and PhD level instructors who have previously taught secondary.

I don't think they're underpaid heroes. They're just underpaid. People who are underpaid typically get tired of their job, and that drives other people away.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#28
Quote by BladeSlinger
Yea, for the students. Except, teachers don't get there right as their classes start or leave exactly when the bell rings. It's at least 35 hours per week with the added time.

And your experience might support the idea that complainers just shouldn't teach. Almost every teacher I've spoken to has expressed the idea that this part of the country mistreats its teachers. That's coming from regular secondary school teachers, PhD level instructors who only teach college, and PhD level instructors who have previously taught secondary.

I don't think they're underpaid heroes. They're just underpaid. People who are underpaid typically get tired of their job, and that drives other people away.


Lets be generous and say its 40 hours a week. Multiply that by 4.3 (rounding up) for the amount of weeks in a month. Multiply that by 9 for the amount of months they work, ignoring the fact that they have massive breaks in between, federal holidays, and possible sick and snow days. That's 1,548 hours of work per year, figuring VERY generously.

Now lets say that the average salary of an American teacher K-12 isn't $52,000 a year, but $40,000 a year.

That's $25.8 an hour figured conservatively. Figuring accurately puts the number around $35-40 an hour, with benefits. Cry me a fucking river.
#29
Quote by Rossenrot
Lets be generous and say its 40 hours a week. Multiply that by 4.3 (rounding up) for the amount of weeks in a month. Multiply that by 9 for the amount of months they work, ignoring the fact that they have massive breaks in between, federal holidays, and possible sick and snow days. That's 1,548 hours of work per year, figuring VERY generously.

Now lets say that the average salary of an American teacher K-12 isn't $52,000 a year, but $40,000 a year.

That's $25.8 an hour figured conservatively. Figuring accurately puts the number around $35-40 an hour, with benefits. Cry me a fucking river.

Except that 40 hour work week is just their time at school. That doesn't include the time needed for grading, after school activities that are often mandatory, training for new educational standard, and certification renewal. Teachers also tend to work weekends more than other professions. All that shit account for at least another 8-10 hours a week depending on the school. 35-40 hours accounts for the time the teachers are actually at school doing their jobs, but significantly more work goes into it. Don't know if you've ever had to grade papers, but it's fucking time consuming.

That would add another 40 hours per month roughly, making for another two months worth of work by the end of it, and that wouldn't even account for the myth that teachers just sit around all summer doing nothing. They still have to go to meetings, set up classroom, make lesson plans, and renew certification shit. A lot of teachers around here have to pick up second jobs.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#30
Sweet Jesus. I figured generously and came up with $25.8 an hour. The Manhattan Institute came up with $34.06, for all teachers, regardless of experience, but we'll ignore that. Go ahead and take another $5 an hour off my super generous figure, which is to decrease an already conservative (fictitious) number by 20%. $20 an hour is what an average prison guard makes working in a prison. But hey, you don't like kids.
#31
Quote by Rossenrot
Sweet Jesus. I figured generously and came up with $25.8 an hour. The Manhattan Institute came up with $34.06, for all teachers, regardless of experience, but we'll ignore that. Go ahead and take another $5 an hour off my super generous figure, which is to decrease an already conservative (fictitious) number by 20%. $20 an hour is what an average prison guard makes working in a prison. But hey, you don't like kids.

I never said anything about teachers disliking kids so I don't know why you keep bringing it up. I don't have an Education degree. I don't (arguably) teach children. Teaching will not be my profession.

Do your figures compare with fields that require a similar amount of training? A good portion of teachers have post-graduate degrees

That link does not account for the amount of work done outside of the school at all.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
Last edited by BladeSlinger at Jan 2, 2016,
#33
Quote by Fat Lard
a Google xx.gov to find out the rules. As far as credentials go, ratemyprofessor.com is a good tool to getting students/ getting fired

i forgot to mention i'm lazy otherwise i would've gone through the effort of researching it myself.
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#34
So now we're gonna pretend that teaching is unique because it requires extensive training prior to employment. Do you know what it takes to become a certified welder? Or an architect? Or a mechanic? Each one of these has a far more difficult curriculum and work schedule for comparable pay.

I brought up your aversion to children because you did. You're transparently impelled towards believing teachers don't get paid enough because you have a bizarre dislike of children. I'm confident there isn't a salary you could invent right now that would satisfy your delusion that teachers are underpaid anyway. You exhibit all the indications of someone that believes the prevailing idea about teacher's wages without ever having scrutinized its merits.
#35
Quote by Rossenrot
So now we're gonna pretend that teaching is unique because it requires extensive training prior to employment. Do you know what it takes to become a certified welder? Or an architect? Or a mechanic? Each one of these has a far more difficult curriculum and work schedule for comparable pay.

I brought up your aversion to children because you did. You're transparently impelled towards believing teachers don't get paid enough because you have a bizarre dislike of children. I'm confident there isn't a salary you could invent right now that would satisfy your delusion that teachers are underpaid anyway. You exhibit all the indications of someone that believes the prevailing idea about teacher's wages without ever having scrutinized its merits.

dude what the fuck is wrong with you.

I said that I don't know how people do it because I don't like kids. Don't what the hell you're going on about. Even then, it's just as bad to act like you know what it takes to be an educator. you exhibit all the indications of someone that believes the prevailing idea that being a teacher is easy.

Department of Education surveys show that the average US teacher spend about 50-52 hours per week on school activities through their School and Staffing Surveys.

I take this stuff pretty seriously, but now you're just getting weird, man.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#36
sometimes reading a Rossenrot post is like listening to Dennis Miller talk.
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#37
I didn't even start out trying to argue about teachers at a national level. I was talking about Oklahoma specifically, and it ranks really low in education. but Rossenrot had to do his usual thing
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#38
I appreciate your unoriginality even less than your benightedness. Please produce a figure you think would appropriately recompense the "average US teacher."
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