#1
I am planning to paint my Les Paul yellow. I am wondering what I should do with the yellow strip or lining on the sides of the guitar. Should I just paint over it? Buy a new strip? I do not even know what it is called. I need advice. I could not find anything online.
#2
I think you are referring to the binding. I have replaced binding on both sides of a Les Paul neck (I never did the binding on the body and hopefully never will) and if you have never done it I would recommend you leave it alone. The binding is glued to a groove in the wood and sanded and shaped into the groove. You can do damage to the wood removing the old binding if you don't know how to do it properly.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#3
Is the binding plastic?
#4
Quote by NostraHistoria
I am planning to paint my Les Paul yellow.I need advice. I could not find anything online.


You need an Intervention.

Don't paint your guitar.

No, I get that you want to change the color.

Instead, go to Axewraps.com or axewrap.com or one of the other companies that will provide you with a transit vinyl wrap for your guitar. You can have a yellow transit vinyl wrap (they do whole cars in these things, leave it for several years and you can pull it off and still have the original finish) or some other thing custom printed for your guitar (some folks actually have fancy flame and quilt finishes printed up for cheapo junker guitars.

Since you don't even know what binding is, you're headed toward simply randomly ruining a guitar otherwise.
#5
It is cheap plastic. No thanks.
#6
Quote by NostraHistoria
It is cheap plastic. No thanks.

Polyester and Polyurethane are plastics. And they're 2 of (by far) the most common finishes used on guitars and they're typically applied very thick.

The binding that goes around the guitar is also plastic.

Refinishing is the most frustrating and difficult thing you can do with a guitar because there are so many ways in which you can fuck it up and have to start all over again. Its time-consuming, expensive on tools/supplies and it requires a lot of practice and patience to do well. If you do absolutely everything correctly and accidentally burn through the finish when doing a final buffing of the clearcoat, you can kiss all that time and effort to make the guitar look pretty goodbye.

If you have to ask the question of what binding is, you really should just leave your guitar's finish alone. This isn't something any old hack with a rattle can should be messing with.
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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jan 2, 2016,
#7
Quote by NostraHistoria
It is cheap plastic. No thanks.


That's precisely the point. If you go to Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills tomorrow, every tenth Lamborghini Aventador is wrapped. Or it's Plasti-Dipped. Both are considered great ways to personalize a really expensive car without screwing up a paint job that would require tens of thousands of dollars to bring back to original. It allows you to return the car to the original paint job and not lose a big chunk of resale value in the process. It also allows you to re-personalize the car as often as you like and it's inexpensive (relative to the cost of the car) to do so.

If you're asking questions about "the yellow stripe on Les Pauls," you have absolutely no business coming anywhere near that guitar with a paint can. Fact is, the paint job that you see in your head might not be anywhere near as appealing once done, and if you've actually refinished the guitar, there's really no going back.

You've asked for information and opinions and you've got them. You're welcome to ignore the advice as you wish, but I really hate those, "You know, I went ahead and did it, and you were right, it was a mistake..." posts further down the line.
#9
Quote by NostraHistoria
I am planning to paint my Les Paul yellow. I am wondering what I should do with the yellow strip or lining on the sides of the guitar. Should I just paint over it? Buy a new strip? I do not even know what it is called. I need advice. I could not find anything online.
At the Martin factory those "stripes" are actually lacquered over when the guitar is painted. Later, a factory worker goes back and physically "scrapes" the paint from the binding.

TRUST ME, this is not a task for the weekend guitar modder, not no way, not no how!

The reason it is done this way, is because it's hard to mask the binding manually, plus there is always the danger of the paint running under the masking tape anyway. This is particularly true of very thin lacquer, or lacquer which has had "******er" adder. (******er slows the drying of lacquer in hot weather, which is necessary to prevent "blushing", a milky haze in the clear coat).

(under the asterisks is a pejorative term for a mentally incapacitated or limited individual, which the forum software won't allow, despite the fact it is the actual name of the product).

Besides, this old man grew up with "canary yellow" muscle cars being in abundance. I thought it was ugly as hell then, and I still do.

I full well realize, "beauty is in the eye of the beholder", so that's only an "IMHO" assessment. But bright yellow also seems to me to be, a color the likes of which one would tire quite rapidly...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 3, 2016,
#10
Quote by dspellman
BTW, I think that's an L6S, not an LS6. What condition is that guitar in?


The neck is in bad shape, and the pickup selector is not the original. Its tone is nice. Are you interested in it? My mom sent it out of the country. She has to bring it back for me.