#1
I've been playing off and on for 10 or so years. I'm more of an audio engineer than a guitarist, but I'm looking to get back into the game.

I recently ordered a Gibson Les Paul Special Pro. I had a LP studio for awhile but sold it awhile back to pay for recording gear. I got the special pro because I'm familiar with LPs so since I'm ordering online, I might as well play it safe.

Now, I got it in the mail and it has a bit of a buzz and the action is a tad high. I'm going to adjust it and see what I can get out of it, but if I'm going to return it I need to act fast before it's too late. I like the tone and the feel of the neck.

I've also had my eye on a Schecter Banshee Elete, however there are no stores close to me that have one. *Im tempted to get the 7-string, but that's a whole other topic*
I'm wondering if anyone has experience with both and how they relate/differ as far as feel and tone go.

I've never played or heard a Sustainic Pickup in person. Thoughts?

I've been hearing better and better things about Shecter, and not so good things about Gibson.

Any help is greatly appreciated!
Last edited by klintala at Jan 3, 2016,
#2
The big differences:
- The Banshee has a skinny neck and the LP has a fat neck.
- The Banshee has a longer scale and will sound a little brighter and twangier than the LP.
- The Banshee has modern voiced pickups, the Les Paul has modern voiced pickups. If you don’t know what the difference is there are A/B videos on YouTube.

Sustainiac Pickups are for people who want to get creative with sustain. They’re great in bands that have a keyboard player because then both instruments can start doing wacky shit with long notes. Type O Negative did a lot of this on their later albums. They’re also good for styles of music that do well with lots of sustain, such a rearranging violin parts or imitating Indian instruments like the sitar that get significantly more sustain than an electric guitar does at reasonable volumes.
#3
Thanks for the reply. Will the Banshee neck be slimmer than my LP with "slim neck". I definitely prefer thin necks. The twang might be a factor. For me, it's generally a little more difficult to dial in twangier guitars. But I'm usually always adding highs anyway, so a light brightness might not hurt, as long as it's not too twangy.

1min on one and I could probably make up my mind no problem.
Last edited by klintala at Jan 3, 2016,
#4
Schecter is a great company that makes great quality instruments for great prices. In my experience, their QC is, in nearly every case, better than Gibson's is currently. That said, there are some major considerations to take into account.

A Banshee is going to feel 100% different from the LP. The neck is thinner (think somewhere between an Ibanez RG and a Standard Strat), the scale will be longer (tighter string tension), and the body is going to be lighter (unless you get the seven string). They will sound drastically different. Your LP is going to have a rounder, more pronounced low end with somewhat subdued highs, and the Schecter will have more bite in the mids and upper mids. It's in no way twangy, so i'm not sure where that came from. Brighter, yes, but unless the other guy's idea of twangy is different (I think Telecaster immediately when I hear 'twang'), it may just be a misused word. I don't have much experience with the Sustainiac system, but my understanding of it is that it works like a normal humbucker and can be toggled to basically be a static E-Bow with a switch on the body of the guitar, generating a sustain loop and causing constant vibration of the string(s) desired.

Yes, the Banshee's neck will be slimmer than 60's LP Slim neck (again, unless you get the seven string. In that case, they're similar, only the seven string will be obviously wider). You'll have higher output pickups on deck than you're used to (assuming you use the stock LP pickups).

As for your action/buzz issue, it might be resolved with a bit of tinkering with the truss rod/bridge/saddles. Then again, it might be that the frets aren't level, and that's a job that, in my opinion, you shouldn't need to deal with on a brand new guitar. Does it happen? Absolutely. I just don't think it should. Especially on a new guitar that's over $700, but I'm an old fart and have been around long enough to know that guitars that are sold now for $700 would've cost almost twice that when I was younger.

My opinion? If you're not happy with your new guitar, for any reason, swap it. You're not going to enjoy it more magically, and it's not gonna 'grow on you' over time, generally. Always go with your gut, and if you don't dig something about it, appreciate that this is your preference and find something that better suits it.

That said, I don't know that one is 'better' than the other. I've got a Schecter. I've had a few LPs. I prefer the Schecter for some things, the LPs for another, but in the end, I kept the Schecter.

That's my two cents. Hope it helped at least somewhat.

“We’re built of contradictions, all of us. It’s those opposing forces that give us strength, like an arch, each block pressing the next. Give me a man whose parts are all aligned in agreement and I’ll show you madness. We walk a narrow path, insanity to each side. A man without contradictions to balance him will soon veer off.”



silentfall.bandcamp.com
#5
Go play one.

Seriously, you're comparing apples to oranges here. Those 2 guitars will feel radically different from one another.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jan 3, 2016,
#6
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Go play one.

Seriously, you're comparing apples to oranges here. Those 2 guitars will feel radically different from one another.


That's kind of what I was expecting. All the information provided is exactly what I was looking for. I can't find one anywhere around me so all I have to go by is what I know, LP. So knowing how things are different or similar is extremely helpful. I really wish I could get my hands on one. I got a good deal on the LP so I wouldn't want to swap out the LP for the Banshee and not be able to get the LP back if I end up not liking the LP.

How difficult is it to switch between different neck sizes?
Ideally I'd like to have a shred guitar(that can handle lower tunings) and another guitar for everything else.
My concern with that would be doing all this drilling on a LP and later transferring that to a banshee.
#7
Quote by klintala

How difficult is it to switch between different neck sizes?
Ideally I'd like to have a shred guitar(that can handle lower tunings) and another guitar for everything else.
My concern with that would be doing all this drilling on a LP and later transferring that to a banshee.


It's not difficult to switch between different neck sizes.

Doing *what* drilling? This is the first I've heard of *drilling*...

Don't drill one guitar and then transfer to the other guitar; choose one and leave it there.

I have sustainers on several guitars. My setup was done by Gary Brawer and allows you to use a *different* neck pickup rather than the sustainer driver. Sustainers will, yes, sustain a note until the battery dies. That's a good thing. But they'll also simulate feedback sustain, including the way that your guitar will sometimes begin to add the harmonic an octave up from the note you're sustaining, etc. You can do this without an extra loud amp next to your ear. In fact, you can do this without any amp at all, thanks to the sustainer.
There are three major manufacturers of sustainers: Fernandes (which has a rigid PC board and usually requires routing), Sustainiac (a flexible one designed to fit into the control cavity of a lot of guitars) and the Kramer/Floyd Rose Sustainer (usually found only on the Jackson PC-1). All require a 9V battery, either crammed into the control cavity or in a battery box at the back of the guitar.

My switches are mounted behind the Floyd Rose on my guitars, and are out of the way of the controls. That required a separate rout in the back of the guitar for the circuit board, but it's a much better location. In addition, I was able to run one of the three adjustment pots on the circuit board out to a control pot on the guitar itself, in this case allowing me to control Sustainer Intensity externally. Very useful.
#8
Drilling as in repetitive practicing. Speed exercises, scales, sweeps. I've switched between acoustic and electric playing leads no problem, but that was before getting into faster metal.
I'm not sure if it would be easy or difficult to practice speed playing on an LP for a year and then try to transfer that to a banshee. Maybe it will just take a couple weeks for my fingers to adjust. I just wouldn't want to make the change and be fumbling around for a few months.
And at this point when I say banshee I pretty much mean a designated metal guitar. I say banshee because that's the one I've had my eye on.

If it's not going to be a terribly hard transition I'll probably keep the LP(if all it needs is some tweaking), and worry about a metal guitar later.


Thanks for information, very helpful!!
#9
Okay, let's clear up a couple of misconceptions here.

First, there's no such thing as a 'shred' guitar. If you've ever seen someone absolutely rip on a Dreadnought, you'll understand why. What makes something 'shred' or not is how you play it and the technique applied. Some guitars absolutely (I'm looking at you, Ibanez) make it 'easier' to shred because in conjunction with a flatter neck radius, the action can be set lower, but this is by no means the only way to go, and in fact some guys (myself included) don't like flat necks and crazy low action. I like a little bit of fight in my strings - what I call 'bite back' so that it feels lively and responsive when I play. A lot of jazz guys use massive strings in standard 440 and raise their action higher than I have mine and it doesn't impede their ability to play quickly and articulately. More specific to your personal case, there are plenty of guys who melt on LPs - off the top of my head, you could look at Zakk Wylde and Matt Heafy from Trivium.

Second, if your technique suffers that much when you're running scales and technique practice between necks, even if they're different, either you haven't been playing that long (which is fine) or there's something fundamentally wrong with your technique. Not to say that switching between, say, a fat LP neck and an Ibanez Wizard III won't have a difference, but it's not such a massive chasm that your technique should drop through the floor. The notable exception here is extended scale instruments - 8 or 9 string guitars, and, in some cases, a 7 string can take a bit to acclimate to, but again, even on these your capacity shouldn't evaporate, just take some minor adjusting.

Lastly - a metal guitar is a guitar that you play metal on. I've seen it done on a Telecaster (a-la John 5), on a LP (the aforementioned Zakk Wylde), a Strat (Iron Maiden/KSE for a minute), and the hordes of Ibanez/Jackson/Schecter guys. Hell, I've seen a guy play Animals As Leaders on a Sitar and it sounded metal. What's the point? What you play makes it metal, not the gear. Look, I get it - we're all guitarists, and we all love gear. But if you're looking to gear to make sure you can play a certain genre, it's time better spent on just playing and writing, man. If Eddie Van Halen plugged into a beater rig in a pawn shop, he's still going to sound like Eddie Van Halen.

Magic happens through the gear, not because of it.

“We’re built of contradictions, all of us. It’s those opposing forces that give us strength, like an arch, each block pressing the next. Give me a man whose parts are all aligned in agreement and I’ll show you madness. We walk a narrow path, insanity to each side. A man without contradictions to balance him will soon veer off.”



silentfall.bandcamp.com
Last edited by an.interloper at Jan 4, 2016,
#10
Thanks for the post, very informative.
The reason I'm looking to to have 2 guitars is mainly for tuning, and if they make guitars that are catered to the specific style I'm looking for I might as well try it out, or at least look into it.
The LP will cover most of my needs, but when it comes to heavier styles I'm would like the option to play in lower tuning. And I would like that guitar set up with thicker strings to handle those tunings. If I'm going to have a specific guitar to handle lower tunings I might as well get one that caters to that style.
That's why I said a "shred" guitar. No different than if I were to have a hollow body and call it my jazz guitar. I didn't get it so I can be able to play jazz, I got it because it has the tone and feel that compliment that genre.

That's why not ever trying a banshee I asked how it compares to an LP. Mostly everyone said apples to oranges which is exactly what I needed to know. Now I decide if I bite the bullet and try something new or stick with what I know for now. If they were very similar I probably wouldn't hesitate to try the banshee over the LP.
#11
Just to throw out my two cents, I got a chance to play a Banshee Elite not too long ago. Was flippin glorious. And it is a very thin neck. And that Schecter Custom Shop pickup they put in it sounds awesome. Not to be confused with the imported "Diamond" pickups that they use stock in their lower end models. The custom shop pickups are made in California and absolutely on par with, or better than, any other pickup you'll ever see from the more known pickup brands.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
Last edited by the_bi99man at Jan 5, 2016,
#12
Quote by an.interloper


First, there's no such thing as a 'shred' guitar.




Good post, which very much echoes my sentiments - "It's mostly in the fingers, and they can get used to just about anything with practice"

It reminded me of this, one of my favourite Youtube vids:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NfOHjeI-Bns
#13
Quote by Tony Done
Good post, which very much echoes my sentiments - "It's mostly in the fingers, and they can get used to just about anything with practice"

It reminded me of this, one of my favourite Youtube vids:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NfOHjeI-Bns

Nice to see someone else knows about her. She's hyper-talented.

“We’re built of contradictions, all of us. It’s those opposing forces that give us strength, like an arch, each block pressing the next. Give me a man whose parts are all aligned in agreement and I’ll show you madness. We walk a narrow path, insanity to each side. A man without contradictions to balance him will soon veer off.”



silentfall.bandcamp.com