#1
I purchased a guitar about 4 months ago as a complete noob. Practice is going well, but the more i'm learning the more i feel like my guitar needs to be adjusted. The action for instance is WAY too high for my comfort (about 5mm on 12th fret). Now could i just change the action myself, or should i take my guitar to my local shop and have it finetuned there? Because it's still on "out-of-the-box" settings, i feel like they can optimize my guitar even more, not just the action.
#2
Every guitar player should own a copy of:

www.amazon.com/Make-Your-Electric-Guitar-Great/dp/0879309989

You'll get a better understanding of how guitars work, and the satisfaction of doing something yourself and saving money and time.
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#3
After buying a guitar it's always recommendable to do a complete setup, string change, battery change (if applicable). Unless you're supper happy with how things are. If you are serious about guitars then I would suggest learning to do it yourself, through books and videos.
Last edited by dthmtl3 at Jan 4, 2016,
#4
Since it's the first time take it to a pro so you can get a feel for the differences between the original setup and the new setup, and what can be achieved. Ask some questions if they're friendly. Then begin the process of learning for yourself with your new frame of reference and the myriad resources available online and in print.
#5
If you are just adjusting the action I would say you are completely capable. Even if you had to set up the guitar I would guess you are capable. Anyone can become an amateur with a little reading and study.
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#6
Quote by dthmtl3
After buying a guitar it's always recommendable to do a complete setup, string change, battery change (if applicable). Unless you're supper happy with how things are. If you are serious about guitars then I would suggest learning to do it yourself, through books and videos.


You don't play the first set of strings that comes with the guitar? I guess I'm just too tight, I can't bring myself to take the "free" strings off until they are worn out, even when I know new strings sound better. I don't play professionally either, so nobody but me hears them but me. I get it if a pro changes strings right off...not if somebody like me does.

I've got an old Dean with super cruddy disgusting strings on it. Never have changed them. Those strings have such an ugly, unpolished sound. I love the dirty, ragged sound of those strings. I have no idea what brand they are.
Last edited by TobusRex at Jan 5, 2016,
#7
Quote by TobusRex
You don't play the first set of strings that comes with the guitar? I guess I'm just too tight, I can't bring myself to take the "free" strings off until they are worn out, even when I know new strings sound better. I don't play professionally either, so nobody but me hears them but me. I get it if a pro changes strings right off...not if somebody like me does.

I've got an old Dean with super cruddy disgusting strings on it. Never have changed them. Those strings have such an ugly, unpolished sound. I love the dirty, ragged sound of those strings. I have no idea what brand they are.


I don't play those strings and I'm certainly no pro. I've purchased "new" guitars that were manufactured two years before I bought them. I don't like 9s anyway so I replace them with 10s but even if I did, I don't like the feel of corroding strings.
Last edited by dthmtl3 at Jan 5, 2016,